Accessing AC Evaporator - HVAC - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By user_12345a
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 05-28-2020, 08:32 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 68
Default

Accessing AC Evaporator


As you can see in the photo, the access panel to the evaporator has the the connections blocking easy access. It seems that I could get in there, but it looks like a pain. I can get to the top of the evaporator through the register just above it, but I suspect that the bottom is what will need the most cleaning. My thought is that I could cut an access opening in the rear, and not deal with the connections located in the front. Assuming that there is enough clearance at the rear to allow cutting into the cavity, is this a good idea? Any other thoughts or suggestions?
Charles218 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-28-2020, 08:36 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 68
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


Sorry, the image didn't show, hopefully it is here, though sideways.
Attached Thumbnails
Accessing AC Evaporator-img_2120.jpg  
Charles218 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-28-2020, 08:51 PM   #3
Member
 
user_12345a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 12,447
Rewards Points: 52
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


To get to the bottom which is where dirt accumulates, it needs to be pulled and it's a big job which requires refrigeration tools and licenses/certifications.

Don't cut anywhere near the coil, it's very easy to cause a refrigerant leak.

How do you know the evap needs cleaning?

If the filter is of a high enough merv value and doing it's job (little to know leakage around the frame), it shouldn't require cleaning.
__________________
I am not in the business of any trade I give advice on. I have non-professional hvac experience + good knowledge of theory. Attempt repairs at your own risk. Never jump out safeties - especially pressure switches - on a furnace for testing with fuel supply on; use a meter. Do not troubleshoot with live line voltage present unless there's no alternative.

Last edited by user_12345a; 05-28-2020 at 08:53 PM.
user_12345a is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-28-2020, 08:57 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 68
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


You raise a good point, I don't know, though it is not been serviced in at least five years. It would be good to take a look and see what is going on in there though.
Charles218 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2020, 09:33 PM   #5
Member
 
user_12345a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 12,447
Rewards Points: 52
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


There are two methods that can be used to check if the coil is clean...

1. Pulling the high limit and sticking a snake camera in for visual inspection

2. Doing a static pressure drop test across the coil - manometer measures pressure differences between high limit opening (when coil is right on top of furnace)/just above furnace and downstream of coil.

Indoor coil cleaning is not part of normal maintenance.

You can check the blower assembly for dust/dirty buildup - if it's totally caked, the coil is probably dirty too.
Chris130 and u3b3rg33k like this.
__________________
I am not in the business of any trade I give advice on. I have non-professional hvac experience + good knowledge of theory. Attempt repairs at your own risk. Never jump out safeties - especially pressure switches - on a furnace for testing with fuel supply on; use a meter. Do not troubleshoot with live line voltage present unless there's no alternative.
user_12345a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 01:01 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 68
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


I understand, though I'm just a novice having never worked on my furnace before. There is a small amount of stuff that I can see from the top, I can easily shop vac that out. I don't have reason to believe there is an issue, just wanted to not ignore it any longer and take care of whatever needs attention. With today's cooler weather here in Michigan, I'm headed outside to do some maintenance on the condenser.

Thanks!
Charles218 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 01:19 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 13,496
Rewards Points: 282
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


I'm proud to see someone attempting to take care of there equipment as much as a DIY"er can. I know our tech well and occasionally he sends me pics of some of his discoveries, and some are pathetic.


I've pulled the blower and lubed it once and our tech has pulled it to be lubed 2 times in 37 years. He stated there isn't any reason to check the coils with a blower wheel that clean, that's never been cleaned . And that's with filters cheaper than dirt. Good care can make a difference.
Attached Images
     
SeniorSitizen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 02:47 PM   #8
Member
 
user_12345a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 12,447
Rewards Points: 52
Default

Re: Accessing AC Evaporator


Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles218 View Post
I understand, though I'm just a novice having never worked on my furnace before. There is a small amount of stuff that I can see from the top, I can easily shop vac that out. I don't have reason to believe there is an issue, just wanted to not ignore it any longer and take care of whatever needs attention. With today's cooler weather here in Michigan, I'm headed outside to do some maintenance on the condenser.

Thanks!
It's a good idea to get everything checked over thoroughly if you just bought the house or haven't done any maintenance for a long time.

Most of the dirt on the coil will be on the underside.
__________________
I am not in the business of any trade I give advice on. I have non-professional hvac experience + good knowledge of theory. Attempt repairs at your own risk. Never jump out safeties - especially pressure switches - on a furnace for testing with fuel supply on; use a meter. Do not troubleshoot with live line voltage present unless there's no alternative.
user_12345a is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts