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Old 07-20-2009, 02:09 PM   #1
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Grounding barn slabs


Does anyone know if it is necessary to ground the slab next to my barn? How would I do it?
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Old 07-20-2009, 02:17 PM   #2
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You sometimes use the rebar in a footing as a ground for the electrical service, but you don't ground slabs.
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Old 07-20-2009, 02:42 PM   #3
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If I was pouring a slab and was using rebar, I would install a UFER. Search UFER on this site. You may need it one day and it is very easy to do if you do it now. It will come in handy should you build anything on this slab and want power there.
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Old 07-20-2009, 02:50 PM   #4
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I guess I wasn't clear enough. I've heard that when you have livestock that stand or walk on slabs that have steel in them, the slabs have to be grounded, especially if their is electrical servive in the building, barn, etc. attached to the slab. I believe it is for protection for the animals. Something about ther acute sensistivity to current because all four feet are on the ground and any current passes through their heart. I'm wondering if I have to ground to the panel or a ufer.

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Old 07-20-2009, 03:07 PM   #5
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I've never heard of the livestock/grounding thing. Sounds like BS to me....but I'm a city boy


Quote:
I'm wondering if I have to ground to the panel or a ufer.
Look at you panel and see if there is a big, probably bare copper wire running out of it into the ground/concrete.

It is used to allegedly give lightning a path to ground (as opposed to it going into your electrical system and coming out of your stove )
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Old 07-20-2009, 03:34 PM   #6
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547.10(A)(2)


(2) Outdoors.
Equipotential planes shall be installed in
concrete slabs where metallic equipment is located that
may become energized and is accessible to livestock.
The equipotential plane shall encompass the area where
the livestock stands while accessing metallic equipment
that may become energized.

547.10 ... "the term livestock shall not include poultry."
So fried chicken is OK, but fried pork rinds ain't.



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Old 07-20-2009, 04:15 PM   #7
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zpm - multiple thanks yous.
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Old 07-20-2009, 10:17 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R_T View Post
I guess I wasn't clear enough. I've heard that when you have livestock that stand or walk on slabs that have steel in them, the slabs have to be grounded, especially if their is electrical servive in the building, barn, etc. attached to the slab. I believe it is for protection for the animals. Something about ther acute sensistivity to current because all four feet are on the ground and any current passes through their heart. I'm wondering if I have to ground to the panel or a ufer.

Thanks
I think this is primarily for dairies where there are automatic milkers. In this case, the ground potential is very critical. Unless your cow is into S&M, it won't like a poorly grounded slab/
If you just have a slab that your cows stand on out of the rain while they eat, I don't think it's that big a deal.
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Old 07-21-2009, 11:28 AM   #9
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You never mentioned livestock in your original post. Yes, there are electrical precautions for livestock. Namely GFCI protection. I would install the simple UFER if you plan to put a panel in this area. If no panel, then a GFCI breaker or receptacle would be all you need.
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Old 07-21-2009, 04:07 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R_T View Post
Does anyone know if it is necessary to ground the slab next to my barn? How would I do it?
Not sure where this would fit in.
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...s/strayvol.htm

Gary
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