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Old 05-29-2015, 01:32 PM   #1
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Ground Loop


Hello. I live in Arizona and looking to locate the Ground Cable or Rod in my home.

I am getting static sounds or static buzzing sounds coming from my stereo receiver. I need to locate the ground cable around the house somewhere so I can tighten or clean the ground cable better. The problem is that I don't know where the ground rod or pole is located outside my house.

I will post some pictures in a little while and maybe someone can tell me which picture is where the ground wire is located.

Thanks!
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Old 05-29-2015, 02:00 PM   #2
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Please see pictures below:














Last edited by Landia; 05-29-2015 at 02:01 PM. Reason: Error
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Old 05-29-2015, 02:03 PM   #3
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I am thinking the Ground Cable for the house is the LAST picture because there is a white cable hanging out. But the white cable does not seem like it is connect to anything. It's just hanging out.
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Old 05-29-2015, 02:59 PM   #4
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That white wire is definitely not your ground wire. It is most likely a tracer wire to assist in locating plastic gas pipe under ground.

You may not have ground rods at all. In some areas of Arizona, the concrete encased electrode (aka Ufer) is common.
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Old 05-29-2015, 04:06 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oso954 View Post
That white wire is definitely not your ground wire. It is most likely a tracer wire to assist in locating plastic gas pipe under ground.

You may not have ground rods at all. In some areas of Arizona, the concrete encased electrode (aka Ufer) is common.

Thank you for your help!
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Old 05-29-2015, 09:25 PM   #6
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Most likely you are barking up the wrong tree.

Before you dig into your GEC system, look at your system setup. Do you have all your equipment on the same circuit? If not or you don't know, try this....get an extension cord and connect all equipment of your system to that extension. And I mean ALL equipment that is interconnected in any way, such as by speaker cords, video and audio connections, etc.

If buzzing and humming disappears you have diagnosed your problem and found your ground loop.
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Old 05-29-2015, 10:27 PM   #7
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There's a greater chance that a power supply of one of the pieces in your audio setup is dieing a slow death. This is the biggest source of "buzzing" in interconnected systems. If connecting all of the equipment to the same ground, like DanS26 mentioned doesn't work, this is your prob. (I'd also try different power cables if possible. If the buzzing does go away, it's a loose ground somewhere. Optical cable will help, since it's isolating and digital, but only until the offending power supply gets worse. (then it'll be all the time whether connected or not.) Good luck!
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Old 05-30-2015, 12:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanS26 View Post
Most likely you are barking up the wrong tree.

Before you dig into your GEC system, look at your system setup. Do you have all your equipment on the same circuit? If not or you don't know, try this....get an extension cord and connect all equipment of your system to that extension. And I mean ALL equipment that is interconnected in any way, such as by speaker cords, video and audio connections, etc.

If buzzing and humming disappears you have diagnosed your problem and found your ground loop.
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Originally Posted by supers05 View Post
There's a greater chance that a power supply of one of the pieces in your audio setup is dieing a slow death. This is the biggest source of "buzzing" in interconnected systems. If connecting all of the equipment to the same ground, like DanS26 mentioned doesn't work, this is your prob. (I'd also try different power cables if possible. If the buzzing does go away, it's a loose ground somewhere. Optical cable will help, since it's isolating and digital, but only until the offending power supply gets worse. (then it'll be all the time whether connected or not.) Good luck!
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Old 05-30-2015, 04:44 AM   #9
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If you are getting Ground Loop Hum, most likely it is coming from a poorly grounded CATV Static Block, or the CATV system is not up to par for the company that owns it. The other would be that you have wiring in the house that is causing the hum, because of poor wiring methods (Back Stabbed outlets).

This is the best guide out there on grounding and a/v gear. http://www.lightningsafety.com/nlsi_lhm/IEEE_Guide.pdf

There is also the case that someone or maybe yourself have created the ground hum by grounding any splitters through Surge Protection strips, or by their self to a ground point. The only item that needs grounded for CATV or Satellite, is the outside Static Block. The Telephone NID also needs to be grounded to the same house ground (ie Ufer or rod), as the CATV or Satellite.

There is a lot of mis-information out there. Especially on AVSforum.



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Old 05-30-2015, 04:47 AM   #10
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Actually the picture with the NID & Electric meter that is not shown in Picture 2, would be where the utilities should be connecting to the Ufer ground in the slab.

OP start clearing that rock away by hand and use a Dandelion hand popper to clear the dirt, to find the Split Nut bolt, that attaches the Telephone ground to the Ufer.



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Old 05-30-2015, 08:28 AM   #11
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You want to connect an independent ground wire, daisy chaining among the various components of your stereo and, if interconnected, your video/theater system.

The simplest way to do this is to get a length of bare #14 copper wire and attach it to each component using one of these methods or similar:
1. Undo one of the screws that hold the stereo component cabinet together and that penetrates to the metal chassis. Loop the wire around the screw and retighten.
2. Using an RCA plug cut from a bad audio cable and bent to an appropriate shape using long nose pliers, hold the wire to the outer shell of an unused RCA input or output jack in back of the stereo component.

Include in the daisy chain AC powered (having AC cord) speakers and subwoofers but exclude unpowered speakers (nothing but speaker cable attached). Ideally all cable TV or satellite TV accessories or telephone equipment (modem, etc.) connected to the AC power line and to the stereo equipment should be included in the daisy chain although you may choose to omit components situated at a distance while you evaluate how well the problem got fixed without including these.

The far end of the wire should be connected to a known ground. The screw holding the cover plate on a grounded wall receptacle will suffice for this purpose.

Should the ground wire need to be spliced or T-connectioned, soldering or a wire nut or a clamp or a crimp ring is needed. Simply twisting together is not good enough.

If y ou have several ground rods about the house being used for different or various purposes, then all need to be interconnected using #6 copper wire (and approved clamps). Such #6 wire you need to add should run as much as possible outside the house. (There are a few obscure exceptions that are a little too off-topic to mention here.)
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Last edited by AllanJ; 05-30-2015 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:31 AM   #12
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Last edited by AllanJ; 05-30-2015 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:41 AM   #13
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Crossed circuits and standing neutral to ground faults are common for causing this in properly functioning audio equipment.

Most homes have at least one standing ground fault.

Moving everything to one dedicated circuit or isolation transformer often works.


Biggest misconception is that ground has anything to do with this. Soil has no magical properties and rarely does it change the way anything works.

Last edited by Jump-start; 05-30-2015 at 09:03 AM.
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Old 05-30-2015, 09:11 AM   #14
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It is possible you may find that a water pipe exiting the house underground is the one and only grounding electrode. It would be connected to the panel neutral bus bar in the same manner as you will need to connect at least one ground rod except in some cases you need #4 copper wire instead of #6 as the grounding electrode conductor. (I don't have the wire size table handy.)

No wires for grounding of electrical or electronic equipment should be connected to gas pipes. Unhook any you may find with the exception of one #6 or so wire (bonding jumper) from the gas plumbing to the similarly sized grounding electrode conductor from the panel to a ground rod or water pipe.

A concrete encased electrode (below grade concrete rebar), loosely refereed to as a Ufer electrode, counts as a ground rod. Trace any fat (#6 etc.) bare wires (which may be grounding electrode conductors) running from your panel neutral bus out of the panel to see where they go.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 05-30-2015 at 09:26 AM.
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Old 05-30-2015, 09:21 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
It is possible you may find that a water pipe exiting the house underground is the one and only grounding electrode. It would be connected to the panel neutral bus bar in the same manner as you will need to connect at least one ground rod except in some cases you need #4 copper wire instead of #6 as the grounding electrode conductor. (I don't have the wire size table handy.)

No wires for grounding of electrical or electronic equipment should be connected to gas pipes. Unhook any you may find with the exception of one #6 or so wire (bonding jumper) from the gas plumbing to the similarly sized grounding electrode conductor from the panel to a ground rod or water pipe.
Connecting the equipment to a separate "ground" will do nothing, possibly create danger.
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