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Old 06-04-2019, 07:27 AM   #16
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Re: Outlet type of 220v welder


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Originally Posted by seephor View Post
Attached garage. The circuit is fed from a subpanel located in the garage as well. Using 6/3 NM cable for the 50A circuit. It's located about 15 feet from the panel.

Are you saying that you will run this new welder circuit from a sub panel that is in the garage already? If so what size panel is it? What is the max amps it can handle and what loads do you have on it already? Putting a welder on the sub panel may tap it out capacity wise.


Also what is your main service amp at? Are you sure you can handle a welder with your present electrical service? What other electrical appliances do you have in your home - oven, range, dryer, hot water heater etc?


I would not install any wire or receptacles until you select your welder and then go by only the nameplate manufacturer's recommendation on the welder itself. And before buying the welder be sure that you present electrical service for your house can handle it.
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Old 06-05-2019, 11:31 AM   #17
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Re: Outlet type of 220v welder


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Originally Posted by chandler48 View Post
Another question not asked, is your garage detached or attached to the house? Detached, you can only run one circuit to it.

When I bought my house, the detached garage had one 240V and two 120V circuits run to it underground. It was approved by the previous 'nice' building inspector when the house was built the previous year.


When I finished the interior of the garage a couple of years later, I pulled a permit and ran another 240V circuit and three more 120V circuits from the house underground. When I called for the inspection, the 'nice' inspector said, "It's just a garage. I'm sure it's fine," and he didn't even come out to look at it. I love this guy!


Ten years passed, and I had an addition built on my house. The new 'picky' inspector had a conniption when he saw the garage wiring. He not only made me install a service panel in the garage, I also had to separate it completely from the house and run a whole new service from the pole.


I suspect there was an element of 'punitive damages' in his requirements because my contractor and a relative who is an independent inspector both told me a sub-panel run off the 200 amp service in the house would have been adequate. (The house is 1856 sq.ft. with a 912 sq.ft. attached garage. The detached garage is 864 sq.ft.) Unfortunately, our building code enforcement department is a small one-man operation, so I couldn't appeal his demands to anyone else.


It ended up costing me more in the long run, but I still don't regret 'cheating' when I did the work 22 years ago because I couldn't afford to hire an electrician back then. If I hadn't done it the way I did, I wouldn't have been able to restore several cars, which required 240V service for my welder and big compressor. By the time I got caught, I had the money to do it right.

Last edited by rcpaulsen; 06-05-2019 at 11:33 AM. Reason: Correct spelling
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Old 06-05-2019, 01:18 PM   #18
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Re: Outlet type of 220v welder


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Originally Posted by rcpaulsen View Post
When I bought my house, the detached garage had one 240V and two 120V circuits run to it underground. It was approved by the previous 'nice' building inspector when the house was built the previous year.


When I finished the interior of the garage a couple of years later, I pulled a permit and ran another 240V circuit and three more 120V circuits from the house underground. When I called for the inspection, the 'nice' inspector said, "It's just a garage. I'm sure it's fine," and he didn't even come out to look at it. I love this guy!


Ten years passed, and I had an addition built on my house. The new 'picky' inspector had a conniption when he saw the garage wiring. He not only made me install a service panel in the garage, I also had to separate it completely from the house and run a whole new service from the pole.


I suspect there was an element of 'punitive damages' in his requirements because my contractor and a relative who is an independent inspector both told me a sub-panel run off the 200 amp service in the house would have been adequate. (The house is 1856 sq.ft. with a 912 sq.ft. attached garage. The detached garage is 864 sq.ft.) Unfortunately, our building code enforcement department is a small one-man operation, so I couldn't appeal his demands to anyone else.


It ended up costing me more in the long run, but I still don't regret 'cheating' when I did the work 22 years ago because I couldn't afford to hire an electrician back then. If I hadn't done it the way I did, I wouldn't have been able to restore several cars, which required 240V service for my welder and big compressor. By the time I got caught, I had the money to do it right.
With all those separate runs to the garage, why not just install a panel off of the main and pull one cable in the first place. You did like three times the amount of work needed to do it properly assuming you ran separate conduit for each run or direct bury each run.
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Old 06-06-2019, 07:54 AM   #19
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Re: Outlet type of 220v welder


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Originally Posted by seephor View Post
With all those separate runs to the garage, why not just install a panel off of the main and pull one cable in the first place. You did like three times the amount of work needed to do it properly assuming you ran separate conduit for each run or direct bury each run.





The simple answer is that I didn't know any better. I saw what the previous owner had done and copied it. If he had put a sub-panel in the garage, I would have added another one. Instead, I dug the trench down to the existing underground cable, dropped the cables for all the new circuits in at one time, and buried it again. There was no more work involved (at that time) than burying four #1 AWG wires to feed a 100 AMP sub-panel. The extra work came ten years later, and by that time I could afford to pay somebody else to do it. Cost-wise, I don't know if all the wire I had to run equaled the cost of a sub-panel or not.
I didnít need a sub-panel for the addition I put on my home because I had enough space left in the original panel for all of the new circuits. But, since the heavy-gauge wire was already in place, and the inspector wouldnít let me use it to feed a sub-panel in the garage, the electrician suggested installing a sub-panel for the addition instead of running several individual circuits all the way across the old basement - exactly the argument you made in your response, but applied to the addition instead of the garage.
The detached garage and my house addition are both on the opposite end of the basement from the original service panel, so the electrician hung the sub-panel right over the spot where the old garage circuits exited the basement, and just shortened the wires from the 240V welder circuit to feed the sub-panel. The other cables were also pulled back and used to supply the new circuits in my newly-finished basement. Very little was wasted. That was easy.
I was expecting to be criticized for my Ďno regretsí comment. I don't want to be seen encouraging people to violate the NEC, but I would point out that the work I copied had passed inspection the previous year, so thatís on the inspector. I did pull a permit, and the inspector told me I was good to go, so I didnít realize my work didnít meet code. In spite of that, it was not demonstrably unsafe, either.
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Old 06-12-2019, 03:59 PM   #20
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Re: Outlet type of 220v welder


Check the plug for the welder and buy a receptacle to match. I wanted to use the same outlet for a 220v space heater and so bought a new cord for the heater to match the receptacle.



When we buy our next car it will be an electric vehicle and the charging stations use their own plug end so I will be adding another box for a second receptacle type.
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Old 06-12-2019, 04:48 PM   #21
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Re: Outlet type of 220v welder


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I wanted to use the same outlet for a 220v space heater and so bought a new cord for the heater to match the receptacle.
You possibly violated code and had the wrong amperage service to the heater, either too high OCP or too low. You should always match the receptacle to the UL cord on the appliance.
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