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Old 07-18-2010, 05:20 PM   #1
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current rating for outlets on either side of sink


Is it OK for the outlets on either side of a kitchen sink to have different current ratings (15A and 20A), as long as they are GFCI protected? I cannot put them on the same 20A circuit because I do not have enough access to the circuit that one of the outlets is on.
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Old 07-18-2010, 06:59 PM   #2
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There is very little reason in a residential setting for a 20 amp slotted device. Window shaker air conditioners are one of the few things that might need the T-slots. As long as there is more than 1 space to plug into on a circuit you can use 15 amp slooted receptacles in the US. A standard receptacle counts as two places.

BTW, the 15 amp devices are rated for 20 amp feed-thru.
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Last edited by Jim Port; 07-18-2010 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 07-18-2010, 07:08 PM   #3
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Kitchen requires 2 dedicated 20a circuits for the counter tops
These can only serve the kitchen, possibly an eating area if part of the kitchen

Are you asking about the circuit rating....or the outlets ?



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Old 07-18-2010, 07:44 PM   #4
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At least two 20-ampere branch circuits are required to feed receptacle outlets for small appliance loads, including refrigeration equipment in the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, and dining room. These circuits, whether two or more are used, shall NOT supply anything other than receptacles in these areas. Lighting outlets and built-in appliances such as garbage disposals, hood fans, dishwashers, and trash compactors are NOT permitted on these circuits.
Kitchen counter top receptacles must be supplied by at least two small appliance branch circuits.
Kitchen appliance and convenience receptacles must be on 20 amp breakers, and wired with 12 gauge wire.
http://www.nojolt.com/residential_el...in_guide.shtml


Can't you cut access holes in the cabinet backs to fish the 20 amp one to the 15? One hole in each stud bay.....


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Old 07-19-2010, 07:28 AM   #5
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current rating for outlets on either side of sink Reply to Thread


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
There is very little reason in a residential setting for a 20 amp slotted device. Window shaker air conditioners are one of the few things that might need the T-slots. As long as there is more than 1 space to plug into on a circuit you can use 15 amp slooted receptacles in the US. A standard receptacle counts as two places.

BTW, the 15 amp devices are rated for 20 amp feed-thru.
This is what I was thinking. I've have seen very few devices that have a T-plug.

>>Are you asking about the circuit rating....or the outlets ?

>> Can't you cut access holes in the cabinet backs to fish the 20 amp one to the 15? One hole in each stud bay.....

I was asking about the outlet rating. I put in a new 20A circuit to serve 2 of the three countertop outlets. These have 15A receptacles. The other outlet, which is located next to the sink, is on its original ungrounded 15A circuit. I should re-wire this to at least ground it, and change to a GFCI receptacle. But I now I know that should be on a 20A circuit as well. I can look into access holes in the cabinet to daisy chain the 20A circuit to the ungrounded outlet.

I also have a 15A grounded circuit for my 10A dishwasher and 15A gas range. I should probably upgrade that to 20A. We haven't had a problem yet because we haven't rum both at the same time. I would also like to run a dedicated 15A circuit for my fridge, which draws 4.5A.

A couple more questions that I have been pondering:

1. The label on my gas range says "120V 60Hz 15A". I wasn't expecting a gas range to draw that much. Frigidaire also says to put it on a 40A circuit. What is the reason for this?

2. Does my range hood really have to go on a dedicated circuit if it says it only draws 1.8A? I had read that recommendation on another website.
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Old 07-19-2010, 04:49 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debiasio View Post

1. The label on my gas range says "120V 60Hz 15A". I wasn't expecting a gas range to draw that much. Frigidaire also says to put it on a 40A circuit. What is the reason for this?

2. Does my range hood really have to go on a dedicated circuit if it says it only draws 1.8A? I had read that recommendation on another website.

I'm fairly certain that the "120v 60Hz 15A" label isn't calling for a dedicated 15a circuit. Refer to the installation instructions that came with the range to be sure. In a new kitchen we'll put the range 120v circuit and the hood on the same 15 amp. circuit. We'll sometime even put some of the kitchen lighting on that circuit.
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Old 07-19-2010, 04:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debiasio View Post
2. Does my range hood really have to go on a dedicated circuit if it says it only draws 1.8A? I had read that recommendation on another website.
If it is cord and plug connected, YES it needs a dedicated circuit.

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