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Old 01-22-2010, 05:08 PM   #1
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Connecting wall-mounted heater


I'm replacing a can-mounted, inset 240V bathroom heater with a wall-mounted version. I'm going to have to drywall over the existing hole in the wall, but was wondering what is the proper way to have the conduit/wires come through the drywall to enter the back of the new unit? Do I just mount an outlet box where the wires will come out, or is there another receptacle that is required?

Thanks.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:13 PM   #2
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The wall mount heater should have a metal box that surrounds the components correct?

In this metal box there should be a few knockout plugs for your electrical wires and thermostat wires (if controlled by a separate thermostat) to enter through.

The knockout plugs look just like the metal and are usually 1/2" in diameter, they have been scored all the way around so one can knock them out with a screwdriver. You must protect the wires from the metal as they enter the box, they have either plastic or metal connectors that fits in the metal knockout whole that your wires will pass through and be secured.

Don't know if this makes sense to you or not, but let us know if what you see.

Also, if the heater is going to be controlled by a separate thermostat mounted on the wall somewhere else, be sure to run the thermostat wires through a separate knockout and don't run it parallel with your 110v/220v wires.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:26 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by <*(((>< View Post
The wall mount heater should have a metal box that surrounds the components correct?

In this metal box there should be a few knockout plugs for your electrical wires and thermostat wires (if controlled by a separate thermostat) to enter through.

The knockout plugs look just like the metal and are usually 1/2" in diameter, they have been scored all the way around so one can knock them out with a screwdriver. You must protect the wires from the metal as they enter the box, they have either plastic or metal connectors that fits in the metal knockout whole that your wires will pass through and be secured.

Don't know if this makes sense to you or not, but let us know if what you see.

Also, if the heater is going to be controlled by a separate thermostat mounted on the wall somewhere else, be sure to run the thermostat wires through a separate knockout and don't run it parallel with your 110v/220v wires.
Actually, the current heater is recessed into the wall, and the conduit comes down and connects directly to the side of the heater. There is no box with knockouts. The new heater will sit on-top of the wall and there is a hole in the back of the unit to accept the wires from the wall. I was just wondering once the old unit is out and I just have a conduit, how do I properly have it come out of the new drywall and into the back of the new heater.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:29 PM   #4
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You may have to install a transition to flex, and then terminate the flex into the back of the new unit. Hopefully, your circuit conductors will be long enough to handle the transition.
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:11 PM   #5
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You may have to install a transition to flex, and then terminate the flex into the back of the new unit. Hopefully, your circuit conductors will be long enough to handle the transition.
So it's OK to just have the flex poke through a hole in the wall into the heater? No need for a box to feed the wires out of?
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Old 01-22-2010, 09:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebigsee View Post
Actually, the current heater is recessed into the wall, and the conduit comes down and connects directly to the side of the heater. There is no box with knockouts. The new heater will sit on-top of the wall and there is a hole in the back of the unit to accept the wires from the wall. I was just wondering once the old unit is out and I just have a conduit, how do I properly have it come out of the new drywall and into the back of the new heater.
So let me get this straight, the new heater will attach to the surface of the sheetrock with screws or such?

If this is the case then the only thing you need to do is stub the wires into the back of the heater, and if the hole in the back of the heater has no way of securing the wire and protecting the insulation from damage use a "twin screw romex connector" (search google for a picture) that fits the hole in the back of the heater. The connectors come in various sizes.

If I'm totally out in left field maybe a picture of the back of the heater would help us, help you.
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Old 01-22-2010, 10:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
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So let me get this straight, the new heater will attach to the surface of the sheetrock with screws or such?

If this is the case then the only thing you need to do is stub the wires into the back of the heater, and if the hole in the back of the heater has no way of securing the wire and protecting the insulation from damage use a "twin screw romex connector" (search google for a picture) that fits the hole in the back of the heater. The connectors come in various sizes.

If I'm totally out in left field maybe a picture of the back of the heater would help us, help you.
Here's a link to it:

http://www.irawoods.com/Stiebel-Eltr...ric-Fan-Heater

Yes, it just sits on top of the sheetrock. There's a flex conduit (the aluminum type, not Romex) in the wall right now. I could connect it directly through a 1/2" hole in the sheetrock, but I thought I should check to see if the proper way is to connect the flex to some sort of box that's installed in the wall.

Thanks to everyone for their helpfulness!
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