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Old 12-25-2009, 02:16 AM   #16
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Get all the rain head (sorry don't know real part names) ?
You're close. It's a weatherhead.
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Old 12-25-2009, 09:03 AM   #17
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Jeremy Hillary Boob, PhD, The best way to figure it would be as if you have to replace (most) everything from the meter pan up. The (probably) 2" galvanized mast (most likely one length to the meter pan), roof flashing/boot, cold weather sealant/caulk, weatherhead, ceramic mast anchor (another name for it escapes at the moment), burndy's, and three lengths of properly sized wire, etc... It looks like it's aluminum going down to the meter. The "drop" should be secured near as possible to the existing point of attachment. It's heavier then it looks and could drag you and or your assistant off the roof/ladder. Then the old mast and wires can be removed and replaced. That's the basics. Like frenchelectrician says, time wise for a pro 2-5 hours. IMO this is something left to a certified/licensed electrician. The basics of wiring are easy (just like theory). Doing it properly, efficiently and safely is another story. Best of luck to you, petey
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Old 12-25-2009, 09:23 AM   #18
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who ever does this you will need to take the tension off the splice at the weatherhead and support the incoming supply feeds. I would think a tie back to the rake right behind the mast at that other roof edge. power off first please.
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Old 12-25-2009, 11:19 AM   #19
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While you have this chance, why not bury this service? Perfect timing.
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Old 12-25-2009, 12:20 PM   #20
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While you have this chance, why not bury this service? Perfect timing.
this is where that location thing would be nice to know. In my area, only the stoutest of boys, the dumbest of men, or those simply forced to would tackle the frozen ground this time of year.


Boob; did you straighten that mast back up? If so, I would be very cautious about playing with electricity right now. It looks like the pipe kinked and if that cut into the insulation, it may be not that far from cutting through the insulation.

One thing I did notice is; that pipe looks very small. In my area, you are not allowed to use anything smaller than a 1 1/4 inch pipe for a 100 amp service and 2" for a 200 amp service. I use 2" on either simply because of what happened to you. The 2" is much stronger.

You state there is no inspector but before you spend the money for any material, I would check with whomever you need to to be sure you purchase the proper material for your area.
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Old 12-25-2009, 03:42 PM   #21
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this is where that location thing would be nice to know. In my area, only the stoutest of boys, the dumbest of men, or those simply forced to would tackle the frozen ground this time of year.


Boob; did you straighten that mast back up? If so, I would be very cautious about playing with electricity right now. It looks like the pipe kinked and if that cut into the insulation, it may be not that far from cutting through the insulation.

One thing I did notice is; that pipe looks very small. In my area, you are not allowed to use anything smaller than a 1 1/4 inch pipe for a 100 amp service and 2" for a 200 amp service. I use 2" on either simply because of what happened to you. The 2" is much stronger.

You state there is no inspector but before you spend the money for any material, I would check with whomever you need to to be sure you purchase the proper material for your area.

No, I didn't straighten it---I haven't touched it. However, I am going to have to do something to keep the rain out, since there's no way I can get anything done on it before Monday, and it's supposed to rain over the weekend.

One more question (for now...). Does the tube need to be one continuous piece all the way down to the meter? We have access in the attic and the tube appears to be fine below the bent section. So, could it be cut off in the attic and just replace the top 3' or so? Thanks.
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Old 12-25-2009, 03:52 PM   #22
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who ever does this you will need to take the tension off the splice at the weatherhead and support the incoming supply feeds. I would think a tie back to the rake right behind the mast at that other roof edge. power off first please.
The problem here is that there are lots of big trees (redwoods, douglas fir, and worst of all, diseased oaks) that can, and someday will, hit the wires---via shedding branches or, in the case of the oaks, an entire tree falling. The utility company won't do anything about the trees and none of the problem trees are on my property, so it's not easy, even if I'm willing to pay. The upshot is that I'm not sure that making the connection to the house more solid is such a great strategy, since that might just end up causing more serious damage to the house when something falls on the wires.
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Old 12-25-2009, 03:57 PM   #23
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sorry i just meant for the repair to save having to haul the wire back up from the driveway
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Old 12-25-2009, 05:48 PM   #24
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sorry i just meant for the repair to save having to haul the wire back up from the driveway
I see. As I understand it, we have no choice---the utility company will pull the wires back to the pole, then we'll have to call them out one more time to get the wires returned back to the house and power restored.
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Old 12-26-2009, 07:34 AM   #25
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JHB, PhD, That's probably the best course of action. You don't want to take the chance that one of the wires is crimped in the pipe waiting to find ground. After this gets fixed, take some time to decide what's your best option. Tree/limb removal for the length of the drop, coordination with the other property owners or trench for that same length (not cheap either). The next time something falls on your power lines, you may not be so lucky. It's winter time, you may find arborists (tree guys) willing to give you a better price since they're likely to be slow right now. Good luck, pete
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Old 12-26-2009, 07:52 AM   #26
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HI DOC
I understand your situation you'd rather do it yourself, can't say I blame you however let me ask a question or two?

Did you contact your homeowners insurance?

If not do it.

Take pictures don't touch a thing.

Wait for the adjuster, get a check and call a reputable contractor in the area to complete the job. Sit back and watch, pay the deductible.
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Old 12-26-2009, 08:09 AM   #27
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Don't you need a continuous (unspliced) run from the meter to the weatherhead?

This means you need to have the wires down to the meter disconnected from the service drop in order to string them through a new weatherhead.

The metal plate (it's more than just flashing) partially under the shingles helps sustain the weight of the wires strung to the utility pole so you need to have the whole thing welded back together (or replaced).
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Last edited by AllanJ; 12-26-2009 at 08:15 AM.
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Old 12-26-2009, 08:27 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Jeremy Hillary Boob, PhD View Post

One more question (for now...). Does the tube need to be one continuous piece all the way down to the meter?
Not necessarily
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We have access in the attic and the tube appears to be fine below the bent section. So, could it be cut off in the attic and just replace the top 3' or so? Thanks.
Almost certainly not. It would depend on the POCO rules. Around here, the mast must be continuous from below the topmost support under the eave to the top. (As memory serves) Putting a coupling in the attic would just provide a weak spot.
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Old 12-26-2009, 08:38 AM   #29
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That's tough being out where people won't travel to do the work you need
But I guess it has its good points
I wouldn't mind being a bit further away from everyone
I'm about 20 miles South of Boston

Your pole is supporting the weight of the wires
So splicing a section of pole on will have an effect on how much it can support
It would tend to bend at the joint
I'd go with a 1 piece pipe
Wrong type of weather to be pulling the roof apart to put the new flashing in

Allan ---does the flashing crew into the pole ?



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Old 12-26-2009, 08:59 AM   #30
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I am sure that pole goes right through the roof into the top of the panel with heavy duty clamps securing it to the stud walls.

The flashing is installed before the head is installed.
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