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Old 12-30-2009, 12:46 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
Wow sounds like this electrician is full of fail. I installed my dryer receptacle in my new house as the old dryer was hard wired to the panel (lol) and even I knew to use 30 amps just from basic research. Even if he thought it was gas he should have at least used 10/3 to future proof it.

When I bought my dryer it came with the cord but maybe it's because they installed it at the store. I've never had to install the cord myself on an appliance, but I would imagine it's not too hard.
Yeah the store must have installed it for you, everyone I've ever seen does not come with plug installed on it.

Common sense should have told this electrician that if he was wiring for a dryer to ask gas or electric. If i were the OP i would have someone inspect all the other work this guy did.
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Old 12-30-2009, 02:13 PM   #17
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A gas dryer wouldn't need a 240 circuit.
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:08 PM   #18
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Yeah the store must have installed it for you, everyone I've ever seen does not come with plug installed on it.

Common sense should have told this electrician that if he was wiring for a dryer to ask gas or electric. If i were the OP i would have someone inspect all the other work this guy did.

I agree with Paelectrician .,

I will ask the owner of that place if they are going with gaz or electrique dryer and I always automatic ask them even thru if they use gaz I still go ahead and run the electrique 240v 30 amp for dryer in case that person change their mind with it which it allready happend couple time and they thanks me for the foward thought ditto with stove as well.

Merci,Marc
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Old 01-01-2010, 10:48 PM   #19
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just wanted to close the loop on this one. i yanked out the double pole 20A breaker, put in a double pole 30A breaker. i ran a new 10-3 line from the breaker to the wall near the dryer. i replaced the receptacle to a 30A one, and installed a new power cord that's 30A as well. everything appears to be working fine so far.

the only thing is, i first installed a surface-mount 4-wire 30A receptacle, coupled with a 4-wire 30A power cord. then i found out the receptacle is so thick on the wall that i can't push my dryer all the way in under the counter top. i had to then go back to HD and got a 3-wire 30A recetacle that is flush-mount, and a corresponding 3-wire power cord. so i just left the ground wire in my 10-3 line un-attached, and hooked up the 2 hot and 1 neutral wire. on the dryer it seems that the neutral and the ground is connected so i guess this is OK. please let me know if this is not the case.

thanks guys!
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Old 01-01-2010, 10:54 PM   #20
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just wanted to close the loop on this one. i yanked out the double pole 20A breaker, put in a double pole 30A breaker. i ran a new 10-3 line from the breaker to the wall near the dryer. i replaced the receptacle to a 30A one, and installed a new power cord that's 30A as well. everything appears to be working fine so far.

the only thing is, i first installed a surface-mount 4-wire 30A receptacle, coupled with a 4-wire 30A power cord. then i found out the receptacle is so thick on the wall that i can't push my dryer all the way in under the counter top. i had to then go back to HD and got a 3-wire 30A recetacle that is flush-mount, and a corresponding 3-wire power cord. so i just left the ground wire in my 10-3 line un-attached, and hooked up the 2 hot and 1 neutral wire. on the dryer it seems that the neutral and the ground is connected so i guess this is OK. please let me know if this is not the case.

thanks guys!
Do you understand that the ground is there for your personal safety???
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Old 01-01-2010, 10:56 PM   #21
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so should i leave the neutral wire un-attached? there are only 3 terminals on the receptacle. the dryer instruction states that it requires the neutral wire in a 3-wire configuration. i guess i am confused.
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Old 01-01-2010, 10:59 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by ninghai View Post
just wanted to close the loop on this one. i yanked out the double pole 20A breaker, put in a double pole 30A breaker. i ran a new 10-3 line from the breaker to the wall near the dryer. i replaced the receptacle to a 30A one, and installed a new power cord that's 30A as well. everything appears to be working fine so far.

the only thing is, i first installed a surface-mount 4-wire 30A receptacle, coupled with a 4-wire 30A power cord. then i found out the receptacle is so thick on the wall that i can't push my dryer all the way in under the counter top. i had to then go back to HD and got a 3-wire 30A recetacle that is flush-mount, and a corresponding 3-wire power cord. so i just left the ground wire in my 10-3 line un-attached, and hooked up the 2 hot and 1 neutral wire. on the dryer it seems that the neutral and the ground is connected so i guess this is OK. please let me know if this is not the case.

thanks guys!
That is plain wrong to do that and you can NOT go back to 3 wire format you have to stay with 4 wire format the code is very strict with this.

there is something wrong with this set up and I really advise you do not do anything more with the electrical system senice your so called electrician work on this place and IMO there are few legal issue allready arised now.

Merci,Marc
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Old 01-01-2010, 11:06 PM   #23
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Would you mind explaining it to me? I really would like to learn.

1. The dryer installation manual clearly states that you can either use a 3-wire cord, or a 4-wire cord.

2. Home Depot sells 3-wire dryer cord and 3-wire 30A receptacle. The sales guy told me it is with code or they wouldn't sell it.
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Old 01-01-2010, 11:20 PM   #24
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Would you mind explaining it to me? I really would like to learn.

1. The dryer installation manual clearly states that you can either use a 3-wire cord, or a 4-wire cord.

2. Home Depot sells 3-wire dryer cord and 3-wire 30A receptacle. The sales guy told me it is with code or they wouldn't sell it.
Sure very simple .,,

due you allready have new construction in your place right ??

then the code is very specfic that you only can run 4 wire set up can not use 3 wire set up for your electrique dryer.

The only time you can use the 3 wire is if you have older home and it is a oringal wire or wired before 1996 that time before that year it can allowed but after 1996 it is not legal any more the same thing with older home when they rewire or relocated the dryer or stove { this part do cover as well } they must use 4 wire set up the 3 wire is no longer legit after 1996.

There is 4 wire recessed receptale for your dryer I do not know why your so called " electrician " used surface mounted receptale that is not really kosher that is really lack of common sense there.

as far for Home Depot store personalles I just really can't comment too much without cussing in French so therefore a simple answer they know nothing about the codes most are just a workers in the HD store and they move around and most of them are not really aware with codes at all.

expect few workers whom are famuair with codes they stay in that department much longer.

Merci,Marc
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Old 01-01-2010, 11:37 PM   #25
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Makes sense. I didn't see any flush mount 240V 30A 4-wire receptacle at HD, that's why I went with the surface-mount and later found the dimension wouldn't work. And then I went wit the 3-wire flush-mount. I knew 4-wire is safer but thought 3-wire is OK too.

I will replace it with a 4-wire flush mount model once I found it somewhere else.

Meanwhile, does what you said about the 4-wire requirement apply to 20A as well? I found my washer is on a 240V 20A 3-wire receptacle as well.

BTW, this is an old home but we gutted everything so all wiring is new.

Thanks!
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Old 01-01-2010, 11:53 PM   #26
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Makes sense. I didn't see any flush mount 240V 30A 4-wire receptacle at HD, that's why I went with the surface-mount and later found the dimension wouldn't work. And then I went wit the 3-wire flush-mount. I knew 4-wire is safer but thought 3-wire is OK too.

I will replace it with a 4-wire flush mount model once I found it somewhere else.
There is no excuse for HD store not to stock the 4 wire recessed dryer recetpale at all I know my local HD store in Wisconsin do stock them.
Quote:
Meanwhile, does what you said about the 4-wire requirement apply to 20A as well? I found my washer is on a 240V 20A 3-wire receptacle as well.

BTW, this is an old home but we gutted everything so all wiring is new.

Thanks!
for your washer you will need to check your owner manual if they required netural conductor or not if not you can keep the 12-3 NM there just fold back the netural but DO NOT cut it off just cap it off and use the straght 6-20R that will meet the code if the washer required straght 240 volt circuit.

Typical most North Americian washer do require 120 v 20 amp circuit { not the same with European verison they reqired 240 volt 16/20 amp circuit }

I am not sure but somewhere in the thread you mention 10-3 NM for dryer if so that fine otherwise the 12-3 NM is not legal for dryer espcally on 30 amp circuit this is very serious issue here

Ok with old home that allready gutted and all the wiring is new so there are a bit of code will be apply to this so we treat them like new construction wiring so nothing is grandfathered at all due you open the walls that is clear case with the codes.

so therefore not only in this thead and the other thread as you know I did reply in other thread as well and really I think you should stop at the moment and get the photo uploaded so we can verify if this is correct set up to meet the codes a photo worth a thousand words here so take couple at the breaker box and get one for dryer receptale as well so one of us will steer you in right direction.

P.S. I am Electrician by trade in both USA and France so few members here are Electrician as well so they will tell you the straght answer as well.

Merci,Marc
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Old 01-02-2010, 08:49 AM   #27
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just wanted to close the loop on this one. i yanked out the double pole 20A breaker, put in a double pole 30A breaker. i ran a new 10-3 line from the breaker to the wall near the dryer. i replaced the receptacle to a 30A one, and installed a new power cord that's 30A as well. everything appears to be working fine so far.
Any new wiring you do will need to be re-inspected by the Inspector

I have not heard of a 240v washer
Is this a stacked combo unit with washer & dryer ?
Is it a high end washer with steam capabilities ?

Once you have gutted all the wiring you are now required to meet all new codes



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Old 01-02-2010, 10:08 AM   #28
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Just to clarify the reasoning on the four wire system. Your dryer probably requires 240 volts for the drying circuit, and 120 volts for the controls. The drying circuit runs off the two hot wires, typically red and black, which are 240 volts with respect to each other.

The 120 volt circuit runs off one of the hot wires, and a neutral, which should be white. It also needs an independent equipment ground, which is the green wire. Hence four wires, two hots (red and black), a neutral (white), and an independent equipment ground (green).

Older dryers only used 3 wire cords, and they are grandfathered in provided you did not run new wiring (you reused old wiring). In the three wire setup, the grounding strap from the dryer is attached to the neutral rather than being attached to an independent equipment ground (the green wire).
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Old 01-02-2010, 10:59 AM   #29
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I don't know abut the USA, but dryer receptacles here are face plates that mount to a box. So once the box is there you put which ever receptacle in you need.

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Old 01-02-2010, 02:45 PM   #30
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What Joed show the photo that is Canada verison of 4 wire recessed dryer recptale and here the typical USA 4 wire recessed dryer receptale look like { I am sure Joed did see simauir to this as well }

Anyway here what it look like




plus you have to get the recetpale cover to fit this.

Merci, Marc
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