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Old 05-15-2015, 08:59 AM   #31
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OK after 10 days of no rain the yard is finally nice and dry. Ive had the city and 2 landscaping companies come look at the are and they cannot offer any solution as the street is higher that the yard. One suggested a dry well, which I knew probably would not work since Im in Alabama which is full on clay. I dug about 5' deep test hole and it will all clay. Did a perc test and after 4 hours the water had dropped 2". So dry wells are out.

Now im back to the sump pump solution. Looking at and 1/2hp iON pump which is rated at 4200 GPH at 5ft. I would have the pump in a 24" x 18" sump basin which I plan to connect a couple downspouts as well as a French drain that run down the side of the house. Any one else done this and had success? Any pointers or possible concern that you see? This seems to be my only option and something has to be done since no grass will grow, shurbs are dying and a small maple tree in the back has already bit the dust.
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:03 PM   #32
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Quote:
I would have the pump in a 24" x 18" sump basin
Ayuh,.... That sounds awfully Tiny,..... 'bout 1/2 of a 55 gallon drum,....
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:24 PM   #33
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How big would you suggest?
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:01 PM   #34
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Ayuh,.... I ain't no hydrological Engineer, but yer drainin' Alota square feet, in Alabama,....

I'd think yer gonna need somethin' like a 2" line to the street,....

A bigger tank, allows less pump cycling, longer run times,....
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:32 PM   #35
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Yeah I was looking at getting a sewer pump which can handle solids and has a 2" discharge instead of 1.5". The 1/2 hp model I'm looking at is rated at 9600GPH.

Also I was thinking of drilling holes in the basin and adding rock around it. Which would in essence do the same thing at a larger basin.

Only thing that worries me about 9600GPH is I don't want it to look like a fire hydrant when it turns on, since I'm discharging on the street.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:41 AM   #36
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I've been watching your post and reading as I have about the same problem with our yard. I leaning toward a sump in the backyard and running a drain line out to a pop up in the front yard. I think your thought on the sewer pump may be a bit of an overkill. The regular sump pump should handle it and even if it has 1-1/2" outlet from the pump, once you get outside the sump container you can always increase the pipe to a 2" out to the street. I wouldn't worry to much about how much water you're discharging, as the street will be plenty wet anyway.
I see "Bondo" has been a big contributor to your posts and is quite helpful but I ran across a company out of North Carolina his site it "appledrains.com" and he has numerous "you tube" videos that you can watch for various installations. He's very thorough on the installations and may be a big help to you. I know I've picked up a lot of tips already. Now to just get the probelm resolved. Good Luck and wish me the same.
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Old 05-17-2015, 07:01 AM   #37
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This is what you have to do, not hard and you just never see anyone do it but it works and works great.Dig and put in a crock that you would put in for a sump pump for a basement, next drain all of the water to the crock anyway that you want, gravel, pipe, slopping etc; I would use drain tile myself.Drop in a sump pump into the crock and run the pipe out to the discharge area that you decide is the best; this can be above or below ground and now the problem is resolved. I have done many of these in the past with no issues.

Last edited by BrowneBearLLC; 05-17-2015 at 07:03 AM.
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Old 06-08-2015, 09:40 AM   #38
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Sump pump idea is currently on hold.

Im currently talking with my neighbor who seems to be on board with the below proposal. 1st picture below. The red line represents a French drain which will run though my neighbors back yard and discharges toward the street. There seems to be enough slope just by looking but I still need to shoot the grade just to confirm. Does this look plausible? Also if we do move forward with this, should I use 6" corrugated instead of 4"? How wide should the trench be?

The slope can somewhat been seen in the second picture. I will get a better pic this afternoon.
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Old 06-08-2015, 10:41 AM   #39
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I'm surprised your neighbor is willing to let you dig up his yard. Of course unless he's having a problem too. From looking at it you might want to just stay on your side of the fence and drain into your front yard.

As I've explained our situation before with the french drain not working, well it turned out that the storm drain line to the city system was plugged and we couldn't break thru it. I cut off the pipe and re-routed it around the landscape area and into the front yard. Luckily we had 2 1/2" of rain to test the system that weekend and the pop-up emitter in the front yard was working just fine. No more water in the basement or standing water against the back of the house. I all I'm guessing I have at least 130' of pipe in the ground and I used the 4" flexible stuff with the holes. It also had the protective sock over it. My trench was just shovel width wide. It started at about 6" deep to probably close to 20" deep at the end of the run where it turns up to the emitter in the front yard. The neighbor said that isn't going to work without something pushing the water. Well, proved him wrong. Gravity does wonders. Good Luck and hope you get yours worked out.
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Old 06-08-2015, 11:08 AM   #40
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So you have the end of your drain 20" deep and it still works with a pop up drain?
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Old 06-08-2015, 02:43 PM   #41
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Yup, it turns a 90 at the end of the run up to the level of the grass.
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Old 07-25-2015, 06:57 AM   #42
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One major thing you need to do is get rid of the water coming under the fence from your uphill neighbor. If the neighbor won't find some way to stop it, then you may have to berm your fence line or install a concrete curb.
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Old 07-25-2015, 11:08 AM   #43
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How about:

1. A dry well at the lowest point in your yard, and,
2. A dry well as close to the front of your property as possible considering #3, and,
3. An 4" underground pipe sloping down from near the top of #1 to #2, and,
4. A sump pump in #2 that discharges the water onto the driveway to run into the street.

Dry wells must not be put too close to the house. However you could have a holding tank instead which could be put close to the house.

You might be able to come up with something that is simpler and does the same thing.

You could also have dry wells large enough so you can suck the water out to water the lawn with and only under extreme conditions would the sump pump turn on.
__________________
Stick to your lawn watering schedule until it really starts to pour. After the storm you have only the same number of rest days you always had and then you need to start watering again.

Last edited by AllanJ; 07-25-2015 at 11:13 AM.
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Old 07-25-2015, 11:31 AM   #44
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Dry wells will not work. Dig some test perc holes about 5' deep. Didn't perc anywhere close to optimal. I'm in heavy clay in alabama.
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Old 07-26-2015, 04:35 PM   #45
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OK , I'm from Iowa , so I can't speak for how things are done down in 'Bama . But your house appears to be fairly new . In a new development . What does the builder/developer have to say ? Didn't they have to submit a drainage plan to the county/city based on geographical conditions ? How can a new house pass final inspection & be deemed inhabitable when part of your lot has a built in mosquito/malaria incubator ?

Again , can't speak for 'Bama , but if you were in Iowa , this would not be YOUR problem . The solution wouldn't lie in French drains , laser levels or dry wells but in a competant attorney !
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