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Old 05-07-2010, 08:38 AM   #1
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Commercial Convection Oven


I have purchased a commercial grade convection oven for my home because I run a baking business from my kitchen. Here is the plate information:

230 Volts
53 Amps
Single Phase or 3-Phase wiring (planning on single phase of course)

All of my other major appliances are gas, but even still I don't have enough wattage left in my 100AMP panel box so I am upgrading it to a 200AMP service.

My question: I am planning on using a 60AMP breaker to carry this thing, and although I know 6 Gauge wire is used for this amperage, should I be using 6/2? or should I be using 6 Gauge THHN wire? The run is less than 75 feet.
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Old 05-07-2010, 08:58 AM   #2
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#6 gauge romex is only good for 55-amps so you cannot connect to a 60-amp breaker. Also assuming you did use romex it would have to be a 6-3 with ground (4 wires).
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:04 AM   #3
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Is the 53A for single phase or when it is wired to 3 phase.

Also you say this is for a bakeing business you have in your house, how long will this stove be running. Does it go all day or a couple hrs a day. The reason I ask if it is used all day you will have to consider it a contoinus load which means you will have to derate it by 80%. I am assumeing the NEC is the same when it comes to continous loads to what the CEC says.

This would take you to 53/.8=66A. So now your looking at #4(based on CEC may be different in the NEC) and a 70A breaker.
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:04 AM   #4
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I have not run the wire yet, but is sounds like I will want to use the 6 Gauge THHN. Is this correct?
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:05 AM   #5
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Actually you are allowed to upgrade to the next highest breaker
So long as the anticipated load does not exceed the wire rating

THHN has a higher rating -65a & I would use that
A 4 wire feed is required

Darren brings up a good point



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Old 05-07-2010, 10:08 AM   #6
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4-wire feed is not required on an appliance with a 240 volt only rating. Only if it is rated 120/240 volts would a neutral conductor be needed. It appears this is not the case in this instance.

As for the wire size and circuit breaker, the #6 is rated for 55 Amps. Since the nameplate requires 53 Amps, that is within tolerance. You are allowed to use the next-size standard breaker, which is 60 Amp.

Such an appliance would have to be direct-wired in most cases.
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:12 AM   #7
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Ah, Thanks - I'm used to stove requiring 120/240 w/controls



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Old 05-07-2010, 10:13 AM   #8
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Darren makes a good point! I typically size my wiring to 125% of the load for continuous loads which works out about the same (53 x 1.25 = 66.25-amps) = #4 wire)
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:19 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darren View Post
Is the 53A for single phase or when it is wired to 3 phase.

Also you say this is for a bakeing business you have in your house, how long will this stove be running. Does it go all day or a couple hrs a day. The reason I ask if it is used all day you will have to consider it a contoinus load which means you will have to derate it by 80%. I am assumeing the NEC is the same when it comes to continous loads to what the CEC says.

This would take you to 53/.8=66A. So now your looking at #4(based on CEC may be different in the NEC) and a 70A breaker.
Good questions...

The 53A is when it is wired for single phase. (I believe the 3-phase is like 32-ish, but not 100% sure)

The max use of this oven is 2-3 days per week, 4 hours at a time.

Is the #4 copper or aluminum? And should it be THHN?
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:23 AM   #10
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Interesting thought
Cooking a big turkey can take longer then 3 hours
So do you always upsize the wire just for that one day ?



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Old 05-07-2010, 10:25 AM   #11
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Ovens are not continuous loads. You would burn up anything cooking in there if the elements were on full blast for more than 3 hours....
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:27 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
Ovens are not continuous loads. You would burn up anything cooking in there if the elements were on full blast for more than 3 hours....
This is true, but I don't keep the same bread in the oven for the 3 hours. It is a series of bread pans for about 45 minutes each. So the oven does not get turned off in between.
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Old 05-07-2010, 10:28 AM   #13
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That's true....so #4 wire is not needed

If you will be cooking for 4 hours I hope you have a good exhaust fan to get the heat out of the house in the summer



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Old 05-07-2010, 10:35 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
4-wire feed is not required on an appliance with a 240 volt only rating. Only if it is rated 120/240 volts would a neutral conductor be needed. It appears this is not the case in this instance.

As for the wire size and circuit breaker, the #6 is rated for 55 Amps. Since the nameplate requires 53 Amps, that is within tolerance. You are allowed to use the next-size standard breaker, which is 60 Amp.

Such an appliance would have to be direct-wired in most cases.
I am pretty sure I don't have the connections for a 4 wire feed. It is indeed a 240 volt rating only. I only have 2 lugs in the oven itself and of course a ground.

I see what you are saying about about the 53A nameplate rating... but this continuous load thing has me thinking of of kicking it up a notch just to be safe. I never bake anything at the full 500 degrees though, so I don't think I would ever touch that 53A. What are your thoughts?

Last edited by rlineberg; 05-07-2010 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 05-07-2010, 11:09 AM   #15
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Any oven on a normal "Bake" setting cycles on and off to maintain the temperature. This is not a "continuous" load.
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