Help (JV, That Means You!) On 220 Line Conversion - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 10-16-2009, 01:19 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Help (JV, that means you!) on 220 line conversion


Okay, so I am dissecting the wiring ($#@^#!) on this home and have found that the builder spliced into a 220v dryer line, to run power across the garage ceiling and through the garage wall, capping the wires at an external box. I would LOVE to use this box to source the power at 110 for two outside (in the middle of the garden) outlets I want to install. Is there any special way that I can use this 220 line and decrease it to 110?
dpcowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-16-2009, 02:53 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 61
Rewards Points: 75
Default


I have yet see a setup as you describe. It's a dedicated service for a dryer and should remain such (probably a 30a line). The only way you could safely use the line is to come off it with a subpanel with breakers or fuses suited to the load you indicated -- if the line has a Neutral along with it (i.e., 120v on either side of neutral). I don't think that's code and I would not do it that way.
oilseal is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-16-2009, 03:33 PM   #3
Electrical Contractor
 
kbsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Delmarva
Posts: 3,368
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


You have stumbled across a major violation, and you want to continue to use and/or expand it?

How about removing the offending splice, and then run a new circuit if you want a new outside outlet?
__________________
-KB

Life is uncertain -- eat dessert first!!
kbsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-16-2009, 03:48 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


Stove circuits are spliced to serve cooktops & ovens
I understand that a circuit for a dryer could also be spliced
A 2nd dryer, another outlet - maybe to connect an RV

220.54 Calculated load for dryers shall be 5000w or actual nameplate whichever is larger

But I don't know of any way to take that & split it
Other then a small sub - which I'm not sure would be to code
Are there 3 wires or 4 wires?
Do you have an electric dryer?



Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2009, 08:09 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 8,697
Rewards Points: 3,000
Default


The "240 volt line" must have a white conductor in order to be converted outright to 120 volt usage. Any 120 volt usage relying on the ground for return current must be discontinued.

In order to have ordinary receptacles or lights connected to it, either a subpanel must be used or the entire line breakered at no more than 20 amps.
__________________
Stop some of your bank autopayments so you can set priorities for manual monthly payments out of your coronavirus stimulus check.

Last edited by AllanJ; 10-17-2009 at 08:19 AM.
AllanJ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2009, 10:53 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default


No, I don't want to risk ANYTHING here. I would always rather redo the work and do it right. The builder of this home built several in this area and was/is a County Building Inspector/Supervisor who got the "nod-nod, wink-wink" from his fellow inspectors when building these spec homes. The 220 electrical dryer line was spliced and wire was run from the splice over 50 feet and then terminated with caps outside the garage. My question is whether I can adapt this 220v wire (safely) to run power out to a garden area (another 100 feet) where I want to install two outdoor receptacles. Seems like my best practice would be to correct the dryer line splice, leave that 220v line to itself, and hook up new power (110) through the circuit breaker...does this seem right? Or can I somehow convert that 220v wire run and splice it in a way to use 110? (again, safely!)
dpcowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2009, 10:55 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


How many wires are in the 240v run ?



Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2009, 11:00 AM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Scuba Dave,
Yes, there is a dryer...and it is the dryer 220v line that is spliced....actually, there are 7 wires exiting the garage terminus and going into an electrical conduit below the ground...(2 black, 2 red, orange, green, and white!). Any advice?
dpcowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2009, 11:12 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


If you can find out what he did & what he wired it for that would be #1

Since you have a dryer I'd leave that existing wire alone
I'd leave the existing garage connection, I haven't found anything in the code that prohibits splicing.

So I'd run new wire for 2 outside outlets
I ran 2 conduits - (1) 1/2" & the other 3/4" out to my garden for my Christmas display

What power draw is going to be on the outside outlets?

You go into many home garage workshops & there are multipe 240v outlets all running off the same circuit to power different tools
The idea being that the homeowner will not be using multiple tools at once & surpass the breaker/wire capacity

With that many wires you could possibly drop a small sub with 2 breakers & run 2 circuits
But I wouldn't do it unless I knew what all the wires were connected to & why



Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2009, 12:16 PM   #10
Member
 
J. V.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4,129
Rewards Points: 348
Default


Dave, you are correct that splices and taps are not always a violation. Including this one. As long as the splice was made in an appropriate enclosure (box) and the wire is the same size, there is nothing wrong with it.

OP. Leave the 220 volt circuit as is. You may find a use for that box outside one day.
Run a new cable for the 120 volt circuits you require.
__________________
If it worked before you worked on it. You did something wrong.
J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sewer line Master Brian Plumbing 3 05-25-2009 12:53 AM
Add natural gas line Tukeeman Plumbing 11 12-01-2008 07:53 AM
electric line and gas line couch potatoe Electrical 17 09-30-2008 10:43 PM
GFI will not reset will line is hot soccerdude Electrical 15 09-07-2008 01:11 PM
Condensate Line schott HVAC 17 06-02-2008 03:16 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts