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Old 01-17-2010, 10:13 AM   #1
 
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must I change to a 4 prong receptacle


The wiring in my house for both my dryer and stove is set up for 3 prong receptacles. There is no ground wire in the wiring. House was built in the 70's. I am having a new electric range delivered next week, and I would like to install the 3 prong 50 amp receptacle I bought, but I keep reading that since 1996 there was a revision made that states that the National Electric Code is that every electric range must have a 4 prong outlet or receptacle. I am not clear if that is absolutely necessary in older homes or not. I know it is the case in newer built homes. So, I just want to know if I have to rewire and get a 4 prong receptacle? I can access wiring if asolutely necessary.

Last edited by WendyS; 01-17-2010 at 10:19 AM.
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Old 01-17-2010, 10:25 AM   #2
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Is the wiring a cable ?
In conduit.....metal conduit or PVC ?
You are not required to upgrade existing wiring as code changes
It is a good idea.......



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Old 01-17-2010, 10:45 AM   #3
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You do not need a new receptacle and you do not have to rewire anything. You need to take the old cord off the old dryer and put it on the new dryer. Then just plug it in like the old one was.
You are correct that three wire circuits for dryer and ranges are no longer allowed. But, since it already exists, you basically get a pass.
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Old 01-17-2010, 10:47 AM   #4
 
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Hi Dave,

Forgive me if I don't have the wiring lingo down. I know what I have, but not sure if it is technically called metal conduit or not. Hopefully, you can help me on this. The wiring I have is copper with a neutral white, a black hot, and a red hot wire. Not sure,but may be considered 6-2 or 6-3 wire.

Sincerely,
Wendy S
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Old 01-17-2010, 11:04 AM   #5
 
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Thanks J.V.

I'm dealing with a stove, not a dryer. But, I get what you are saying. They are similar in approach with regards to dealing with the 3 wire circuit and the plugs that attach to each. I'm glad I am not required to change, because I really don't want to deal with the rewiring if I don't have to. Thank again.

Wendy S.
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Old 01-17-2010, 01:52 PM   #6
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You are not required to change your house wiring, However you do need to make sure your new Range or dryer frame is bonded to the neutral to use the 3 wire cord and plug.
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Old 01-17-2010, 05:02 PM   #7
 
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now thinking about just changing receptacle to 4 prong


Since I can access my wiring just fine, I am considering rewiring to accomodate a 4 prong receptacle for my electric range. I think it probably would be a good idea to not only be up to par with current code, but to also have that extra ground wire available. I'm big on grounding with ground wires. lol. What I have is a 40 amp breaker in the fuse box, and the stove will be using 40 amps, but what I'm not sure about is what the technical name is for the 4 wire that I will need, and I can only find 50 amp 4 prong receptacles in the store (don't even see 40 amp available), so I guess I will be using a 50 amp 4 prong receptacle, but not sure about what the voltage rating should be on that. Can somone tell me the wiring needed and the voltage needed on the 50 amp 4 prong receptacle? I would like to take care of wiring my receptacle and getting the wire over to my fuse box, but I will let my local electrician take care of connecting the wires to the 40 amp fuse.
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Old 01-17-2010, 05:42 PM   #8
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The code allows you to install a 40A or 50A breaker on the 50A range rec. The factors involved is your range draw and your wire size. If you are able to use NM cable (romex) #8 requires a 40 A breaker If you use #6 NM you can install a 40A or 50A breaker on it and be code compilant.
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