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Old 06-06-2010, 05:45 PM   #1
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add outlets in basement


I have found a circuit that has an outlet on it and nothing leaving it, it has three wires in and none out. The three wires are black, white and uncovered (grounding). I assume it is the end of that particular circuit. It has 12/2 wire into it and is on a 20A circuit. It is an outlet just like a regular wall outlet. It powers a 1 HP motor for a jacuzzi type tub which is simply plugged into it. It is under the tub and is accessible only through the floor underneath via the basement. This is an ordinary outlet that is completely dedicated to this 1HP motor for the jacuzzi. If I had not moved the insulation under the floor of the house which is the ceiling of the basement then this would have never been seen. I want to add up to eight outlets on this line. I anticipate using 12/2 wire which I have purchased and putting a GFI as the first additional outlet. After that, I have two extra GFI on hand and the regular outlets needed. I have never done this type thing. I am sure which breaker to turn off as I plugged a fan into the outlet and threw breakers until the fan turned off. So, do I just add the new wire into the other side of the outlet and run to the GFI? From there I anticipate running to the next outlet, out its other side and so on in a series. Do I need to add the other two GFI anywhere in this new circuit? This an unfinished basement that hasnt yet had water problems. I do not anticipate ever running more than three 110v appliances at one time. The lighting is on a separate circuit. thanx so much for any advice
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Old 06-06-2010, 06:30 PM   #2
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Usually these tubs & the pumps that power them require a dedicated
circuit
Thats why its installed under the tub & the only outlet on the circuit



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Old 06-06-2010, 06:45 PM   #3
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And if that existing outlet is not a GFCI, and not fed from a GFCI circuit breaker, it probably should be... Water & electricity and all that.
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Old 06-07-2010, 12:52 AM   #4
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So I cannot tap into that circuit?
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Old 06-07-2010, 07:36 AM   #5
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My jacuzzi tub has 2 circuits as the heater & pump take 19a combined
Both are GFCI protected

You would need to verify the Mfg instructions
A 1hp pump could take up to 14 amps depending upon model

I would run a new circuit for the outlets
Unfinished basement requires GFCI protection



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Old 06-07-2010, 08:10 AM   #6
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Do not tap into this circuit. Create a new circuit for your 12 new receptacles.
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Old 06-07-2010, 08:55 AM   #7
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Thank you both, I like and understand clear instructions such as "do not". Now, as I said, I am an extreme amateur. I have never extended any circuit or wired anything. However, I can follow instructions when given clearly. I have access to another outlet that is already GFI protected. It already continues to another outlet that is in the basement as well. It is built into a wall that was built to conform to "code". The wall has no load bearing capacity but is there as a fire retardant. It is merely sheetrock and studs. The outlet is clearly accessible from the rear but it does have wires to another outlet already. There is no other outlet that an amateur can access. Anything else would require "fishing" a wire to the breaker panel and I cannot do that.
Can I add another set of wires to an outlet that ALREADY has two sets of wires in it? Two sets means one in and one out. One 12/2 in and one 12/2 out. I did forget to mention that this circuit WILL have a window unit AC on 24/7. The unit will cool one space of 16 x 12 that is heavily insulated and will be set no lower than 85. The AC is more for humidity control than actual cooling. The AC should not run much. thanx Oh yeah, be frank. If you do not feel me capable, say so, no offense taken. Thanks again for your timely replies.

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Old 06-07-2010, 09:17 AM   #8
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What size is the AC ? How much power does it draw ?
I usually run a dedicated circuit for a window AC (12k+ BTU)
I do use the dedicated circuit for other uses - since we use AC less then 14 days a year

Is there anything else on this circuit ?
Have you verified by shutting the breaker off & checking to see that everything else is still working



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Old 06-07-2010, 11:59 AM   #9
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You can add another wire leading in series to the other outlets you want to install. Depending on jurisdiction, you are allowed a certain number of wires and wire nuts depending on the depth of the box and the guage of the wires, but in most cases you would be fine with three wires one in, and two out.

I am certainly no expert, and I just did my first electrical job (adding three ceiling fixtures and three wall switches to control them). Assuming the walls are unfinished such that you can add the new outlets without taking down drywall or wire fishing then the skills needed are fairly low, all you need is:

1. Basic understanding of how to wire in outlets
2. Know how to run wire to your local code
3. Have a non-contact voltage tester that beeps when near a live wire (very very handy) and a good pair of wire strippers
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Old 06-07-2010, 12:23 PM   #10
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To add another wire to this receptacle will require pigtailing. Take the two wires that are conencted to the receptacle off the receptacle. Connect them together with the new black wire and a short 6 inch pigtail of black wire. Connect the pigtail to the receptacle gold screw. Do the same for the whites and the grounds.
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:29 AM   #11
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I went to the breaker panel and threw switches until the two outlets in the garage went dead, there are only two. I plugged a fan into each one and watched it stop to confirm which breaker switch controlled them, it is the same switch. If anything else is on them it is not in the garage. The size AC used will be the smallest one capable of cooling 200 sq ft. As I mentioned this is more for humidity control as there are valuable metal items in there. Of course it would make it way more comfortable to work in should the need arise.
On the pigtail, do you pigtail down the wire and attach one end to the recepatacle as the "pigtailed" part would be twice as thick now? "Down the wire" means enough inches away from the receptacle box to enable the twisting. Do you bare the original wire for a few inches or just a part of the original wire? If you bare a few inches then I am sure all would have to be rewrapped with tape. Then I suppose you wrap the "pigtail" in electricians tape? thanx
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Old 06-08-2010, 06:05 AM   #12
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This shows pigtailing the white wires



Only terminate one wire under a device screw.
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Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
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Old 06-08-2010, 12:35 PM   #13
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I'm somewhat concerned you might be confused, but that could just be me being confused from your last post, so just to be very clear.

You have an existing outlet box with one 12/2 in (Wire 1) and one 12/2 out (Wire 2)

You are going to add another 12/2 going out (Wire 3) to a new outlet box.

Wire 1 black should be connected to wire 2 black, wire 3 black, and a short black wire (called a pigtail) which is connected to the existing outlet.

Do the exact same with whites, and with grounds and you should be home free.
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Old 06-08-2010, 06:49 PM   #14
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Thanks fellows. Thanks so much for the pic, it spoke a thousand words. Trog, you are right and thank you for defining "pigtail". I thought it referred to the twisted part when you join one or more wires! The third wire will leave an already installed receptacle. The third wire will then power several more outlets, only one will be working all the time. That is whenever a window unit AC comes on. The rest, and I envision seven or eight more will be seldom used. They are just going to be there when needed. All eight would never be used, they are just for convenience in plugging in something. You know, a shorter extension cord or no extension at all. Now, since they will come off a GFI, do I need more GFIs in the circuit? I have three so might as well use them. Right? thanx again
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