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-   -   Adding GFCI Breaker to Ground Outlets?? (https://www.diychatroom.com/f18/adding-gfci-breaker-ground-outlets-123043/)

joerunner2 11-10-2011 08:51 PM

Adding GFCI Breaker to Ground Outlets??
 
Hey Everyone,

I have a house with full rooms of two prong outlets that exist on the same breakers. I was told by a local home improvement teacher that if I replace the breaker with a GFCI breaker of the same size I can safely put in three prong outlets. Want to check and see if they were telling me the truth?

Thanks.

gregzoll 11-10-2011 09:17 PM

Do a search on here. This is a subject that has been beaten to death, more than the proverbial dead horse.




joerunner2 11-10-2011 10:17 PM

Re: Did a search and can't find anything but GFCI outlets, not GFCI breakers.
 
I didn't find anything on whether it is safe to replace a regular breaker with GFCI breaker and then switch outlets to three prong. All I get is trading out two prong for GFCI outlets. If you would be so kind to answer this question again in this post it would be appreicated. Thank You.

gregzoll 11-10-2011 10:36 PM

First thing is, what panel do you have, and what is the age of the wiring that is in the structure already? Also, is it BX, Knob & Tube, Romex, Aluminum wiring? The only way to give you a proper answer on the breaker swap, is more info. In theory, the breaker would work the same as the outlet, but not as good, as if there was a ground in the circuit.




jimmy21 11-10-2011 11:23 PM

39 Attachment(s)
you can legally put a 3 prong receptacle on circuit with no ground if it is gfci protected and you label the receptacles "no equipment ground." This isnt as safe as having a ground, but it is a legal, code compliant installation

Billy_Bob 11-10-2011 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimmy21 (Post 768342)
you can legally put a 3 prong receptacle on circuit with no ground if it is gfci protected and you label the receptacles "no equipment ground." This isnt as safe as having a ground, but it is a legal, code compliant installation

Right! They need to be labeled "no equipment ground".

mpoulton 11-11-2011 12:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joerunner2 (Post 768307)
I didn't find anything on whether it is safe to replace a regular breaker with GFCI breaker and then switch outlets to three prong. All I get is trading out two prong for GFCI outlets. If you would be so kind to answer this question again in this post it would be appreicated. Thank You.

It's an identical solution. You will probably find that it's cheaper and easier to just replace the first receptacle on each circuit with a GFCI instead of using GFCI breakers, though.

jimmy21 11-11-2011 02:23 AM

39 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by mpoulton (Post 768365)
It's an identical solution. You will probably find that it's cheaper and easier to just replace the first receptacle on each circuit with a GFCI instead of using GFCI breakers, though.

If you know where the first receptacle is. Older homes it may hit a light switch then 3 junction boxes then branch out to receptacles from there

matt151617 11-12-2011 06:32 AM

Are you sure your boxes aren't grounded? Many times the ground wire was terminated at the box somewhere since it wasn't used when the wiring was installed. Get a tester and see if the box itself is grounded, and you can just install a jumper cable from the outlet to the box.

Jim Port 11-12-2011 12:16 PM

Using a GFI breaker or receptacle does not add a ground to a receptacle. It only allows 3 hole receptacles to be installed on ungrounded circuits.


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