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Old 06-28-2009, 09:01 PM   #1
 
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220v to well, need to step down to 110v also


I have a water well pump that is 220v, can I come off the well connection with maybe a step down transformer to 110v to run a light in the well house and maybe a light in the shed next to the well house? the well pump pulls 2.5amps, and its on a 30 amp breaker on the outside of the house. not sure if that makes a diff or not. Thanks
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Old 06-28-2009, 09:05 PM   #2
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What type of wire runs to the well house? Size of and number of conductor?

If you have the proper cable there, a simple sub-panel should do the trick without the need for a transformer.

Also, where is the pressure switch located?
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Old 06-28-2009, 09:12 PM   #3
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I'd like to see a well pump that pulls 2.5 amps?


Quote:
Originally Posted by dcdoc View Post
I have a water well pump that is 220v, can I come off the well connection with maybe a step down transformer to 110v to run a light in the well house and maybe a light in the shed next to the well house? the well pump pulls 2.5amps, and its on a 30 amp breaker on the outside of the house. not sure if that makes a diff or not. Thanks
That's less than 1/4 HP? Are you sure?
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Old 06-28-2009, 09:13 PM   #4
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If it is like 99.9% of the wells I have seen it is fed with only a 2-wire. If it is newer, or if you are lucky, it will have a ground. A neutral is highly unlikely.

I am also wondering what size wire is feeding this well. WHY is there a 30A breaker if the load is only < 3A?
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Old 06-28-2009, 09:35 PM   #5
 
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The pressure switch is located on the front of the tank, very easy to get too. its a brand new set up, about a year old. I'll have to double check the amps for the pump and the wiring tommorow.
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Old 06-28-2009, 10:59 PM   #6
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The main thing to check is the wiring type and size.

If you have a three wire system that has two hots, a neutral and a ground (wire or conduit), you can probably set a small sub panel and get both 120 and 240 volts out there.
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:16 AM   #7
 
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Even if you only have 2 wires I think you can put in a subpanel and put in a 230v bulb.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/1E243
Tell me if I'm wrong.
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Old 06-29-2009, 10:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vann View Post
Even if you only have 2 wires I think you can put in a subpanel and put in a 230v bulb.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/1E243
Tell me if I'm wrong.
Yes, they do make 230 volt bulbs. And yes, a 230 volt bulb requires no neutral. But the motor circuit is a dedicated circuit and I am not certain about a splice for the lamp holder on this circuit. Someone can explain further. I am not sure how this could be done correctly, but yes you are correct, it can be done. But is it compliant? Thats the question. I am asking? Others?
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Old 06-29-2009, 11:06 AM   #9
 
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Well putting in a subpanel should take care of the dedicated motor circuit problem, but like you said I'm not sure of the compliance of this to the code.
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Even if you only have 2 wires I think you can put in a subpanel and put in a 230v bulb.
I like that train of thought. 240V fluorescent strip fixtures should be easy enough to find.
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Old 06-30-2009, 12:49 AM   #11
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A lot of fluorescent fixtures these days have multi-volt ballasts. They will operate on any voltage from 120 to 277. The neutral doesn't need to be grounded.

The older core-and-coils 277 volt ballasts will operate on 240, but the lamps won't last as long, and they won't start as well when it's cold.

There's nothing in the code, that I know of, that says you can't have a 240 volt fixture.

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Old 06-30-2009, 08:54 AM   #12
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The only thing I can think of that would prevent a 240 V light in this instance would be the 30 A circuit. In residences (and I would think a pump house counts as part of the residence), 30 A circuits are not allowed to supply light fixtures.

If you changed the breaker to 20 A, or installed a subpanel at the pump, and used a 2-pole switch for the light, you would be good to go. Also, I would put a big label on the light and switch. Something like:

"WARNING: 240 Volts.
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Old 06-30-2009, 12:46 PM   #13
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I would think a subpanel in the well house would be fine, but as soon as you have light out there you're going to want outlets for a battery charger or something else in the shed. I would look into the 120 volt route verses the 230/240 volt route, it will be much better in the long run and provide for a lot more flexibility in the future.
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