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Old 01-11-2010, 04:18 PM   #1
 
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Extension cord & gauge


Is there any advantage using a 5 foot extension cord from the wall to a 110V appliance using 12, 10 or 8 gauge to make the extension cord?
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Old 01-11-2010, 04:28 PM   #2
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NO
The cable behind the wall that feeds your outlet is 14 or 12 gauge.
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Old 01-11-2010, 04:31 PM   #3
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With short heavy extension cords, contact resistance at the plug and socket at each end is more of an issue than the wire resistance.
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Old 01-11-2010, 04:41 PM   #4
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There is a thing called "voltage drop" with longer distances. But 5 ft. is a short distance, so not much difference. (With 12 ga. being the smallest as you said and 120 volt regular outlet 20 or 15 amps.)

For longer distances, I like to buy the largest gauge extension cords I can find. (Contractor cords which cost a pretty penny!)

In general electrical things are "happier" with a larger gauge wire. This has less "resistance".

Then also a factor is the plugs on the extension cord and the largest size wire you can use with those specific plugs. Look at the specifications for the plugs. (I like the good quality industrial grade plugs - male/female, but these cost a fortune lately!)

Also best to use stranded wire for an extension cord. This can take a lot of moving and bending without the wire breaking.
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Old 01-11-2010, 04:43 PM   #5
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What is the appliance ?
A heater or high wattage device a heavier cord is better, but I would not go over 12g
14g is good for up to 1800w
A heater it is best to NOT use an extension cord



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Old 01-11-2010, 04:59 PM   #6
 
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extension cord gauge


Thanks for your quick response. The appliance is a home audio system. I have been told that using a 8 gauge wire makes the electricity travel faster and keep the amp cooler. I find that hard to believe since home wiring is based on 60 cycles and can't go faster or slower. Going up one gauge from 12 to 10 may make the wire better for amperage, but matching the wire at 12 gauge should probably be optimal in an extension cord to an audio system. What do you think?
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Old 01-11-2010, 05:09 PM   #7
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Are they selling you a bridge too ?
Sounds like a stupid salesman

How much power does the amp pull ?



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Old 01-11-2010, 05:37 PM   #8
 
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I side-stepped the bridge from him. I thought the same thing. The amp will pull about 3 amps.
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Old 01-11-2010, 05:45 PM   #9
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3a you are fine with smaller cords = 360w
14g, 16g



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Old 01-11-2010, 06:19 PM   #10
 
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extension cord gauge


Thanks for the responses. Have a great New Year.
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:12 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djp74 View Post
I have been told that using a 8 gauge wire makes the electricity travel faster and keep the amp cooler.
Can go only 60 cycles a second in the US, 50 cycles a second in Europe.
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