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Old 02-09-2014, 04:41 PM   #1
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Need help identifying and rescuing a very distressed plant


OK I am not sure what plant this is. Bought a house and the previous owner left behind a plant still in a pot. No tag or label. The leaves are thick and have sharp edges, which lead me to believe this is in the aloe family.

This was what it looked like still in a pot, dated September 2012, 16 months ago.

We are in Miami, Florida, zone 10, rains here A LOT.



A few days later, I planted it under a tree.



It seems to do pretty well, didn't seem stressed at all.

Fast forward 12 months, Oct 2013, suddenly something shot up from the plant, almost five feet tall. I have never seen a plant where the flowers shot up so high. The leaves look a little burnt, but still healthy looking.





Now a few months later, in Feb 2014, the leaves seems wilted, color faded to yellowish. Very sad looking.







Any idea what kind of plant this is?

Any idea what I need to do to bring it back to life? Too much water? Not enough sun? Need to fertilize? Infested with bugs?
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:32 PM   #2
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I suspect it is a yucca----they need no water and full roasting sun---if it's a yucca--
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:36 PM   #3
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Edit: listen to Mike.

I found this photo of a succulent with a 5' center spike.

Need help identifying and rescuing a very distressed plant-image.jpg

Last edited by Startingover; 02-09-2014 at 06:54 PM.
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Old 02-09-2014, 07:06 PM   #4
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If you weren't located in Miami Florida, I would say it almost looks like it got frostbit a little. However, that's not likely where your located. So I would say it didn't take to well to the transplant or it doesn't like shaded areas.

Take your pictures to a local nursery and ask them the best way to nurse it back to health. They should know. Just a thought.

By the way, beautiful house and yard.
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:03 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmon View Post
If you weren't located in Miami Florida, I would say it almost looks like it got frostbit a little. However, that's not likely where your located. So I would say it didn't take to well to the transplant or it doesn't like shaded areas.

Take your pictures to a local nursery and ask them the best way to nurse it back to health. They should know. Just a thought.

By the way, beautiful house and yard.

I agree, with the frost part also. Did it not get that cold down there?
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:20 AM   #6
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January 17 it got as cold as 42F, that was the evening low.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:30 AM   #7
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They get root rot if watered to much---let it go without water---

They need full sun,too.

I have a yucca that is 25 years old here in Illinois---the center can die off and leave the off shoots--several neighbors have yuccas from this plant---I've split it several times to freshen it up--but I only have one sunny spot in the yard.
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:50 PM   #8
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Couldn't fit in a reply in this morning, for some reason, but I agree with Mike. Am in Michigan, more similar to Mike's climate than yours, and maybe there is such a thing as too much of a good thing, so wouldn't hurt to drop by a local nursery, picture in hand, but our yucca's love direct sun, and seem to really thrive in the hottest part of summer, when everything else is showing signs of lack of water. When we water the flowers around them, the yucca's get enough to rinse the dust off, that's it, and they keep growing.
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Old 02-11-2014, 10:23 AM   #9
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I've got a piece of my grandmother's yucca that she had at her farm for 50 years. It's been here 20, and I've divided it every time it sends up a daughter plant. It needs zero care at all, just full sun. Every once in a while when it gets kinda spindly, I cut it back to the ground and let it regrow. That's it. Put it in full sun, and elevate it a bit so it gets good drainage, and then ignore it.
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