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Old 08-01-2010, 11:52 PM   #1
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do all light fixtures need jboxes?


Hello,

I recently discovered an opening in my kitchen ceiling, behind a fluorescent light fixture that has probably been there for 10 or 15 years. We moved into this 1958 house 4 years ago, though the kitchen was remodeled in the 90's. I'm not sure if leaving this opening was left for a specific reason.

The light fixture has been screwed into the dry wall surrounding this opening (hole still visible) and there's no jbox for the wires, probably because the electrical connections are all being contained within the light fixture's compartment (you have to thread the wire through a ready-made hole in the light fixtures metal housing and make all your connections there next to the ballast; once connections are made there's a metal cover that goes over all the wires and the ballast).

Is this to code? Is it a fire hazard? Should I install a jbox or is this safe enough given the fact that all the connections are being made within the light fixture's compartment? I've actually already put some drywall over this hole and drilled a hole for the electrical wiring to exit the ceiling. After spending a half day doing this, it just came to me that I might not be following protocol and should cut a hole for a jbox. Seems unnecessary but I wanted to be sure for the sake of fire prevention.

Any advice is much appreciated! Thanks in advance.
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Old 08-02-2010, 12:18 AM   #2
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not all fixtures require a junction box. Your joints are within the fixture and as long as there is a proper cable connector to secure the cable where it enters the fixture, sounds like you are good to go.
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Old 08-02-2010, 07:24 AM   #3
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thank you


Thank you, nap! Much appreciated. Take care.
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Old 08-02-2010, 07:36 PM   #4
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The ballast can get quite hot. The wires coming out of the ballast use an insulation that can take the heat. Make sure your house wiring does not pass next to the ballast. This is especially true if it is older cable that only uses 60 decree C insulation.
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Old 08-04-2010, 07:03 AM   #5
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thank you, sleepydog! I will keep this in mind...
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