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Old 03-04-2009, 08:13 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Piedmont View Post
Although expanding foam will likely work (it's self extinguishing and often used as a fireblocking material... I think other posters are referring to the XPS and EPS (eXtruded and Expanding polystyrene which is very flammable). I recommend putting flame to a piece of polyurethane expanding foam such as the stuff coming out of "Great Stuff" on fire, I've tried, the second you pull the flame away the fire goes out.
Doesn't look like it burns to me.
The fireblocking foam is on the left, regular great stuff on the right.
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Old 03-04-2009, 09:39 AM   #17
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I thought that fire blocking was to seal air flow between a chase in which fire can spread. Wood blocking is ofter used. This burns also.
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:23 PM   #18
 
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The model number for the trim is T49 Airtight Baffle Trim which is made by Commercial Electric (Home Depot store brand, I guess). I purchased this trim to make my old cans more air tight. I just saw your post today, hope this is not too late to be of help to you!
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Old 01-10-2010, 10:57 PM   #19
 
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Use Compact Florescents in Your Can Lights, Then Foam Them


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Originally Posted by INDixie View Post
The model number for the trim is T49 Airtight Baffle Trim which is made by Commercial Electric (Home Depot store brand, I guess). I purchased this trim to make my old cans more air tight. I just saw your post today, hope this is not too late to be of help to you!

It was too late, but that's Ok--I improvised. Once I got up in the attic and really started messing around, I realized the cans were mounted too close to the rafters to add any sort of baffle to them anyway. Here's what we did....

First, I disagree with the person who said that the holes are small and can't make that much of a difference. If you add up the space of ALL of the holes in the can and imagine drilling a single hole in the side of your wall that (combined) size, it's a BIG hole. The previous owners of our house put in 26 can lights in the great room of our house. So multiply that hole size by 26 and it's like leaving a window open! In order for the electrician to install them, they removed the insulation over ALL of those lights so that about 500 square feet of our primary living space has NO insulation AT ALL. (Black asphalt shingles in Oklahoma--hot in the summer, cold in the winter. Argh!) In addition, we have loose cellulose and chopped fiberglass (fiberglass was NOT MY CHOICE--it was here when we moved here) in the attic and I didn't like the idea of dust coming down through those holes either.

So, our solution..... The can lights are "IC" lights. I inquired at the lighting store and they said that as long as the lights had 75 watt or less bulbs in them, they were fine to have insulation right up against them. So we removed all of the existing flood light bulbs and replaced them with 15 watt (I think--maybe less) compact florescent flood light bulbs. We will ALWAYS keep compact florescent bulbs in them (and we have no plans to move in the next 25 years--this is our retirement farm). Then I went into the attic and sprayed a can (one per light) of expanding Great Foam over each can light, sealing up all holes.

This solution might not appeal to everyone, but I think it's fine for us. We have a longer-term plan that involves eventually replacing most of those lights and even insulating our attic differently so that the air leaks wouldn't matter (insulating the roof of the attic vs. the floor of the attic). If these can lights are still here when we sell the house, we'll tell the new owners to keep low wattage bulbs in them.

We made this change several months ago and have had no problems with overheating, lights burning out, etc. I bought the foam on sale, making this an inexpensive solution.
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Old 01-11-2010, 07:07 AM   #20
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An IC rated can can be sealed as you suggested (I do it all the time) and still use a regular bulb without overheating issues. The reason you use these cans is so you can insulate against them. The foam is the correct way to air seal the ceiling penetration and is done as a normal weatherization project.
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Old 01-13-2010, 01:04 AM   #21
 
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HI, I'm new to this forum, this is my first post. Recently while at Home Depot I asked what they had to insulate my ceiling pot lights. One of the "Orange apron guys" showed me some of the "new build" light fixtures. These fixtures had little squares of grey tape on the outside of the cans, over the holes. The tape was a little bit thicker than regular electrical tape. In addition, any of these type of lights that I have seen have a thermostatic device inside the can to turn the light off if it gets too hot. I was going to just use the metal tape that is used on A/C ducts to seal up the outside of the cans, & as someone suggested earlier in this thread, use low wattage bulbs or CFL's in the ones that don't have dimmers.
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Old 01-18-2010, 12:25 PM   #22
 
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HI, I'm new to this forum, this is my first post. Recently while at Home Depot I asked what they had to insulate my ceiling pot lights. One of the "Orange apron guys" showed me some of the "new build" light fixtures. These fixtures had little squares of grey tape on the outside of the cans, over the holes. The tape was a little bit thicker than regular electrical tape. In addition, any of these type of lights that I have seen have a thermostatic device inside the can to turn the light off if it gets too hot. I was going to just use the metal tape that is used on A/C ducts to seal up the outside of the cans, & as someone suggested earlier in this thread, use low wattage bulbs or CFL's in the ones that don't have dimmers.
I'll have to check those out. When I put cans in my bedroom, I wasn't too worried about escaping heat as I think a house should breath a bit anyway. A tightly sealed house is more energy efficient and more likely to make you ill - especially when someone in the house is already sick.
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Old 01-18-2010, 09:45 PM   #23
 
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Energy Efficiency vs. Air Quality is a False Dichotomy


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A tightly sealed house is more energy efficient and more likely to make you ill - especially when someone in the house is already sick.
This is a false dichotomy. One doesn't have to choose EITHER energy efficiency OR good indoor air quality. An energy efficient house that is built well--built properly--will also have good indoor air quality. An intentionally drafty house isn't smart--no matter what your justification--and certainly not best for sick people. Instead, the smart choice is to build a super-tight, energy efficient house and install an HRV or an ERV so that you're bringing a measured, appropriate amount of air into the house and, in the case of the HRV, that you're not losing energy in the process.

Another factor is to watch what pollutants you bring into the house in the first place--in cabinetry, furniture, carpeting, cleaning products, paints and varnishes, etc., so that you're not dirtying the air any more than necessary.

--Leslie
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Old 01-18-2010, 09:58 PM   #24
 
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Thank you!!


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Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
An IC rated can can be sealed as you suggested (I do it all the time) and still use a regular bulb without overheating issues. The reason you use these cans is so you can insulate against them. The foam is the correct way to air seal the ceiling penetration and is done as a normal weatherization project.
Thanks so much!! You have no idea how many people I asked about this and never could get anyone to give me a firm answer about this. Everyone seemed to be covering their behinds and reluctant to give me a straight answer on this.

--Leslie
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