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Old 08-14-2015, 01:52 AM   #16
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Pretty much. black to black, white to white. You more than likely will not have a ground on the actual light fixture though.

You also do not need to wirenut ground wires, those are fine just to twist together & leave bare. I personally like to wrap electrical tape around my wirenuts after putting them on for added security but that is not necessary per code.

Also, the box is not to be uncovered. You are to put a cover on it. They make cover plates for whatever you intend to use as a junction box.

It is basically going to look like this


Except the wires that are sticking out in the photo will be running all the way over to your ceiling light box.

Just remember. Black to brass
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Old 08-14-2015, 01:55 AM   #17
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Not hard but I still don't know how to do the splice. I do know I need uncovered boxes, wire nuts and the electricity off. ...

Horrible drawings I know but is the box with the 3 wires correct? Join 3 wires in 3 pairs? Matching like wires? I didn't join the wires in the picture but that's what I mean.
It depends on what the wires are. Modern houses are wired with 3-4 wires. White is supposed to be used for neutral, a bare wire is supposed to be used for ground, and red and black are supposed to be used for different hot legs. Never assume they are done the right way, but that's how they're supposed to be.

If you have the right wires (a modern wire with white neutral, bare ground, and at least one of red or black hot), you connect all three wires of the same color together using the correct size wire nut. A wire nut is just a little plastic cap with a metal interior that you screw over the wires to hold them together.

(The wires are most likely 12 gauge or 14 gauge. You want to use more of whichever gauge is there when you run the new wire--for example, a 12-2 with ground for the thicker wire or 14-2 with ground for the thinner wire) If the junction box is metal you also "pigtail" a fourth wire from the metal box's ground screw to the ground wire.

Twist together wires with pliers to assist twisting but without compressing the wire, then tighten the nut over the wires by hand. If you need a little more length, "pigtail" a short wire to the old wire.

It may be easier to connect the wires together at an existing light or junction box and run the cable a little farther than to install an additional junction box for the splice.

Disclaimer: not an electrician, verify anything I say but it should give you a good jumping off-point.
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Old 08-14-2015, 09:10 AM   #18
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Bare light bulbs are not allowed in closets . There are clearance requirements from the storage areas like the shelves for different fixture types. You may not even have enough room to install a fixture.

The Comment from Hick regarding ground wires not needing a connector like a wire nut is incorrect. They can't be just twisted together.
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Last edited by Jim Port; 08-14-2015 at 09:15 AM.
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Old 08-14-2015, 09:28 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hick View Post
Pretty much. black to black, white to white. You more than likely will not have a ground on the actual light fixture though.

You also do not need to wirenut ground wires, those are fine just to twist together & leave bare. I personally like to wrap electrical tape around my wirenuts after putting them on for added security but that is not necessary per code.

Also, the box is not to be uncovered. You are to put a cover on it. They make cover plates for whatever you intend to use as a junction box.

It is basically going to look like this


Except the wires that are sticking out in the photo will be running all the way over to your ceiling light box.

Just remember. Black to brass

Sorry, I'm using the wrong terms but by uncovered I meant not hidden under insulation.

I do understand connecting two wires together like your picture. I am just wondering if you can do 3 together without an issue? That line(semi straight line) from the first picture is the existing wire. It does not have enough slack to drag it to the new light. So, I am basically wanting to make a T with the line by adding another cable that goes to the light itself. I just don't know if it's safe to do so or anywhere near standard code.

I am also not using a bare bulb, I added a switch to one of the basic $20 dome lights(enclosed).

I am going to use the same type of wire, wire nuts, and electrical tape on all wires just to be safe.
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Old 08-14-2015, 09:47 AM   #20
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That fixture will still require at least a 12" clearance from the storage areas.

Cutting a cable and installing a junction box will not leave enough conductors to make a splice. You need at least 6" of free conductor from each cable. The way to fix this is to add two boxes with a short cable between.
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Old 08-14-2015, 02:01 PM   #21
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Adding Pull String Light - No Light Existed Before


I understand but that's not what my problem is currently(unless I'm misunderstanding). I understand that a completely taught wire would need what you are talking about but that's not my problem. The light is feet away vs the existing small amount of slack the cable currently has(which should be enough for the splice).


My question is can I have 3 sets of 3 or is there a different proper way to do so.

Last edited by 01grander; 08-14-2015 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:18 PM   #22
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I don't know anyone who has taught a wire, but someone pulled the wire taut.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:20 PM   #23
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Yes, I know. Haha. My work is down 6 people today and I've worked 13 hour days the past 4 days......I'm exhausted and barely still moving.
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Old 08-14-2015, 07:11 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom738 View Post

(The wires are most likely 12 gauge or 14 gauge. You want to use more of whichever gauge is there when you run the new wire--for example, a 12-2 with ground for the thicker wire or 14-2 with ground for the thinner wire) If the junction box is metal you also "pigtail" a fourth wire from the metal box's ground screw to the ground wire.

Twist together wires with pliers to assist twisting but without compressing the wire, then tighten the nut over the wires by hand. If you need a little more length, "pigtail" a short wire to the old wire.

It may be easier to connect the wires together at an existing light or junction box and run the cable a little farther than to install an additional junction box for the splice.

Disclaimer: not an electrician, verify anything I say but it should give you a good jumping off-point.
would like to point out, that if you put 14G wire onto a circuit, you must use a 15A or lower breaker. Keeping it at 12G you can keep 20A circuit. That is per code atleast, weather you do it or not is up to you. I have plenty of 14G wire on 20A circuits all through my house, doesnt bother me any.

Also did not think about using an existing celing box as a junction duh. Yeah, if you got an existing box use it. Just make sure it is a constant hot & not wired to a switch, otherwise you are going to have a switch turning both lights on & off together.
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Old 08-14-2015, 07:20 PM   #25
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Quote:
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My question is can I have 3 sets of 3 or is there a different proper way to do so.

The size of your box determines the number of wires allowed in it. Your box should have some markings on it listing the cubic inches. Find the number and post it or look it up to determine if three wires are allowed.
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Old 08-14-2015, 08:08 PM   #26
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The size of your box determines the number of wires allowed in it. Your box should have some markings on it listing the cubic inches. Find the number and post it or look it up to determine if three wires are allowed.

I was planning on using one of those 4x4" boxes that are 1 1/2" deep. I think the box says 32 cu in on the plastic boxes.
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Old 08-14-2015, 09:13 PM   #27
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I was planning on using one of those 4x4" boxes that are 1 1/2" deep. I think the box says 32 cu in on the plastic boxes.

plenty big enough for (3) 12-2 w/g romex wires
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Old 08-15-2015, 03:20 AM   #28
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plenty big enough for (3) 12-2 w/g romex wires
Yep, plenty big. Heck, a single gang would of been big enough honestly.
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Old 08-15-2015, 03:22 AM   #29
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Despite popular opinion, electrical is easy to do. Not hard to connect point A to point B without screwing up. Doing electrical to code however, can be a PITA.
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Old 08-15-2015, 08:27 AM   #30
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Despite popular opinion, electrical is easy to do. Not hard to connect point A to point B without screwing up. Doing electrical to code however, can be a PITA.

Yeah, I found this to be the case with almost anything in the house. The only thing I won't touch is gas.

Despite the fact I don't know terms I've actually done more than most, I just hadn't seen someone connect 3 strands of wires together so I wasn't sure if that was the proper way or not. I'm very ocd so I secure everything as much as possible.


Thanks for the advice.
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