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Old 12-14-2010, 06:32 PM   #1
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Bathroom wiring


I'm remodeling my bathroom, and need to do all new wiring, as it was way overloaded before. It's pretty small, but I plan on having two 6" recessed above the tub, two recessed for the main area, with one also being a fan, a wall mount vanity light above the sink, and one GFI plug. My thoughts are to have the GFI on it's own circuit using 12/2. The fan and lights on their own using 14/2. My big question is routing. It's a ranch home with an unfinished basement, so running the GFI down the wall and along the basement ceiling seems easiest. I also can wire the two bathtub lights in the attic and run down the wall to their switch, as well as wiring the fan/light and other overhead light together, down the wall to their switch. I planned on bringing power from underneath up to these switches. Now with the vanity light being on the opposite wall, and it's switch as well, would it be ok to run the wire down and into the basement, and send to a junction box with the other two switches, and then to the box? OR..should the vanity light be run up over the cieling, and down to tap power from the other two switches, then one feed wire going down into the basement all the way to the main panel, eliminating a junction box. I have a crude drawing here so folks get the overall locations. The room is down to studs right now, so any way should be easy. Thanks for any help.

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Old 12-14-2010, 06:47 PM   #2
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I like to feed my switches with a neutral wire in the box.
Either way will work, but I would emlinate the junction box.
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Old 12-15-2010, 07:45 AM   #3
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You'll have to excuse my ignorance here. My wiring ability is really limited to the standard black to black, white to white, so I'm unsure of what you mean by wiring with a neutral wire. Any further explanation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 12-15-2010, 07:55 AM   #4
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So, to turn on the lights for the Bathroom, you have to completely enter the space. The light switches should be by the door. As for the GCFI protected outlets, there should be one to the right hand side of the sink. As for your knowledge of electricity connecting Black to Black, White to White, you should stop there, because not always is White Neutral (means not attached to the breaker).



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Old 12-15-2010, 08:32 AM   #5
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Due to how the room is, there isn't a place for the switches by the door, so they are kinda stuck where they are, which is better than where they used to be. The drawing isn't to scale, so it's not as much distance as you'd think. I realize my electrical limitations, and that it's not always "black and white", hence why I ask questions and want to learn more and not just give up.
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Old 12-15-2010, 11:38 AM   #6
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When they said the neutral at the switch they were talking about bringing the power into and leaving the switch box instead of a switch loop. The whites would be spliced and tucked into the switchbox but not connected to the switch.
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Old 12-15-2010, 01:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
So, to turn on the lights for the Bathroom, you have to completely enter the space. The light switches should be by the door. As for the GCFI protected outlets, there should be one to the right hand side of the sink. As for your knowledge of electricity connecting Black to Black, White to White, you should stop there, because not always is White Neutral (means not attached to the breaker).
A "GFCI to the right"would be based upon personal preference or some code article I am not aware of?
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Old 12-15-2010, 03:13 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brric
A "GFCI to the right"would be based upon personal preference or some code article I am not aware of?
Our city requires a gcfi protected to the right of a bathroom vanity, an one to the left within 48" of each other. Most if not all are going that way, so that you do not have to drape cords for blow dryers and cruiling irons across the sink.



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Old 12-15-2010, 04:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Our city requires a gcfi protected to the right of a bathroom vanity, an one to the left within 48" of each other. Most if not all are going that way, so that you do not have to drape cords for blow dryers and cruiling irons across the sink.
What is a local ordinance is not necessarily what is required under the NEC. " Most if not all is not true at all."
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Old 12-15-2010, 05:29 PM   #10
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What is a local ordinance is not necessarily what is required under the NEC. " Most if not all is not true at all."
Nothing was quoted from the NEC, regarding this being a local requirement, and that you are starting to see it become more common as stated above. Safety is the first reason, because draping electrical cords through a sink with water, or the possibility of water being ran, cause electrical shocks.



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Old 12-15-2010, 06:56 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
As for your knowledge of electricity connecting Black to Black, White to White, you should stop there, because not always is White Neutral (means not attached to the breaker).
I completely agree!
If that is all of your knowledge of electrical work STOP right there and get some good books on home wiring. A complete bathroom remodel is not your basic black-to-black, white-to-white job.
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Old 12-15-2010, 06:58 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Our city requires a gcfi protected to the right of a bathroom vanity, an one to the left within 48" of each other. Most if not all are going that way, so that you do not have to drape cords for blow dryers and cruiling irons across the sink.
I would hardly say "most are going this way".
In all my years, and on all the forums I frequent, this is the first I have EVER heard of this.
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Old 12-15-2010, 07:58 PM   #13
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Since posting this, I've done nothing but look things up and look at diagrams to further my knowledge. Things do make more sense to me now, but I guess I'm unsure of just how my specific application, being just doing some lights and switches, is more than black and white. I'm not seeing how I'd need a 3 wire or anything. am I missing something?
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