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Old 07-07-2019, 07:56 AM   #16
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


or, put a timer on the heater so that it can only operate in the early morning hours, before waking up, when the charger is already 'finished'.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:31 AM   #17
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yes, as I'm not really as sure what the 'issue' is with sharing the power, as the owner will either be 'without' HEAT, or 'without' CHARGING, while sleeping overnight... neither can happen at the same time, and if 'charging' is MORE important, then simply turn the heater off for the night. Your switch is doing the same thing, only you are adding more work to 'add it' to the equation.
Yes very good point. But isn't it a code violation by knowingly adding a load to a circuit that you know will trip the breaker if both are on at the same time? I.e. if owner forgets to turn off heat then breaker will trip if he charges his car overnight.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:39 AM   #18
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


https://www.amazon.com/Hubbell-HBL13.../dp/B00N7GJNK2
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:46 AM   #19
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Yes that is exactly what I am proposing except it's a 20 amp switch
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:58 AM   #20
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or, put a timer on the heater so that it can only operate in the early morning hours, before waking up, when the charger is already 'finished'.
Timer is also a very good idea but I would use it to control both circuits i.e. like a dpdt timer when off it would switch the charging circuit on and when on it would switch the heater circuit on.
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Old 07-07-2019, 10:03 AM   #21
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


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Yes that is exactly what I am proposing except it's a 20 amp switch
Can't find any info on what it made for or when you shouldn't use it.
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Old 07-07-2019, 10:06 AM   #22
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


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Yes that is exactly what I am proposing except it's a 20 amp switch
Just because it is a 30 amp switch, doesn't mean you have to run 30 amps through it.

20 amps will run will run through it nicely.
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Old 07-07-2019, 10:32 AM   #23
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


I see no mention of the purpose for this baseboard heater being installed in a condo garage. Is it to just keep the garage space temp bearable during extremely low ambient temps outside?

OR, is it in place to maintain an above freezing temp for possible water lines running concealed somewhere above the garage ceiling/etc. ? I dunnno….

But if its the later, forgetting to turn the heater switch back to "on" and then leaving town for many days during a cold spell, could cause some serious issues. Just food for thought.
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Old 07-07-2019, 11:10 AM   #24
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I see no mention of the purpose for this baseboard heater being installed in a condo garage. Is it to just keep the garage space temp bearable during extremely low ambient temps outside?

OR, is it in place to maintain an above freezing temp for possible water lines running concealed somewhere above the garage ceiling/etc. ? I dunnno….

But if its the later, forgetting to turn the heater switch back to "on" and then leaving town for many days during a cold spell, could cause some serious issues. Just food for thought.
There is no water in the garage but I cannot rule out water pipes in the ceiling but normally the garage space is insulated from the living areas. In any case there are 2 other baseboards in the open area that will compensate somewhat for the heater being off. But a timer would be a good idea to handle this scenario.
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Old 07-07-2019, 11:41 AM   #25
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This timer would work in this application
https://www.amazon.com/Intermatic-GM...s%2C145&sr=8-1
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Old 07-07-2019, 02:45 PM   #26
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


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But isn't it a code violation by knowingly adding a load to a circuit that you know will trip the breaker if both are on at the same time? I.e. if owner forgets to turn off heat then breaker will trip if he charges his car overnight.
Yes. You also have another consideration. Which EXACT version of the NEC is the location using? The latest codes do not allow a vehicle charger to share a branch circuit with anything at all. You would be required to install the switch regardless of load levels or timers.
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Old 07-07-2019, 03:00 PM   #27
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


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Electrically, I don't know why not..... code wise I have nfi....
It only needs to switch both lines if the switch has a labeled OFF position. When such a switch is off it needs to disconnect all ungrounded conductors to the load. The typical single pole 3-way does not have marked positions so it would actually be okay for this application.

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I kinda wondered about that in a baseboard heat installation. As they make both single and double throw thermostats, I kinda assumed that either were NEC code compliant...except if there were county modifications to the NEC. Either way, we ran double throw thermostats.
Same thing but an additional reason. A single pole thermostat is fine for simply controlling the heaters. But heaters also require a disconnect, which in turn requires the labeled OFF position and thus a double pole switch for 240V circuits. So if the thermostat was also being used as a disconnect the two pole version was needed.
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Old 07-07-2019, 03:17 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTN REMODEL LLC View Post
Electrically, I don't know why not..... code wise I have nfi....
It only needs to switch both lines if the switch has a labeled OFF position. When such a switch is off it needs to disconnect all ungrounded conductors to the load. The typical single pole 3-way does not have marked positions so it would actually be okay for this application.

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I kinda wondered about that in a baseboard heat installation. As they make both single and double throw thermostats, I kinda assumed that either were NEC code compliant...except if there were county modifications to the NEC. Either way, we ran double throw thermostats.
Same thing but an additional reason. A single pole thermostat is fine for simply controlling the heaters. But heaters also require a disconnect, which in turn requires the labeled OFF position and thus a double pole switch for 240V circuits. So if the thermostat was also being used as a disconnect the two pole version was needed.
Is a breaker a proper disconnect for a baseboard heater? In my home all my baseboard heaters are controlled by single pole thermostats and there is no disconnect other than the respective breakers.
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Old 07-07-2019, 03:48 PM   #29
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Re: Converting 240v wire used for garage baseboard heater for electric car charger


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Originally Posted by lmcancu View Post
Is a breaker a proper disconnect for a baseboard heater? In my home all my baseboard heaters are controlled by single pole thermostats and there is no disconnect other than the respective breakers.

240v thermostats usually break the 2nd pole when dialed completely down to "off." Only 1 pole opens and closes automatically depending on temperature setting.



Quote:
Hi, my nephew lives in a small 3 unit condominium building. He shares an open garage space with his 2 neighbours. However the garage space is equally divided in 3 areas where each have their own 240v baseboard heater, 120v plugs and lights.

Quote:
In any case there are 2 other baseboards in the open area that will compensate somewhat for the heater being off.

-I'm not convinced this heater you want to tap into is powered by your nephew's meter. An open garage space couldn't be fairly heated if one or two residents shut their heaters off.



-Since this is a condominium unit - It's likely neither you nor the nephew is permitted to tamper with any of the building wiring.
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Old 07-07-2019, 04:11 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmcancu View Post
Is a breaker a proper disconnect for a baseboard heater? In my home all my baseboard heaters are controlled by single pole thermostats and there is no disconnect other than the respective breakers.

240v thermostats usually break the 2nd pole when dialed completely down to "off." Only 1 pole opens and closes automatically depending on temperature setting.



Quote:
Hi, my nephew lives in a small 3 unit condominium building. He shares an open garage space with his 2 neighbours. However the garage space is equally divided in 3 areas where each have their own 240v baseboard heater, 120v plugs and lights.

Quote:
In any case there are 2 other baseboards in the open area that will compensate somewhat for the heater being off.

-I'm not convinced this heater you want to tap into is powered by your nephew's meter. An open garage space couldn't be fairly heated if one or two residents shut their heaters off.



-Since this is a condominium unit - It's likely neither you nor the nephew is permitted to tamper with any of the building wiring.
Yes it is powered through his panel. I verified it. Yes I agree since it's a shared space he will hire a licensed electrician for any work done here. I am assessing the cost of this application which would be dpdt timer (70 usd) + 240v receptacle (6-20) $10, plus electricians fee ( 1 hour plus cables, etc?) vs the electrican running a dedicated 240v circuit 30/40 amp from his panel to the garage, etc. The living space is above the garage.
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