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Old 11-25-2010, 10:15 PM   #16
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Yeah, that post was so garbled I didn't even process it
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Old 11-26-2010, 12:54 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
Usually red is cosidered hot,
Black is considered neutral,
Green is ground.
Because neutral is normally connectted to ground in main board,
Thats why you are reading 120v
from red to green.
But if your source of supply is normally 120v,
then to get 240v requires connection across two phases.
Your black wire should also read 120v to green.
So the black wire has lost its supply.
Follow it back to the main board and find where.
I hope you are not mixed up with Dc low voltage system they are diffrent on colour codes and the black conductor in North Americian side is hot or line so please check your statement and facts where you got this infomation from.

If you are used to automotive system the household system is NOT the same as automotive system at all.

To OP

If possible if you can take a photo one of us will able tell you what breaker you have there.

Merci.
Marc
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Old 11-26-2010, 12:57 AM   #18
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?!

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the only manufacturer with double-pole common-trip "slim" breakers that actually connect to BOTH legs (and I don't mean the stupid 4-way tandems with that contraption that connects the two outer ones) IS GE?
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Old 11-26-2010, 01:58 AM   #19
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Face it, a 60A half-width breaker *IS* going to get warm in use. "too hot to touch" would definitely indicate a problem. Arcing is usually audible if you listen closely enough.

I'm not saying you should or should not replace that breaker, just giving you what I think might be relevant information.
Agreed. Exactly squares with what I experienced. Obviously you have a lots of experience with these. Damn...hard to type after vinos and food. Anyway for anyone else following this, good info.

I have to admit, I allowed my judgement to be clouded by a "specialist" whose interest was selling me a new package unit. I get that these guys have to make a living, but be careful. You probably know as much as they do.
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Old 11-26-2010, 06:38 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emolatur View Post
?!

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the only manufacturer with double-pole common-trip "slim" breakers that actually connect to BOTH legs (and I don't mean the stupid 4-way tandems with that contraption that connects the two outer ones) IS GE?
I believe you are correct. They still don't make one rated for 60 amps.
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Old 11-26-2010, 07:05 AM   #21
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In a 240 volt circuit on a 120/240 volt system, neither wire is referred to as neutral. For a 240 volt only circuit, white/black cable may be used in the U.S.

By the way, what good is a slim 2 pole tandem breaker that provides 240 volts (compared with a double width breaker)? The slim one would also have to span two slots and therefore might as well be a 4 pole double wide breaker.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 11-26-2010 at 07:17 AM.
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Old 11-26-2010, 07:33 AM   #22
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By the way, what good is a slim 2 pole tandem breaker that provides 240 volts (compared with a double width breaker)? The slim one would also have to span two slots and therefore might as well be a 4 pole double wide breaker.
You can place a slim single pole breaker on either side of the slim 2 pole. This gives a 240 volt circuit and 2 - 120 volt circuits in 2 slots in your panel. Not that I am enamored with it but that what was done in my house.
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Old 11-26-2010, 09:06 AM   #23
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Quote:
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In a 240 volt circuit on a 120/240 volt system, neither wire is referred to as neutral. For a 240 volt only circuit, white/black cable may be used in the U.S.

By the way, what good is a slim 2 pole tandem breaker that provides 240 volts (compared with a double width breaker)? The slim one would also have to span two slots and therefore might as well be a 4 pole double wide breaker.
They do connect to both busses on GE panels they are compatible with.
They will not work on all GE panels.
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Old 11-26-2010, 10:08 AM   #24
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Quote:
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In a 240 volt circuit on a 120/240 volt system, neither wire is referred to as neutral. For a 240 volt only circuit, white/black cable may be used in the U.S.

By the way, what good is a slim 2 pole tandem breaker that provides 240 volts (compared with a double width breaker)? The slim one would also have to span two slots and therefore might as well be a 4 pole double wide breaker.
The GE slims are different from the other manufacturers. All typical panels have the horizontal bus connections. The GE ones have some vertical bits also that the slim breakers connect to, in between the horizontal bits, so it's possible to insert a single slim, or a double slim that grabs both vertical bits.
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Old 11-26-2010, 10:24 AM   #25
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I believe you are correct. They still don't make one rated for 60 amps.
H'mmm...

Good point. You are probably correct, which puts me back into "very puzzled mode".

I did search for THQP260 and found several companies offering to sell me a refurbished one, so maybe they did exist at some point?

I note that GE definitely does not currently manufacture one.
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