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Old 06-04-2010, 09:45 AM   #1
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2 circuits for duplex plug


Is it ok to run two 12/2 to a duplex 20 amp plug so it is two seperate circuits? I know normally 12/3 would be use with a double pole breaker, but 12/3 seems to be hard to come by. I'm just wondering if there are issues with the fact that it would be two seperate single pole breakers for the same duplex plug. As long as the proper neutrals are used I suppose it's ok right? Just need to break both tabs on the plug.
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Old 06-04-2010, 10:00 AM   #2
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Needs to be a 2 pole breaker as both circuits are on the same yoke.
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Old 06-04-2010, 10:15 AM   #3
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Ditto what brric said, but since when has 12/3 been hard to find? Where are you looking... WalMart?
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Old 06-04-2010, 10:17 AM   #4
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Checked Canadian Tire and Home depot. They had 14/3 but not 12/3. If I use two 12/2 with a double pole 20amp breaker, would I just leave out one neutral or still use both?
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Old 06-04-2010, 11:09 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
Checked Canadian Tire and Home depot. They had 14/3 but not 12/3. If I use two 12/2 with a double pole 20amp breaker, would I just leave out one neutral or still use both?
You will use both. Break the neutral tab and the hot tab on the recep.
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Old 06-04-2010, 06:44 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
Checked Canadian Tire and Home depot. They had 14/3 but not 12/3. If I use two 12/2 with a double pole 20amp breaker, would I just leave out one neutral or still use both?
CTC and HD only stock what is in demand. For 12/3 you would have to go to an electrical trade supplier. And these guys won't cut what you need. You would have to buy a box or a spool.
#12 Romex was/is rarely used for residential service here. It really wasn't required until GFCI's were needed in the kitchen.
GFCI's are a problem with MBRC's so the code was changed to require a 12/2 circuit to the kitchen. (following the US lead)
In one respect this change is unfortunate as I often require in excess of 3000 watts in my kitchen and a single 20 amp circuit wouldn't be adequate. (2400 watts)
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Old 06-04-2010, 08:21 PM   #7
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you can still run the 15A split on the kitchen counter ...you just have to get a two pole gfci breaker for it and your good to go.
if you have a gerrie electric near you they'll have 12/3 and are willing to do cuts on it and long as it's not something rediculously short like 10 feet.
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Old 06-04-2010, 08:31 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by andrew79 View Post
you can still run the 15A split on the kitchen counter ...you just have to get a two pole gfci breaker for it and your good to go.
if you have a gerrie electric near you they'll have 12/3 and are willing to do cuts on it and long as it's not something rediculously short like 10 feet.
There's a big price difference between a single pole 20 amp breaker and 2 pole GFCI breaker though!
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Old 06-04-2010, 08:36 PM   #9
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i didn't say it was a cheap way to do it
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Old 06-04-2010, 08:50 PM   #10
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There's a big price difference between a single pole 20 amp breaker and 2 pole GFCI breaker though!
Yep I was looking at that and holy crap they cost just as much as the panel itself!
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Old 06-04-2010, 08:54 PM   #11
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i didn't say it was a cheap way to do it
Nope, and I was just bemoaning that the solution protecting kitchen circuits was resolved by switching over to #12 circuits. I think it was a poor bargain.

I suppose that many thousands of people have had their lives saved by the kitchen GFCI rule.
Or would it be tens of thousands.
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Old 06-04-2010, 08:58 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildie View Post
CTC and HD only stock what is in demand. For 12/3 you would have to go to an electrical trade supplier. And these guys won't cut what you need. You would have to buy a box or a spool.
#12 Romex was/is rarely used for residential service here. It really wasn't required until GFCI's were needed in the kitchen.
GFCI's are a problem with MBRC's so the code was changed to require a 12/2 circuit to the kitchen. (following the US lead)
In one respect this change is unfortunate as I often require in excess of 3000 watts in my kitchen and a single 20 amp circuit wouldn't be adequate. (2400 watts)
Actually never thought of that. There is an electrical company near my office, though I don't know if they actually sell to general public, and it would probably be a reel bigger then a pickup truck.
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Old 06-04-2010, 09:52 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
Actually never thought of that. There is an electrical company near my office, though I don't know if they actually sell to general public, and it would probably be a reel bigger then a pickup truck.
In that case, you could split every receptacle in the house!
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