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Old 05-21-2009, 02:09 PM   #16
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timber partially in the ground


That will last several years and then be too rotten to hold itself together. Beyond that basic problem, the caisson action of the 4' buried section will not be enough to hold back the soil pressure without the tie-back, and the tie-back connection is going to require some pretty high strength.

Have you considered a shielded slope (nice rip-rap)? you can acheive a 45 degree slope (1:1) which should get you 2/3rds of your yard back (and level). such a slope involves placing flagstones over a 45 degree slope of your native soil and chinking between the stones so that no water can wash away the soil. Putting geo-grid 6" under the face of the slope helps, and i've seen these slopes go at least 40' in height.

(sorry for the repeat post)

Last edited by asa; 05-21-2009 at 02:12 PM. Reason: repeat
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Old 05-21-2009, 02:11 PM   #17
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partially burried timber


That will last several years and then be too rotten to hold itself together. Beyond that basic problem, the caisson action of the 4' buried section will not be enough to hold back the soil pressure without the tie-back, and the tie-back connection is going to require some pretty high strength.

Have you considered a shielded slope (nice rip-rap)? you can acheive a 45 degree slope (1:1) which should get you 2/3rds of your yard back (and level). such a slope involves placing flagstones over a 45 degree slope of your native soil and chinking between the stones so that no water can wash away the soil. Putting geo-grid 6" under the face of the slope helps, and i've seen these slopes go at least 40' in height.
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Old 07-05-2015, 05:41 PM   #18
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Wow! 6 years since the last post from "ididit" about his retaining wall project and i hope he is still in touch with this chat room, because i have almost the identical situation in my backyard and had considered all the same options and came up with the same conclusion - that power poles would be the least costly way of building the wall. I would love to get a reply on what course of action ididit took and what the outcome is today. There are a couple differences in our construction ideas: First, my back wall is 11 feet tall and 40 feet long, tapering to ground level after another 40 feet. Second, the side wall is only about 5 feet high and tapering into the ground at 60 feet. The main difference between our methods is i was planning to stack the poles horizontally with vertical poles behind as support about every 5 feet, 4 feet in the ground, set in concrete. The poles are 20 feet long and brand new, treated poles. Salesman says they are guaranteed for life against rot. Not sure about that claim but that's what he said. I'm 65 so 20 years from now, who knows. I have had experience with used RR ties that are still in place after 15 years. (now starting to show rot in a couple places but not bad) For added strength to the 11 foot pole wall, instead of geo grid woven material where they recommend #57 limestone, i was planning to use used chainlink fence with a larger limestone rock compacted below and above the fence material, sandwiched between 2 courses (lift)of poles and laid back and on top of more compacted rock and more rock on top of that. This process would be repeated every 2 or 3 courses of poles, which would be staggered like house brick and pinned with 5/8 rebar every 3 feet. The higher the wall gets, the longer the chainlink fence would extend back into the compacted backfill. Where the poles meet end to end, they would be backed by a verticle support pole. The number 1 reason for retaining wall failure is improper drainage so all precaution would be taken to prevent water retention. Everyone knows material prices have gone thru the roof - poles still seem to be the least expensive. All commits and suggestions are welcome. Would especially like to hear from ididit.
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