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Old 09-03-2010, 01:54 PM   #1
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Garage Wiring


Hello! I have used these forums a lot, but finally have a question of my own.

My garage has walls up right now, and I'd like to put up a ceiling and finish the garage. I need to do some electrical work first.

I have a garage door opener, a ceiling light, and a back door light, and 1 outlet. I'd like to split the ceiling light into 2 lights on each side of the garage. I also would like to add 2 outlets, 1 on each wall of the garage.

My question is simple, is this too much for the 1 breaker going to the garage? I won't use all of the outlets at once, but I am unsure if it is acceptable to put all this on 1 circuit, or if its against code.

Thank you!
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Old 09-03-2010, 02:00 PM   #2
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There is nothing to prevent you from doing this on one circuit. If it were me I would make it 2 circuits, one lighting and one receptacle circuit.

The receptacles will need GFI protection.
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Old 09-03-2010, 02:09 PM   #3
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I am not opposed to doing it the easy way and just putting everything on the circuit that is already there, I was just wondering if it would be against code, or too much. The wire that comes into the garage now comes through the attic, and it would be a pain of a job to run another one to the garage.

I was also planning on putting GFCI outlets out there, I'm going to pick up a contractor box, because some of the ones in my house need to be GFCI as well that currently aren't.

Thanks for the quick response, Jim.
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Old 09-03-2010, 03:16 PM   #4
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What size circuit is it? 15 or 20 amps?
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Old 09-03-2010, 03:37 PM   #5
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I would look into the possibility of adding a sub panel. You might want more power later on. If you don't want to do that now, but see that it's possible, what I would do is have several "circuits" leading to a big junction box where a panel could potentially go. At least that way in the future you can go ahead and add a panel and individualize those into different circuits. The stove plug boxes with an extender would make a good jbox for something like this.
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Old 09-03-2010, 03:51 PM   #6
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Pop the breaker & the garage door will not open
No code against it in the US
Canada has restrictions on how many outlets/fixtures can be on a circuit
Its best to do it right before the walls & ceilings are finished
Rather then take the easy way out

Where are you located ?
Attached garage since fed thru the attic ?
Is there a fire rated wall between the garage & house ?
....extending up to the roof ?



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Old 09-03-2010, 04:08 PM   #7
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There won't be anything on when I need to use the garage door opener, so I have no worry about that. I doubt I will ever pop a breaker in the garage. I just want more than 1 outlet in the garage so I don't have to use an extension cord for everything.

The walls in the garage are already finished, it's attached to the house, and there is a firewall from floor to ceiling on the side attached to the house, and I live in Ohio.

From my perspective it's not the easy way out. I wouldn't have much more trouble running a second circuit out to the garage, but I don't forsee it ever being needed. I was more or less curious as to if doing so would be against code.
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Old 09-03-2010, 04:39 PM   #8
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Is the garage the only thing on this circuit?
Based on the NEC, with the few exceptions on kitchens and bath, you can have as many receptacles on a circuit as you want.
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:04 PM   #9
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And what more you can have quite few circuits in attached garage but nice gotcha make sure all the 120 volt circuits are RCD { GFCI } protected but becarefull when you go thru the firewall make sure you seal up the holes if that the case.

Merci.
Marc
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:01 AM   #10
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Okay so I did a little bit of digging and found some other things to be on the circuit as well. It also seems like it will be fairly easy for me to run a new circuit out to the garage, so this is the route I'm going to take.

I would like to put 3 outlets in, 1 on each wall, and a new motion light on the outside front of my garage. When I bring in the wire, what is the best way of splitting it off to each other box? I've been told you can run the wire in and out of each box without cutting it, then strip the wire (still not cutting it) and just loop it onto the outlets. What other way would be acceptable?
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:55 AM   #11
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The walls in my garage are already finished, so I am going to be cutting the outlets out and fishing the wire through. It would be easier to fish the wire up the wall from the outlet. Would be ok to bring the main wire into the garage and put a box on the ceiling and the split that off 4 ways, 1 to each outlet and 1 to the light?

And also, is there a code of how high off the ground the outlets need to be on the walls?
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Old 09-11-2010, 03:07 PM   #12
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No code required height in a residential garage.

You can use the ceiling mounted junction to split the cables in different directions. It just needs to stay permanently accessible and closed with a blank cover plate.

I would considered the looping method a very poor way to install any wiring.
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Old 09-11-2010, 07:46 PM   #13
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Thanks for the response. If I do it in the ceiling box, what is the correct way to split it 4 ways? Is using a larger wire nut and putting all 5 wires in it acceptable? And if I put a drywall ceiling up, the box must stay accessible through it?
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:01 PM   #14
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When you sell, you'll probably have to fill out a disclosure form for property condition. Most of them ask if any work has been done without required permits. Permits are cheap and if you come in with notes and drawings most inspectors are really happy to give you a LOT of free advice. I always keep my electric work legal and later when I sell it is easy to be honest on the form. Also gives a bit of extra lawsuit protection to go by the rules.

Anyway sounds like you might not have brought the feed to the garage yet. If so, and if you will be running conduit, consider using a much larger conduit than your one circuit needs. Makes for easy upgrades later.

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Old 09-11-2010, 08:05 PM   #15
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What is required for a permit? Do I have to have a county inspector come out? I've done a bit of electrical work before and am confident in doing this with no problem, but would feel better to do it the right way.
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