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Old 02-04-2020, 11:55 AM   #16
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Re: Radon


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoland33 View Post
His system is what is radon certified in the sense that it can tie in when a radon mitigation system is installed.
I am not aware of certification of any product/method, just installers and testers, and some states require no certification of anything radon. And best scenario is not to tie into the water drainage loop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoland33 View Post
It is called a sub floor pressure relief system.
It IS 4" corregated PVC that is going in.
That's marketing $peak for a pipe underground, any pipe directing water away from your basement relieves "pressure." But corrugated pipe for water is far inferior to solid pipe. And I still don't know why you'll have 3 pits if your old sump pump discharged maybe once a month.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoland33 View Post
Because he doesnt install radon, I don't really know an option I have to make a loop. What kind of PVC would I use anyway? If I loop it around the basement, where would the ending be in the sense of, how does the radon get into the pipe...just leave it open on one end?
A water drainage system or a radon system is just a bunch of pipes, nothing too complicated. It's your call if you DIY or have him do something. Your options:

1. Do nothing, cap the existing radon stack.
If a radon test comes back high, install a small wall exhaust fan/HRV/etc and see if it lowers. As lots is still unknown about how these radioactive particles move, take the risk that letting the radon into the occupied basement is fine. Or hire a radon company to pressure test how many new suction holes are needed at various places around the basement, run PVC across the ceiling to connect them to the radon stack, and add fan in attic.

2. Reconnect existing radon stack to a sump lid.
From AARST Standard:
Radon-sump-radon.jpg
Probably can never achieve a sealed "vacuum" because of the new drain holes put in your CMU wall, and the poly wall sheet/dimpled cove will be an air leak point. Also lots of water in pipes and sump pump action will hinder radon airflow. If a radon test comes back high, you'll probably have to abandon that. Then follow #1 solutions.

3. Stick the existing radon stack into the gravel.
Good to be separate from water, but may not pull enough air from the far reaches of the basement. If a radon test comes back high, then follow #1 solutions.

4. Install a separate radon loop.
Perforated pipe around the perimeter in the temporarily exposed trench, connect to existing radon stack. If a radon test comes back high, add a fan in the attic and done.
___________

Basically the solutions for #1-3 is the same for someone not currently doing anything about water problems. Choice #4 takes advantage of the open trench, and is what is recommended for new construction and probably eliminates a future need for a radon contractor or any additional pipes.

There are some finer details on how you do the pipes and collection points which can be discussed if you decide to DIY.
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Old 02-04-2020, 12:40 PM   #17
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Re: Radon


Quote:
Originally Posted by 3onthetree View Post
I am not aware of certification of any product/method, just installers and testers, and some states require no certification of anything radon. And best scenario is not to tie into the water drainage loop.


That's marketing $peak for a pipe underground, any pipe directing water away from your basement relieves "pressure." But corrugated pipe for water is far inferior to solid pipe. And I still don't know why you'll have 3 pits if your old sump pump discharged maybe once a month.


A water drainage system or a radon system is just a bunch of pipes, nothing too complicated. It's your call if you DIY or have him do something. Your options:

1. Do nothing, cap the existing radon stack.
If a radon test comes back high, install a small wall exhaust fan/HRV/etc and see if it lowers. As lots is still unknown about how these radioactive particles move, take the risk that letting the radon into the occupied basement is fine. Or hire a radon company to pressure test how many new suction holes are needed at various places around the basement, run PVC across the ceiling to connect them to the radon stack, and add fan in attic.

2. Reconnect existing radon stack to a sump lid.
From AARST Standard:
Attachment 584843
Probably can never achieve a sealed "vacuum" because of the new drain holes put in your CMU wall, and the poly wall sheet/dimpled cove will be an air leak point. Also lots of water in pipes and sump pump action will hinder radon airflow. If a radon test comes back high, you'll probably have to abandon that. Then follow #1 solutions.

3. Stick the existing radon stack into the gravel.
Good to be separate from water, but may not pull enough air from the far reaches of the basement. If a radon test comes back high, then follow #1 solutions.

4. Install a separate radon loop.
Perforated pipe around the perimeter in the temporarily exposed trench, connect to existing radon stack. If a radon test comes back high, add a fan in the attic and done.
___________

Basically the solutions for #1-3 is the same for someone not currently doing anything about water problems. Choice #4 takes advantage of the open trench, and is what is recommended for new construction and probably eliminates a future need for a radon contractor or any additional pipes.

There are some finer details on how you do the pipes and collection points which can be discussed if you decide to DIY.


Thanks for all the info. Gives me lots to think about.

IT only drained once every month but it wasnt connected to the drain tile. The only thing that sump drained was the stairwell to the basement which drained into that. My house is sitting in 2 feet of water becuase there is no sump to pull the water out. It has been sitting doing nothing. I never noticed it because it was functioning. It wasnt until recently that we found out there this is no connection for water to go into the sump.

IF I go with number 4, I'm just adding a full loop of pipe/perforated...and where does the water go? I'm assuming water will get in there right?
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Old 02-04-2020, 01:46 PM   #18
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Re: Radon


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoland33 View Post
IF I go with number 4, I'm just adding a full loop of pipe/perforated...and where does the water go? I'm assuming water will get in there right?
Either 4" perforated solid, or 4" corrugated slotted, both sleeved. They also sell 3" of each, but use 3" if you are only having trouble with height. I prefer solid, but corrugated is fine for the collection pipe and may be easier retrofitting around plumbing pipes or a jagged demo of the trench. It can get water, but should be installed above the plane of the footing drain tile, so if that's doing its job any water should migrate down to there. This loop should be within 12"-18" of the exterior wall.
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