Help For 50x150 Foot Sloped Back Yard With Weeds, Privet And Poison Ivy. - Landscaping & Lawn Care - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Landscaping & Lawn Care

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 08-01-2015, 05:28 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vestavia Hills, Al
Posts: 239
Rewards Points: 434
Default

Help for 50x150 foot sloped back yard with weeds, privet and poison ivy.


I have a large, sloped backyard that's bordered by a dry creekbed that serves as stormwater drainage for the city. As you can see from the photo below, I've just cleared it (a couple days of weed eating and lots of sweat).

If I leave it as is, by this time next week, it will need another couple days of weed eating and sweat to tame it for another week.

I'd like to pine straw the whole area (the places where my grass is not growing).

What are my best options to prevent weeds, privet and poison ivy from growing up through the pine straw?

I've tried round up but it doesn't seem to have an affect on any of this.

Unless I hear a better plan, I'm looking to lay a few sheets of 20x100 four mil black plastic down and then spread the pine straw over that. My concern with that approach is (1) With nothing for the straw to stick to, it will probably blow off in a few weeks or days. (2) No good water drainage other than the natural slope (which may be sufficient if I cut holes where it pools.




vestaviascott is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-01-2015, 06:54 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vestavia Hills, Al
Posts: 239
Rewards Points: 434
Default


How effective would it be to lay on pinestraw over this entire area, without a weed block or plastic? Appx 4-6 inches thick.

I'm not certain how cost effective that would be (thicker pinestraw vs thin pinestraw with a plastic underlay). I have to run the numbers on a truck delivery of pine straw sufficient to cover this area.
vestaviascott is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-01-2015, 07:48 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 1,880
Rewards Points: 1,760
Default


Instead of the poly, I would use landscaping cloth. It's not slippery and will hold on to the pinestraw better. It will last a few years if you keep it covered with the pinestraw. Some weeds will get through it though. You need to stake it at intervals with landscaping staples.

In your case you don't want roundup, you want a total vegetation killer.
ChuckF. is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-01-2015, 08:04 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Talk to the city and see if they can have a crew come through with a tractor mounted sprayer, to spray that area. You can also contact a local Weed & Feed company to spray that area to keep the Poison Ivy at bay.

Whenever you are working down in that area, always wear long sleeves, a hat and pants tucked into your socks or boots, gloves. So that it will help to keep any ticks off or keep from touching anything that may be Poison Ivy, Oak, Sumac.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2015, 08:41 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 10,279
Rewards Points: 1,558
Default


I've never understood why so many people have trouble controlling vegetative growth with round-up ( glyphosate ).

Pictured is the result of treatment with one drop of solution ( 6 0z. concentrate / gallon of water ) on one leaf at the end of each bract of a foot tall walnut tree the squirrel planted in an unwanted location. Results in a week.

I've killed walnut trees 8' tall with a 4" diameter trunk. Took about 2-3 weeks for any visible result.

Sometimes good things take a little longer.
Attached Images
   
SeniorSitizen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2015, 08:52 PM   #6
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 12,682
Rewards Points: 1,668
Blog Entries: 1
Default


One thing you can put on it to kill everything for a good while to come is salt. I put salt on things that just will not go away, but it is a year or two before anything else will grow there either.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

Lawyers believe a man is innocent until proven broke.

If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always got.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/forum.php

Jim
BigJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2015, 09:12 PM   #7
PE Mechanical Engineer
 
Thunder Chicken's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Massachusetts, USA, Zone 6A
Posts: 631
Rewards Points: 862
Default


Round-Up / glyphosate works fine on all these things - but don't expect overnight results. It might take a week or even a bit longer; in the meantime the plants will look unaffected. I forget the details but glyphosate disrupts something in plant metabolism. It has to get into the plant, screw up that metabolism, and then the plant withers and dies from that screwed up metabolism. It is not instantaneous, but it does work. Make sure to apply it on a dry day, the hotter the weather the better. Then just be patient.

After it's dead you can mulch. Landscape cloth really isn't a great product in my book - it traps organics and seeds and eventually becomes filled with weeds, and they're harder to pull because they're entangled with the fabric (which tears and rapidly becomes useless trash). I'd say if you're OK with glyphosate, just put down mulch and just spray problem spots as needed.
Thunder Chicken is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Thunder Chicken For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (08-02-2015)
Old 08-01-2015, 09:58 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vestavia Hills, Al
Posts: 239
Rewards Points: 434
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunder Chicken View Post
Round-Up / glyphosate works fine on all these things - but don't expect overnight results. It might take a week or even a bit longer; I'd say if you're OK with glyphosate, just put down mulch and just spray problem spots as needed.
Sounds good. Thanks for the help. I'll give it a few weeks and see how the glyposate does (I got the Home Depot - HDX version of Round Up - 41% glyphosate).

I'm prefer the look of pine straw over mulch.
vestaviascott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2015, 09:59 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vestavia Hills, Al
Posts: 239
Rewards Points: 434
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
One thing you can put on it to kill everything for a good while to come is salt. I put salt on things that just will not go away, but it is a year or two before anything else will grow there either.
Common table salt? Wet or dry?
vestaviascott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2015, 10:10 PM   #10
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 12,682
Rewards Points: 1,668
Blog Entries: 1
Default


Any kind of salt will work, you can get the road salt or ice cream salt cheaper than table salt. You will want to wet it down or just make up a heavy brine.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

Lawyers believe a man is innocent until proven broke.

If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always got.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/forum.php

Jim
BigJim is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to BigJim For This Useful Post:
gregzoll (08-02-2015)
Old 08-02-2015, 01:16 AM   #11
PE Mechanical Engineer
 
Thunder Chicken's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Massachusetts, USA, Zone 6A
Posts: 631
Rewards Points: 862
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by vestaviascott View Post
Sounds good. Thanks for the help. I'll give it a few weeks and see how the glyposate does (I got the Home Depot - HDX version of Round Up - 41% glyphosate).
Make sure to mix it with water per the instructions. The plant needs to absorb this solution through the leaves so the concentration needs to be right. Stronger isn't necessesarily better.
Thunder Chicken is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Thunder Chicken For This Useful Post:
gregzoll (08-02-2015), oh'mike (08-02-2015)
Old 08-04-2015, 11:09 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 4,640
Rewards Points: 4,434
Default


Maybe..

http://www.scotts.com/smg/goART2/con...grass/33800016

Zoysia is a warm-season, perennial, turf-type grass that spreads by stolons and rhizomes. Its dense turf is characterized by stiff leaf blades. Zoysia exhibits exceptional wear tolerance, good drought tolerance and moderate shade tolerance. Zoysia has a low-water and nutrition requirement. Once fully established, it resists weeds well due to its dense growth pattern. Zoysia does turn brown after the first hard frost but resumes growth as soil temperatures return to 70˚F. Note: Zoysia turns dormant earlier in the winter than other warm-season grasses and may remain brown longer. Other zoysia characteristics to note include:

Daily Sunlight Required: Adaptable to full sun to partial shade (six to eight hours of sunlight)

Sun Tolerance: Excellent

Shade Tolerance: Moderate

Grass Color: Dark green in season, tan/brown when dormant

Grass Texture: Medium

Drought Tolerance: Good

Disease Resistance: Good

Traffic Tolerance: Exceptional

USDA Planting Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (may not be adaptable to all areas within each climatic zone). Find your USDA Zone.

Recommended Planting Dates: Mid- to late spring after the last frost or early fall, depending on your specific location

Average Germination: 14 to 21 Days

Mowing Height: 1.0 to 2.5 Inches
ron45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 11:14 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 4,640
Rewards Points: 4,434
Default


If that doesn't work build yourself a heavy screen sled and pull it with the jeep.
ron45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 12:25 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vestavia Hills, Al
Posts: 239
Rewards Points: 434
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by ron45 View Post
If that doesn't work build yourself a heavy screen sled and pull it with the jeep.
What's the purpose of a heavy screen sled?
vestaviascott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2015, 12:47 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 4,640
Rewards Points: 4,434
Default


It's like this but home made...

ron45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts