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Old 05-01-2010, 07:04 AM   #1
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Cover Ground Cable


I am builing a retaining wall. One of the house ground pins are behind this wall. Is it ok to bury this?
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Old 05-01-2010, 07:58 AM   #2
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If by ground pin, you mean ground rod, then the answer is yes.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:11 PM   #3
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The answer is: It depends on your municipality!

I was told SPECIFICALLY that my ground connection must be 6" above the ground, I could not bury it, not even within a covered box.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:17 PM   #4
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Hmmmm...here they expect them buried too



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Old 05-06-2010, 03:36 PM   #5
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Believe me, I clarified the heck out of that with my building department. I was putting in new service and the old service was only grounded to the water pipe. There is an apron of concrete around most of the house near where the panels are, so to ensure I got my grounds rods into wet earth I would have had to run them right into the middle of a play area.

Yep, my building department wanted me to stick a 6" bare metal rod with a wire and acorn nut right out in the lawn where people could trip on it or even impale themselves... two of them, in fact.

I ended up running the ground wire to another side of the house with dirt instead of concrete, and after the inspection I made little protective caps out of ABS pipe and end caps.
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Old 05-06-2010, 09:59 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxPaulCPxx View Post
Yep, my building department wanted me to stick a 6" bare metal rod with a wire and acorn nut right out in the lawn where people could trip on it or even impale themselves... two of them, in fact.

I ended up running the ground wire to another side of the house with dirt instead of concrete, and after the inspection I made little protective caps out of ABS pipe and end caps.
I hope you actually meant 8 foot, not 6 inches. Also the top of the rod should be buried, not sticking up above grade. The code requires 8' in contact with the earth. With 6" sticking up you would only have 7' 6" in contact with the earth.
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Old 05-06-2010, 11:17 PM   #7
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I meant 6" be visible above grade.

Hey, you don't like it, you go argue with my local building inspector... but I think the second sentence in your signature applies here.
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Old 05-07-2010, 05:38 AM   #8
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Paul? After the inspector passes this non compliant installation (lol) why dont you just go ahead and beat the rods down the last six inches? I doubt he's gonna come back and check
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Old 05-07-2010, 07:29 AM   #9
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Andy, I feel for you but your inspector is incorrect, unless you had 10 foot rods with the stub sticking up. I know things change sometimes but here the top of the rod is left exposed until inspected and then the hole is filled in. Did the inspector give a reason that the rod must stick up?
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Old 05-07-2010, 01:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy-n-ATL View Post
Paul? After the inspector passes this non compliant installation (lol) why dont you just go ahead and beat the rods down the last six inches? I doubt he's gonna come back and check
Because DIYers always get the "special sauce" inspections. We have to be Extra carefull of our compliance... it's not like I'm going to be leaving and doing a job under a different inspector - I'm stuck with these guys coming back to my house over and over again. DIYers are like a 6th finger to inspectors - they remember us.

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Andy, I feel for you but your inspector is incorrect, unless you had 10 foot rods with the stub sticking up. I know things change sometimes but here the top of the rod is left exposed until inspected and then the hole is filled in. Did the inspector give a reason that the rod must stick up?
No reason other that you had to be able to see the rod and connection. I specifically asked about pounding it down after inspection and that WAS NOT OK in their book. I couldn't even put it in a ground service box (like you would have for an underground water meter) and have the stub 6"up from that grade - it had to stick up from the surface of the lawn.
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Old 05-07-2010, 02:53 PM   #11
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IMO the stub sticking out of the ground is more likely to create issues and has more potential for damage by being installed per the inspectors wishes. The chance of the connection on the acorn coming loose underground is almost nil, especially vs being exposed.

Can't tell you what to do, but I know what I would do.
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Old 05-07-2010, 03:09 PM   #12
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This is what the NEC says at Article 250.53


(G) Rod and Pipe Electrodes.
The electrode shall be installed
such that at least 2.44 m (8
ft) of length is in contact
with the soil. It shall be driven to a depth of not less than
2.44 m (8
ft) except that, where rock bottom is encountered,
the electrode shall be. driven at an oblique angle not
to exceed 45 degrees from the vertical or, where rock bottom
is encountered at an angle up to 45 degrees, the electrode
shall be permitted to be buried in a trench that is at
least 750 mm(30 in.) deep. The upper end of the electrode
shall be flush with or below ground level unless the aboveground
end and the grounding electrode conductor attachment
are protected against physical damage as specified in

250.10.

250.10
Protection of Ground Clamps and Fittings.

Ground clamps or other fittings shall be approved for general
use without protection or shall be protected from
physical damage as indicated in
(1) or (2) as follows:


(1)
In installations where they are not likely to be damaged

(2) Where enclosed in metal, wood, or equivalent protective

covering
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Old 05-07-2010, 03:20 PM   #13
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In addition this is how 256.68 (A) reads!

Accessibility.

All mechanical elements used to terminate a grounding electrode conductor or bonding jumper to a grounding electrode shall be accessible.

Exception 1:

An encased or buried connection to a concrete-encased, driven, or buried grounding electrode shall not be required to be accessible.
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Old 05-07-2010, 03:40 PM   #14
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Thank you, codeone, I'll be sure and print that out and give that to them in person, so that they will know for sure who is telling them they are doing their jobs wrong.
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Old 05-07-2010, 03:44 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxPaulCPxx View Post
Thank you, codeone, I'll be sure and print that out and give that to them in person, so that they will know for sure who is telling them they are doing their jobs wrong.
Just be careful about local ordnances. They can bite you.
If they say it is, respectfully ask for it in writing as a legal document with statute number.
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