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Old 09-12-2010, 11:19 PM   #1
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Garage Wiring new service


Hi, I just bought a house and we are running power to the garage and getting told 100 different things can you all please help me?

I am going to put a 100amp 220v panel in the garage, It is a 90 ft wire. The panel in the house has the room and is grounded correctly.

I am going to run copper THHN/THWN in condit 1 1/4, I was told to run 3 #2 and a 1 # 6 for a ground is this correct? I think #2 is overkill? I was also told due to the ground being #6 it has to be green by code and cant be remarked. Do i need to reground with a grounding rod or is the house ground enough?

The 100amp ge panel i bought has a neutral bridge to a the ground bar should this be removed?

All the city would tell us is to go by the 2009 nec codes and call us when your done but i dont want them coming out and saying this is wrong or that after spending big bucks on wire... Im in ohio if that helps.

Anyone please comment all help would be great i plan to go buy everything tomorrow.

Thanks in advance.

Last edited by alfieferenzo84; 09-12-2010 at 11:21 PM.
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Old 09-13-2010, 12:37 AM   #2
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#2 wire sounds about right, though I'm not 100% certain, especially with the voltage drop over 90 feet. #6 is readily available in green, no problems there. You are correct that you can't remark another color #6 as a ground.

You will need two ground rods at the garage, connected to the ground bar on the new panel.

Yes, you must have separate bars for neutral and ground in the sub-panel. You must also make sure that the neutral bar is not bonded to the box. There was probably a green bonding screw included with the panel, don't install it.

If it's like the 100 Amp GE panel I was working with a couple weeks ago, you can either remove the jumper between the two neutral/ground bars, or you can leave them both as neutral bars and install add-in ground bars, whichever seems neater to you. Again, make sure the neutral bar is *not* bonded to the box, and the ground bar *is* bonded to the box.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:02 AM   #3
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Thanks mcsteve, The 2 bars are bonded and that can be removed, Also came with a screw to bond the bar to the box. I will bond the ground to the box and leave the neutral not bonded to anything.

I will install 2 grounding rods outside. Do these need to be so far apart?

Also i am seeing its code that all the outlets besides lights and door openner to be on a gfci circuit is this true?

The garage is unfinshed does the wire inside going to outlets need to be in condit or can it just run in the studs as long as it dont go on the surface? - meaning drilled into studs.. Another tricky subject
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:13 AM   #4
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I can't remember off the top of my head, but I think the two ground rods should be about 6' apart.

There's no exception for garage door openers anymore in the the 2008 NEC, so that has to be GFCI as well. I used a GFCI breaker for mine, so I wouldn't have to reach up to the ceiling to reset a trip.

For cable in unfinished garage walls, I'm honestly not sure. I would definitely avoid running it horizontally through the studs without providing some kind of running board in front of it. I ran all my romex up through the rafters, and then vertically down the studs to each outlet and switch box. The idea is to keep it safe from damage, and especially prevent people from hanging things on it.

Oh, and I don't know if it's a local thing or not, but here in Minnesota at least we need to use tamper-resistant receptacles even in garages.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:23 AM   #5
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oh wow all of them...

6ft so do they need condit then or just run them bare or do they need to be thhn wire as well in condit???

Hey thanks for the help mcsteve
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Old 09-13-2010, 08:14 AM   #6
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The last code cycle was NEC 2008
Who told you to run #2 ?
#3 wire is OK for 100a at the distance you are running
#6 wire must be green, can't be remarked black
I would use 1.5" unless you are going to an electric supply for parts
Big box stores have limited supply of 1 1/4" pipe/attachments

2 ground rods at least 6' apart...conduit needed to protect bare wire going into the ground in most areas

Quote:
The 100amp ge panel i bought has a neutral bridge to a the ground bar should this be removed?
Yes remove this
Only the grounds should be grounded to the case
Neutrals & grounds on seperate bars

All outlets on GFCI in a garage & must be TR
I'm putting a normal outlet up high, then protecting it with a GFCI outlet lower were I can easily reset it
We will have 2 doors & openers & they will be on seperate circuits -my preference

Wire must be protected from physical damage
Usually in the stud bay meets that requirement - running along the stud



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Old 09-13-2010, 07:36 PM   #7
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well no one had #3 so i had to go with #2 but they ran out of #2 so i have
0/01- 2-2-6 ground is green and the rest are black remarked.

Will be installing breakers and inside wire tomarrow Thanks for your help so far

1 thing my panel in the house is only 150amp does it need to be upgraded to 200amp? The panel in the garage is 100amp...
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:47 PM   #8
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A whole house load calc tells you if you have enough power for your house & needs

You could only upgrade it to 200a IF:
All wire, meter equipment etc is rated for 200a
POCO may be able to tell you if their feed is good for 200a
Or an electrician....usually main feed/meter etc upgrade is not a DIY task



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Old 09-13-2010, 07:59 PM   #9
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i dont think i will use more then 18amps in garage lol... just thinking code
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