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Old 03-01-2018, 02:23 PM   #1
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Moving a Grounding Rod


Is there a way to relocate a grounding rod (or make a new one) when it's buried in the concrete floor of a basement?

The ground for my house looks like a piece of rebar that was driven into the ground and then set in the concrete foundation. It's in an awkward spot for some renovation I'm doing and I'd like to have a new one put in a few feet away (or move it outside). Is this going to be a big deal?

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Old 03-01-2018, 02:46 PM   #2
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


If this is a Ufer or CEE ground it cannot be moved. When was the house built?
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Old 03-01-2018, 03:43 PM   #3
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


The house was built in 2016. I understand it can't be moved. I was hoping to have it ground flat and to put a new grounding rod elsewhere. likely outside because I don't want to put any new holes in the foundation.
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Old 03-01-2018, 04:57 PM   #4
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


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The house was built in 2016. I understand it can't be moved. I was hoping to have it ground flat and to put a new grounding rod elsewhere. likely outside because I don't want to put any new holes in the foundation.
Check with local jurisdiction. Some places require a ufer ground.
But maybe locality would allow you to pound a few ground rods instead.

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Old 03-01-2018, 07:06 PM   #5
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


Knowing its name "Ufer" helped me learn about it, makes sense why they did it like this. I'll give the town a call on it!
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Old 03-01-2018, 07:10 PM   #6
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


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Check with local jurisdiction. Some places require a ufer ground.
But maybe locality would allow you to pound a few ground rods instead.

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The NEC requires it on new construction, and requires that any Ufer ground which does exist be connected. It cannot be replaced with other types of grounding electrodes.

It may be possible to make the connection flush with the slab. You'd have to chip out the concrete around that rebar to make a pocket below the slab surface, and make a channel from a wall over to the pocket you made. Make the grounding conductor connection down in the pocket and run the wire through the channel into the wall. Pour self-leveling grout to fill the areas you chipped out.
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Old 03-01-2018, 07:26 PM   #7
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


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The NEC requires it on new construction, and requires that any Ufer ground which does exist be connected. It cannot be replaced with other types of grounding electrodes.

It may be possible to make the connection flush with the slab. You'd have to chip out the concrete around that rebar to make a pocket below the slab surface, and make a channel from a wall over to the pocket you made. Make the grounding conductor connection down in the pocket and run the wire through the channel into the wall. Pour self-leveling grout to fill the areas you chipped out.
Local authority can supersede nec

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Old 03-01-2018, 09:45 PM   #8
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


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Local authority can supersede nec

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Very true, I know of several places where the connection has to be able to be inspected/visible. Much like how many connection in your wiring system can't be hidden and has to be accessible..

I know somebody who lived in an area that had this requirement so they ended up bearing an electrical box in the floor where the cover could be removed to verify the connection if required. Made the project quite complex but made the AHJ happy.
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Old 03-01-2018, 11:18 PM   #9
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


I used to live in Northern MN and the local electrical inspectors didn't require a ufer ground if the slab and footings were insulated with rigid foam, which was typical with slab on grade houses there. No point in a ufer since the concrete doesn't make contact with the ground.
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Old 03-02-2018, 09:49 AM   #10
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


Interesting..... I did not know that ground contact was a necessary requirement for a ufer functioning.....

(but I would guess most foundations do have ground contact.... but rebar is buried in concrete and I would think concrete is non-conductive...so I really have no idea how a ufer really functions)
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Old 03-02-2018, 10:13 AM   #11
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Re: Moving a Grounding Rod


The concrete encased electrode formally consists of at least 20 feet of metal embedded in concrete below grade. When a concrete foundation possesses rebar, some combination of the rebar must be wire tied to form a bonded length of at least 20 feet (or better, 20 feet in one piece) with an end protruding to attach a ground wire (grounding electrode conductor).

Significant research involving chemical properties of concrete was done by a Herbert Ufer in the 1940's to improve grounding of structures in dry areas. The theory is too complex to describe here. Today, "Ufer" is used loosely to apply to any concrete encased grounding electrode.
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:08 AM   #12
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Concrete is considered a grounded surface. The footer is also typically surrounded by moist soil.
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