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Old 12-31-2016, 08:07 PM   #1
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Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


Hi:

I have an existing 220V line run in my garage to a safety switch that is hardwired into my air compressor. I need to add a 220V 6-50R outlet. I would like to do this by adding a new outlet adjacent to an existing junction box, but I'm not sure if this kind of parallel wiring is OK with 220v. I will be turning the air compressor off at the safety switch any time I am using the 220v outlet. Attached is a diagram that I made to try to explain what it is I want to do. If someone more knowledgeable than me could weight in I'd greatly appreciate it!

-Skippy
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Old 12-31-2016, 09:22 PM   #2
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


A 50 A socket served by a 30 A breaker - and, presumably, 30 A rated wiring - would not be allowed.
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Old 12-31-2016, 09:51 PM   #3
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


The device being plugged into this socket is a Miller 211 welder which according to them should be on a 25 or 30 amp fuse/breaker. The welder comes with a 6-50P cord.

-Skippy
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Old 12-31-2016, 11:18 PM   #4
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippy77 View Post
The device being plugged into this socket is a Miller 211 welder which according to them should be on a 25 or 30 amp fuse/breaker. The welder comes with a 6-50P cord.

-Skippy
The circuit breaker is there to protect the wiring from a load beyond its current carrying capacity. Such a load may cause the wiring to overheat and cause a fire!
If you install a 50 A socket, while YOU may not plug in anything which draws more than 30 A, a subsequent owner may - and it is NOT according to code.

You could rewire and install a 50 A Breaker and a 6-50 socket!

A cheaper option would be, if your device requires no more than 30 A, you could
install a 6-30 socket and
change the cord/plug on the welder.

If this would void the warranty on the welder, you could
install a 6-30 socket and
make up an adapter with a 6-30 plug and a 6-50 socket.

This also is not "according to code" - but, only you need to know about it!

You also probably need a second 30 A Safety Switch for the new Outlet.

Last edited by FrodoOne; 12-31-2016 at 11:22 PM. Reason: Safety Switch
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Old 12-31-2016, 11:22 PM   #5
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


Thanks for the input FrodoOne. I appreciate it. Is splitting a receptacle off as I proposed acceptable? As long as it is 30 amp.

Last edited by Skippy77; 12-31-2016 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 01-01-2017, 04:08 AM   #6
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


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Thanks for the input FrodoOne. I appreciate it. Is splitting a receptacle off as I proposed acceptable? As long as it is 30 amp.
With the caveat that it should be GFCI protected, I believe so.

However, you should note that I am NOT in North America.

One hopes that someone with better knowledge of the local situation will come to your aid. (Since I have not so far been "corrected" perhaps I have been right, up to this point.)

In this country, virtually ALL circuits must now be protected by RCDs, RCBOs, GFCIs (or whatever name they are given locally) at the main panel or sub panel.
Individual protected outlets were/are available but now are hardly ever used here.
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Old 01-01-2017, 10:45 AM   #7
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


240 volt circuit do not require GFCI under the NEC.



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Old 01-01-2017, 10:49 AM   #8
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


Your manufactures instructions call for a 15 or 20 amp circuit with a 25/30 amp fuse/breaker. Don't connect to a 30 amp circuit.

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Old 01-01-2017, 12:25 PM   #9
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


Quote:
15 or 20 amp circuit with a 25/30 amp fuse/breaker.
Please explain how this would even be possible.
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Old 01-01-2017, 01:07 PM   #10
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


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Originally Posted by rjniles View Post
Your manufactures instructions call for a 15 or 20 amp circuit with a 25/30 amp fuse/breaker. Don't connect to a 30 amp circuit.

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I think you're looking at the column for 120V on the right. This welder has an adapter plug that allows it to be powered from either 120v, or 240v single phase. I will be setting it up for the 240v single phase which is the column on the left.
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Old 01-01-2017, 01:20 PM   #11
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


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240 volt circuit do not require GFCI under the NEC.



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Agree with that, BUT the only reason NEC hasn't extended itself there is because on instabilities in GFCI logic design -- on the industrial side, that's been largely overcome and GFCIs are available and used at that voltage and higher. I expect NEC to more fully adopt GFCI at higher voltages (for residential) in the near future.
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Old 01-01-2017, 01:22 PM   #12
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


OP -- the design you're proposing is a bit messy and with that NEMA 6-50 sitting there future users might be confused (and electrocuted or start a fire). Any decent home inspector or building inspector official would CRINGE.
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Old 01-01-2017, 01:40 PM   #13
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


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OP -- the design you're proposing is a bit messy and with that NEMA 6-50 sitting there future users might be confused (and electrocuted or start a fire). Any decent home inspector or building inspector official would CRINGE.
Thanks for the input. I definitely want to do it the right way. The plug on the welder is a 6-50. I could redo all of this with a 50 amp breaker and appropriately sized wires. It strange that it specifies a 30 amp breaker with minimum 14 gauge wire and has a 6-50P on the welder.
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Old 01-01-2017, 02:44 PM   #14
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


NEMA 6-50 is the most common on welders (reasonably low duty cycle/input amps varieties) so the Lincolns, Millers of the world use it thinking most shops have 6-50Rs installed.

I have TIG, MIG, SMAW (NEMA 6-50P, L6-20P, L14-30P) and just use short 12" adapters cables, 6-4 SOOW plugged into a NEMA 14-50R...........keeps the "infrastructure" code compliant.......

The 211 is a great MIG Machine...........you can always just change the plug to a 30A type like FrodoOne recommended.............

Is there a magnetic starter on your compressor and are you using time delays in the safety switch?
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Old 01-01-2017, 03:08 PM   #15
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Re: Adding a new 220V outlet to Existing line


The air compressor does not have a magnetic starter. I am using 30 amp time delay fuses in the safety switch. When I installed it I was worried the amps might spike when it kicked on, so far I haven't had any issues with it.
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