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Old 06-18-2010, 08:18 AM   #31
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I've never even given that a thought but how would you tighten the jam nut?
Panel boxes are 14 1/4" inch wide so they do fit between the studs that are 16" on center which is pretty standard in the US. When the panel box is between studs, all wires are fed out the top or bottom which makes for a nice clean installation.
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Old 06-18-2010, 08:25 AM   #32
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I've never even given that a thought but how would you tighten the jam nut?
Panel boxes are 14 1/4" inch wide so they do fit between the studs that are 16" on center which is pretty standard in the US. When the panel box is between studs, all wires are fed out the top or bottom which makes for a nice clean installation.
With the requirement of 1 wire per cable clamp, would there be enough holes on the top and bottom for all the circuits?
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Old 06-18-2010, 10:06 AM   #33
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With the requirement of 1 wire per cable clamp, would there be enough holes on the top and bottom for all the circuits?
The listing for most NM cable connectors allow at least two cables per connector depending upon size.
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Old 06-18-2010, 10:50 AM   #34
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That is assuming romex, which we don't know for sure is OK in his location.

If you have alot of circuits to run, you might want to make use of a Junction box. This is an empty box connected to the service panel with a large diameter conduit. This way, you can minimize the penetrations into the service panel and keep it in a convienient place AND be able to easily run new wires and circuits.

My panel is set into the wall and faces outside, it's surrounded with stucco... not very easy to make changes to! However, I have a junction box in the attic that is connected with a 24" riser of 2.5" conduit. All my circuits are run through the junction box instead of the service panel. Wire from the breakers and busses are fed up to the J box, where they are wire nutted to the romex runs.
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Old 06-18-2010, 01:11 PM   #35
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That is assuming romex, which we don't know for sure is OK in his location.

If you have alot of circuits to run, you might want to make use of a Junction box. This is an empty box connected to the service panel with a large diameter conduit. This way, you can minimize the penetrations into the service panel and keep it in a convienient place AND be able to easily run new wires and circuits.

My panel is set into the wall and faces outside, it's surrounded with stucco... not very easy to make changes to! However, I have a junction box in the attic that is connected with a 24" riser of 2.5" conduit. All my circuits are run through the junction box instead of the service panel. Wire from the breakers and busses are fed up to the J box, where they are wire nutted to the romex runs.
Have a picture? I am interested in how this looks it sounds like a wonderful idea.


As for the question about the white tape etc... I did read and made sure that you must mark any non hot wire meaning neutral or ground if it has insulation with at least 2 inches of tape down the wire of the color that coordinates to the standard - green for insulated ground - white for neutral.

I was going to ask does anyone know if the wires are completely in conduit coming in through the bottom or side of the box is there a need for any sort of clamp as long as there isn't any form of tension on the wire which there shouldn't be anyways?
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Old 06-18-2010, 01:39 PM   #36
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The conduit is clamped to the box, not the wire.

I'll see if I can find a picture.
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Old 06-18-2010, 02:19 PM   #37
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With the requirement of 1 wire per cable clamp,
As was stated, there is NO such requirement.
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Old 06-18-2010, 03:58 PM   #38
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I'm a newer DIYer, so pardon my ignorance (literally).

Most of the clamps that I've seen require some amount of clearance on the outside of the box. This box looks like there is none between the box and the stud.

Can the clamps be put on the inside of the box to hold the cables coming into the box?
how about drilling a hole in the stud large enough to fit an NM connector through and into the proper sized hole in the panel tub?

But there are also NM connectors that simply snap into a hole and use, more or less, a wedge to restrain the NM. You can put those on from the inside of the panel

and then there are these that simply stick into the hole and you shove the NM through them. The ears or tabs will restrain the NM.

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Old 06-18-2010, 05:15 PM   #39
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Individual conductors in conduit do not require a connector. The conduit must end in a proper male conduit adapter.

Cables need cable connectors to connect to the panel.
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Old 06-18-2010, 05:39 PM   #40
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Alright this is what I have done so far to rectify the issue lemme know what you guys think or any recommendations.... Thanks once again for everyone's input. The picture outside is the other side directly behind obviously lol... and the one with the box cover on is the final product so far. And I do know I still have some things to do... my one concern is how I routed the ground cable that comes in through the left that is the one that is connected to the water meter on either side... anyone see a issue with that being routed behind and above that jbox.


Edit: also yes I do know that the very outside layer of the main lines is a little torn up and I did check to make sure the actual insulation wasn't at all damaged which it wasn't... pulling that crap through those bends was a ***** to say the least haha
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Old 06-18-2010, 06:08 PM   #41
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Well it look better with the 6 by 6 box however you still have one issue is the conductors on the left side of the panel the indivual conductors must be in the conduit so you will have to find a way to do it correct by putting a juction box on the left side of the stud wall cavity and run the emt conduit over { if you going with the LR or LL ell you can not cover this up at all }

Otherwise you will have to move it up to top and run from the top in proper way.

As far for grounding conductor { the bare one } that is ok to go over the 6by6 box.

but do get the other items fix before the inspector come.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 06-18-2010, 07:14 PM   #42
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MUCH IMPROVED!

You should be able to find a 1" sweep elbow for those wires on the side, and a glue on connector for it... that shouldn't be too big a hole. Remember, you have to pull a ground wire through there too! Alternatively, you could use a metal flex cable and a fitting that screws in from the inside instead of clamping on the outside, that will reduce your total drill hole size.

To drill that hole larger, you will have to use a hole saw and a small piece of plywood:

Use the holesaw to drill a hole in the piece of plywood. This is now your hole guide. Screw the plywood hole where you want your new hole to be. Now plaace the holesaw back in the hole and start drilling. The previous hole will guide the saw from the outside, since there is no center wood for the guidebit. One the hole is strted you can remove the hole guide.

The ground cable is fine.

Last edited by xxPaulCPxx; 06-18-2010 at 07:25 PM.
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Old 06-19-2010, 09:59 AM   #43
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MUCH IMPROVED!

You should be able to find a 1" sweep elbow for those wires on the side, and a glue on connector for it... that shouldn't be too big a hole. Remember, you have to pull a ground wire through there too! Alternatively, you could use a metal flex cable and a fitting that screws in from the inside instead of clamping on the outside, that will reduce your total drill hole size.

To drill that hole larger, you will have to use a hole saw and a small piece of plywood:

Use the holesaw to drill a hole in the piece of plywood. This is now your hole guide. Screw the plywood hole where you want your new hole to be. Now plaace the holesaw back in the hole and start drilling. The previous hole will guide the saw from the outside, since there is no center wood for the guidebit. One the hole is strted you can remove the hole guide.

The ground cable is fine.
Alright this is going to sound stupid but how would I attach a metal flex cable to the 1 1/2 in pvc pipe for those wires? ive never personally seen a attachment for that... anyways also I did pull a ground wire its actually tapped green which I just found out from you guys is against code? It should be a solid green correct? I remember reading that if the conductor is above a certain gauge it must be that specified color it cant be taped the color... anyways the only other question I had is even know I ran the ground neutral and 2 hots out to the garage I have seen two different opinions because the garage is a detached structure and a sub panel the ground and neutral buss's are isolated from each-other... but my other question is I am suppose to put in 2 8 foot grounding poles at-least 6 feet apart correct at the garage also...? because its detached? I have read one person says no the ground wire to the main is sufficient but than I also have read no you need the 2 grounding poles which I would do 10 feet apart anyways...
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Old 06-19-2010, 12:18 PM   #44
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A detached structure fed from the main panel will require a grounding electrode system. This will be your two rods in addition to any at the main service.

Conductors smaller than #4 need to be insulated in the proper color insulation, unless part of a cable assembly.
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Old 06-19-2010, 12:37 PM   #45
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A detached structure fed from the main panel will require a grounding electrode system. This will be your two rods in addition to any at the main service.

Conductors smaller than #4 need to be insulated in the proper color insulation, unless part of a cable assembly.

Damn... I already ran the two lines for the neutral and ground black because I had the cable on hand... alright I guess I will have to pull those two lines and redo them. Also I thought I needed a separate grounding electrode system for the garage but thank you for clarifying.
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