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Old 07-05-2009, 11:05 AM   #1
 
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GFCI Pigtail


I have to get power to a GFCI recepticle and a switch/plug after the recepticle that doesn't need to be protected. Can I run power to the GFCI box pigtail the power to the recepticle and continue the power?
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Old 07-05-2009, 11:12 AM   #2
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Yes you can You can also put both under line side of gfci (Most gfci have place for two wires to go under, pigtail the wires is prob best)
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Old 07-05-2009, 12:25 PM   #3
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The pigtail will work provided you have sufficient depth behind the GFCI in the box.
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Old 07-05-2009, 06:20 PM   #4
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Here is a pic of the built-in pigtail on most GFCI's

Love those compression connections
.
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GFCI Pigtail-gfci-back.jpg  
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Old 07-05-2009, 06:43 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaliBob View Post
Here is a pic of the built-in pigtail on most GFCI's

Love those compression connections
.
This (method of "pigtailing" through back compression connection) is a wonderful add-on and saves precious space when installing GFCI receptacles.
Before that, you had to "Double-up" on the LINE terminals.Don't Drink and Drive!!!
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Old 07-05-2009, 10:14 PM   #6
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I don't believe that is considered pigtailing. Correct me if I am wrong, but pigtailing is an individual wire to each device wirenutted to the feed coming into the box. It is common practice where I am from, not saying it is a better way, but that's how I like it. The neutral wire has to be pigtailed. Using the device as a splice for the neutral is against the NEC. Too easy to burn up equiptment.
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Old 07-05-2009, 10:27 PM   #7
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"LEGAL" definition "Pigtailing"


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Originally Posted by jbberns View Post
I don't believe that is considered pigtailing. Correct me if I am wrong, but pigtailing is an individual wire to each device wirenutted to the feed coming into the box. It is common practice where I am from, not saying it is a better way, but that's how I like it. The neutral wire has to be pigtailed. Using the device as a splice for the neutral is against the NEC. Too easy to burn up equiptment.
Strictly from a "technical" point you're right. But when there is not enough space inside the box, this is a fine wiring method. Generally. I prefer PIGTAILING a/o to the Daisy-Chain method.Don't Drink and Drive!!!
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Old 07-05-2009, 10:39 PM   #8
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I did see your quotes and figured that's what you ment Spark plug. But I do always recommend pigtailing the neutral.
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Old 07-06-2009, 05:34 AM   #9
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Good point on what is "legal definition" Pigtailing vs a "pseudo" compression device Pigtail.

But then a code approved push-in connector

http://www.idealindustries.com/media...e_brochure.pdf

used as a simple legal pigtail requires at least a 3 port connector with Three connection points, where the GFCI pseudo pigtail uses Two. From a reliability view I prefer the GFCI pseudo pigtail where I trust in a solid mechanical connection through the GFCI internal one piece jumper bar.

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Last edited by PaliBob; 07-06-2009 at 05:49 AM. Reason: sp
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Old 07-06-2009, 06:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbberns View Post
..... Correct me if I am wrong.... The neutral wire has to be pigtailed. Using the device as a splice for the neutral is against the NEC. Too easy to burn up equiptment.
This only applies to multi-wire circuits.

You are permitted to use wiring devices as neutral splices on 2-wire circuits.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:03 AM   #11
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Ok KBsparky, from what I've seen from you, you seem to have some good knowledge. I do mostly commercial, so sometimes I don't always know the best way for residential or common practice. thanks
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Old 07-06-2009, 10:25 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbberns View Post
Ok KBsparky, from what I've seen from you, you seem to have some good knowledge. I do mostly commercial, so sometimes I don't always know the best way for residential or common practice. thanks

See 300.13(B). Applies to residential, commercial, and industrial. You need only pigtail MWBC at main junction boxs before splitting off to individual circuits. All individual 2 wire circuits do not require pigtails.
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:18 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbberns View Post
Ok KBsparky, from what I've seen from you, you seem to have some good knowledge. I do mostly commercial, so sometimes I don't always know the best way for residential or common practice. thanks
Thanks for the compliment. As Code05 stated, you only have to pigtail the neutral conductors where it is part of a Multi-Wire Branch Circuit. Once the circuits have been split into their respective downstream 2-wire branches, pigtailing is no longer required.
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Old 07-11-2009, 08:46 AM   #14
 
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You guys lost me at hello. I want to run a live wire into a box. Wire nut another wire that will go to light fixtures with the live & 3 small pieces of wire (green, black, white) that will feed the GFI. I thought this was called pigtail but now I'm not sure

Can I do this?
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Old 07-11-2009, 12:41 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeyP View Post
I thought this was called pigtail but now I'm not sure
Pigtail has come to mean different things to different folks. It is used as both a noun and as a verb. I take it to refer to mean the short conductor from a device, that is used to connect (e.g.Wirenut) with other conductors.

I think it is confusing to use "Pigtail" as a verb .Although the word "pigtail" has no definition in the code, it is not the same as "connect". When you connect two or more wires, you do not pigtail them, you just connect them.

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Last edited by PaliBob; 07-11-2009 at 03:10 PM. Reason: sp
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