Commercial Convection Oven - Electrical - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 05-07-2010, 11:11 AM   #16
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
Any oven on a normal "Bake" setting cycles on and off to maintain the temperature. This is not a "continuous" load.
The Romex 6 Gauge wire is rated at 55amps... would it be foolish to upgrade the the 6 Gauge THHN wire rated at 75amps and still use the 60A breaker? Is the 75feet run a important consideration? The Romex 6 gauge is appealing so I don't have to run conduit, but I want to do it right, not cheap.
rlineberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-07-2010, 11:33 AM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


Voltage drop at 75' = 3.8v, 1.6% which is fine



Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-07-2010, 12:55 PM   #18
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Voltage drop at 75' = 3.8v, 1.6% which is fine
But am I pushing the limit with the 55amp rating when I need 53amps?
rlineberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-07-2010, 01:04 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


If the rating of the stove was 55a you could still use #6 wire rated at 55a
You might hit 53a for a brief time period if you had every burner on high & the oven at the same time
Load would drop off as burners/oven reached temp
Unlikely you would ever run at even close to 53a for any extended time period



Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2010, 01:06 PM   #20
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
If the rating of the stove was 55a you could still use #6 wire rated at 55a
You might hit 53a for a brief time period if you had every burner on high & the oven at the same time
Load would drop off as burners/oven reached temp
Unlikely you would ever run at even close to 53a for any extended time period
That sounds good to me. My crawlspace only has about 18" clear so being under there running wire in conduit is something I would love to get out of. I think I am going to go with using 6/3 romex wire on a 60 amp breaker. I don't need the extra (red) wire, but i would rather have it in case I ever to put another unit that would require it.
rlineberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2010, 03:10 PM   #21
Electrician
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 1,352
Rewards Points: 910
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by sparks1up View Post
Darren makes a good point! I typically size my wiring to 125% of the load for continuous loads which works out about the same (53 x 1.25 = 66.25-amps) = #4 wire)
It should work out to the exact same, that is the same as dividing by .8. I just rounded down when I put the number in.

Kbsparky- We are always taught to make anything in a commercial setting a continous load. I do agree that oven probably won't be pulling 53A but have always been taught to bump a commercial stove. In the OP case I would not consider it a contoinous load, so wire with whatever the NEC says is good.
darren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2010, 03:36 PM   #22
Inspector/Instructor
 
codeone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: NC
Posts: 369
Rewards Points: 250
Default


Typically a commercial range or oven is not allowed in a residence, because it does not have the same safety features. Is your oven rated for a residence? I know they make a commercial grade that is. Your insurance may not pay if you get one tha is not, and you could be putting your family in unnecessary dangers.
Just a thought to consider.
codeone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2010, 09:39 PM   #23
Electrical Contractor
 
kbsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Delmarva
Posts: 3,368
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by rlineberg View Post
... I am going to go with using 6/3 romex wire on a 60 amp breaker. I don't need the extra (red) wire ....
Ummm ... the "extra" wire in this instance would be the white one. You need the red one when using such a cable for a 240 Volt circuit.
__________________
-KB

Life is uncertain -- eat dessert first!!
kbsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 03:05 PM   #24
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Another thought: I am definitely going with the 6 gauge THHN wire because if I do have to up the amperage because the 60amp breaker can't handle it I want to have the option.

So 2- 6 Gauge THHN wires and 1-8 Gauge THHN ground wire. Can I run the THHN wire in SCH. 40 conduit with no issues?
rlineberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 03:12 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW of D.C.
Posts: 5,990
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


I'd think an oven with a 'right-sized' heating element would be on all the time, 100% duty cycle, when the highest temp. is selected. Like a 'right-sized' furnace on the coldest day.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 05-10-2010 at 03:32 PM.
Yoyizit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 08:49 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 37
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Clearance to adjacent kitchen stuff


Have you considered clearance to cabinets or other appliances in the kitchen. Commercial appliances are not insulated the same way as residential appliances so the outside gets hot. They are designed to be placed against other commercial appliances that are not combustible. I believe that you will have both warranty and insurance problems with this appliance in you home.
The manufacturer won't honor the warranty in a residential install and you home insurance at least needs to know that you have this thing in your house. If you have a fire and that's when they find out you had a commercial oven...good luck.

Your heat management problems will be serious if you are baking for several hours in a day. Let's say it would take 60 min to preheat to 475 if you want crusty bread and then you're baking for another few hours your kitchen and house will be unbearable.

All this said.... I want one too
trosenda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 07:30 AM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW of D.C.
Posts: 5,990
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by trosenda View Post
your kitchen and house will be unbearable.
12 kw = 40,000 BTU/hr, about 1/4th the size of my gas furnace.
Yoyizit is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SCARY oven fire! Why did it burn? Beth777 Appliances 73 09-03-2016 02:19 PM
Oven Blew Up at Connector with Element cynthiap Appliances 6 10-31-2015 09:48 AM
installing ge profile convection oven momof2labs Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 1 02-27-2010 01:43 PM
Gas oven problems gregsmy Appliances 1 12-03-2009 05:55 AM
Counter top trim to fit with slide in oven bhagey Appliances 1 07-17-2009 08:32 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts