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Old 12-27-2009, 09:36 PM   #61
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I'm not seeing what you are seeing Marc. Now, I did see one thing more that is pertinent. It states the riser cannot exceed 30" above the roof if tree branches may fall on the wire.



Quote:
.Damage from tree on power lines-pg-e1.jpg
Quote:
Damage from tree on power lines-pg-e2.jpg

Quote:
Damage from tree on power lines-pg-e3.jpg
and you are 7 hours ahead of us? So, it is like 5:30 in the morning Monday morning there?
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Old 12-27-2009, 09:41 PM   #62
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Nap I will get a hold of my freind he live in Californine and he will have direct answer in there and I think you know him so Let me PM to see what he have to say on this one.

Yes I am 6 hours ahead and right now drinking coffee now{ from your time zone sorry }

It is 05:40 here

Merci,Marc
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Old 12-28-2009, 10:42 AM   #63
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My mistake.... it's actually 1 1/4 inch IMC, not 1 1/2 IMC (my hands aren't that big...). Sorry about that.

Btw, I don't see any 2 inch requirement. Table 6-5, and several other places, give various requirements based on 1 1/4 IMC, 1 1/2 IMC, etc., etc.

The deceased riser only rises about 15 to 18 inches above the roof and I don't see any reason to go any higher than about the minimum we can get away with---we're sure to get more branches and/or trees on the lines and the higher it rises, the more likely it'll get doubled over. As I read it, there is a 12 inch minimum to the insulator (Figure 6-39), and the previous configuration had the insulator about as close to the top as it would go. So maybe 18 inches is about right.

The PG&E guy is coming out to disconnect the lines soon. That thing has made me nervous for the past several days, so I'll be glad to see it disconnected. If nothing else, I guess we'll give out generator a workout...

Finally, I did find a compression coupling in the wall (see photo). It's about 7.5 feet down from the top (pretty much midway top-to-bottom).
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Old 12-28-2009, 11:21 AM   #64
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=Jeremy Hillary Boob, PhD;372960]My mistake.... it's actually 1 1/4 inch IMC, not 1 1/2 IMC (my hands aren't that big...). Sorry about that.
No biggie. I was just amazed at the accuracy you did achieve.

Quote:
Btw, I don't see any 2 inch requirement. Table 6-5, and several other places, give various requirements based on 1 1/4 IMC, 1 1/2 IMC, etc., etc.
I didn't either. Marc is trying to contact a guy from Cali that may provide some different support for his claim of 2" only.

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The deceased riser only rises about 15 to 18 inches above the roof and I don't see any reason to go any higher than about the minimum we can get away with-
-do not forget; any part of the wires must be at least 12 inches from the roof they are over. That drip loop can loop down quite far so be aware.

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-we're sure to get more branches and/or trees on the lines and the higher it rises, the more likely it'll get doubled over. As I read it, there is a 12 inch minimum to the insulator (Figure 6-39), and the previous configuration had the insulator about as close to the top as it would go. So maybe 18 inches is about right.
with the insulator at 12", you would quite likely cause the drip loop to be within 12 inches of the roof. I realize there is a slope that aids in the distance but again, be aware of the requirements.

Quote:
The PG&E guy is coming out to disconnect the lines soon. That thing has made me nervous for the past several days, so I'll be glad to see it disconnected. If nothing else, I guess we'll give out generator a workout...
good to hear of the back up.

Quote:
Finally, I did find a compression coupling in the wall (see photo). It's about 7.5 feet down from the top (pretty much midway top-to-bottom).
a sign of an electrician without proper tools. While a compression fitting may be acceptable, it is not as good as a threaded coupling but hey, resi guys do some strange things compared to what I do in commercial/industrial work.
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:00 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
-do not forget; any part of the wires must be at least 12 inches from the roof they are over. That drip loop can loop down quite far so be aware.

with the insulator at 12", you would quite likely cause the drip loop to be within 12 inches of the roof. I realize there is a slope that aids in the distance but again, be aware of the requirements.

a sign of an electrician without proper tools. While a compression fitting may be acceptable, it is not as good as a threaded coupling but hey, resi guys do some strange things compared to what I do in commercial/industrial work.
Yes, good point about the drip loop.

Wrt compression couplings, how difficult are they to remove? It seems to be cranked down very tight (in spite of which, it has obviously slipped a little bit on the bottom), but I don't want to mess with it until the service is disconnected.
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:08 PM   #66
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compression fittings: grab a couple of channel lock pliers and put one on the center and then unscrew the "nut" on the top with the other plier. You might have to rap on the pipe or fitting to get the ring loosened and the pipe should pull right out.
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Old 12-28-2009, 03:57 PM   #67
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The utility guy came out and cut the wires from the pole. I've removed the top section of the riser and now I'm wondering whether the wires need to be replaced. Two of them look fine, but the one in the picture below apparently took the brunt of the force. The covering has not been penetrated, but there was some abrasion. Do I need to replace this one? Do I need to replace them all? It's not that I'm lazy or even too cheap, it's just that it seems a waste to replace this big wire if it's not necessary, so I thought I'd ask the experts. Thanks.
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Old 12-28-2009, 04:02 PM   #68
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It's not that bad. I don't think you need to replace the cable. You should be able get a heat shrink that will go over that just to be sure. They make them for splicing butt splices.
Here is one example

http://www.wiringproducts.com/conten...d235.html#p897
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Old 12-28-2009, 04:05 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by joed View Post
It's not that bad. I don't think you need to replace the cable. You should be able get a heat shrink that will go over that just to be sure. They make them for splicing butt splices.
Here is one example

http://www.wiringproducts.com/conten...d235.html#p897
That would be awesome. It is the kind of thing they are likely to have at The Home Despot?
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Old 12-28-2009, 04:31 PM   #70
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Don't know. HD might carry a cheaper version. Make sure it has the sealing goo if they carry it and a 600 volt rating.
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Old 12-28-2009, 07:25 PM   #71
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I did get ahold of my freind from Californine and he say it can use 1 1/2 inch only with 2/0 { 70mm˛) conductors any bigger than that it have to use 2 inches conduit.

1 1/4 is too small for triconductors espcally with 70mm˛{2/0}

But I am not too crazy with compression fitting in the wall but you will need pretty big channellock pilers to get it unscrew it as Nap did describing it pretty clear.

Normally all the periscope riser I useally use 2 inch ridge conduit aka thickwall conduit.

The other thing you have to watch out is the span height requirement you have to keep at least min of 12 feet most useally ask for 15 feet or more on the lowest part of span so keep it in your mind when the POCO will restring it up and they will check the clearance and make any adjustment as need to.

With a small ding on the insulationg you can use shrink tube but IMO just remarked for netural the other two for line conductors.

Merci,Marc
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Old 12-28-2009, 11:48 PM   #72
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The conduit in the wall looks like EMT not IMC, as do not know of any diecast IMC couplings avail. and 2 things PG&E does not accept is EMT masts & SE cable. (Decided to toss the no SE cable thing for no good reason).

Last edited by Norcal; 12-28-2009 at 11:50 PM.
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Old 12-29-2009, 11:16 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by Norcal View Post
The conduit in the wall looks like EMT not IMC, as do not know of any diecast IMC couplings avail. and 2 things PG&E does not accept is EMT masts & SE cable. (Decided to toss the no SE cable thing for no good reason).
but he does have threaded conduit in the j-box. I can't remember seeing a diecast imc/rigid coupling either though.

this entire installation is a bit on the "unique" side.

Not one I would be overly proud of had it been my install.
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Old 12-29-2009, 07:46 PM   #74
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but he does have threaded conduit in the j-box. I can't remember seeing a diecast imc/rigid coupling either though.

this entire installation is a bit on the "unique" side.

Not one I would be overly proud of had it been my install.
It could very well be a steel EMT fitting, that chase nipple in the back of that screw cover can is a red flag as-is, + it looks to be a only a 6X6X4 on top of that way too small.
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Old 12-29-2009, 08:18 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norcal View Post
It could very well be a steel EMT fitting, that chase nipple in the back of that screw cover can is a red flag as-is, + it looks to be a only a 6X6X4 on top of that way too small.
every steel one I have seen has a rounded end rather than the quick squared off end and this one is very dull like a diecast fitting too.

like this



versus this, which looks like the one being used:



and yes, the box is undersized.

. Maybe the electrician he hires to sign off on it will not sign off until it is correct.

Last edited by nap; 12-29-2009 at 08:21 PM.
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