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Old 12-11-2014, 05:32 PM   #1
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Arboreous Menace


Few months ago I bought a foreclosure home whose previous owner seemed to have neglected garden maintenance, so there are trees, plants, and bushes growing in which, at first, seemed undesirable spots: besides the house, and under/besides/through the fence (it seems that the plants really like to grow near the fence). I don't know much about plants, and since I have so many of them around (including a dead fallen tree) I don't know which one would be usable as log for a chminey fire. Anyhow, below are some pics depicting the situation:







Could it be they were planted on purpose for any reason?

I was wondering if simply using chainsaw to carefully cut the plants would do it. Any suggestions, ideas, insights would be appreciated.
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Old 12-11-2014, 06:29 PM   #2
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Yes they were planted for a reason. A bird wanted those trees there for future generations. In a way they may be more intelligent than humans.

Those trees that grow close to structures, that we see as an aggravation, were mostly planted by a birds. Well, good grief, how would a bird brain do that and to think he fertilized it so that little tree gets off to a good start.

Actually it's real simple being all he has to do is poop on the roof and a rain eventually washes it down to the dirt with a seed contained within. In dry climates that little sapling usually does very well by getting more of its share of rainfall being just under the eaves.

Those unwanted trees that seem to line the fence rows came about in a similar manner but with just a little less water.

To burn well, I like to have the the moisture about 15 percent and anything larger than my wrist is fair game in my wood stove.

Bypass loppers work well on green limbs about quarter to 50 cent size and smaller. Dry oak limbs ( hardwoods ) will ruin bypass loppers. A sawsall on those a little larger and a chain saw for larger.

Last edited by SeniorSitizen; 12-11-2014 at 06:37 PM.
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Old 12-11-2014, 07:11 PM   #3
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Ayuh,.... Those are weed trees, they grow next to the house, 'n along the fence to avoid a lawnmower,...
They tear up houses, 'n ruin fences,...

Cut 'em up into stove sized pieces, 'n use 'em to keep warm this winter, or for a campfire, 'n march mellows next summer,....
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Old 12-11-2014, 08:58 PM   #4
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I think cutting them down is a good idea. I would definitely use a reciprocating saw (sawzall) http://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Har...s/N-5yc1vZc2h7

I can't tell what type of trees those are, but you probably have to dig up some of the roots too if you want the lawn to be flat and soft. That's not much fun.

After cutting down the trees, raking the lawn, and reseeding the grass, I think your lawn will look amazing.
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Old 12-16-2014, 02:55 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
Yes they were planted for a reason. A bird wanted those trees there for future generations. In a way they may be more intelligent than humans.

Those trees that grow close to structures, that we see as an aggravation, were mostly planted by a birds. Well, good grief, how would a bird brain do that and to think he fertilized it so that little tree gets off to a good start.

Actually it's real simple being all he has to do is poop on the roof and a rain eventually washes it down to the dirt with a seed contained within. In dry climates that little sapling usually does very well by getting more of its share of rainfall being just under the eaves.

Those unwanted trees that seem to line the fence rows came about in a similar manner but with just a little less water.

To burn well, I like to have the the moisture about 15 percent and anything larger than my wrist is fair game in my wood stove.

Bypass loppers work well on green limbs about quarter to 50 cent size and smaller. Dry oak limbs ( hardwoods ) will ruin bypass loppers. A sawsall on those a little larger and a chain saw for larger.
Those birds are terrible pollinator agents from the point of view of the human habitats and structures. I will plan on lay concrete blocks in such areas and the perimeter of the house. Some of the plants and trees simply grew through and enveloped the fences, making it difficult and labourious to remove them.

So, I am assuming that it is fair game saw, cut, and chop all of them and utilize them in fireplace or wood furnace? No unpleasant smells, and the sorts... At least, it pays off somewhat for having to upkeep such a large property plus the workload of removing the bushes and trees with a lesser heating bill.

I am mostly using my chainsaw on everything (a small 2-stroke Poulan P3314), but the chainsaw is not cooperating... I will try a new spark plug, since this one seems fouled anyway.

Below are some of the bushes and trees removed that I will try on my future wood stove:





But this one by the looks and serenity, I assume, was planted by a human on purpose?



Thanks a lot for your comments!
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Old 12-16-2014, 02:57 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
Ayuh,.... Those are weed trees, they grow next to the house, 'n along the fence to avoid a lawnmower,...
They tear up houses, 'n ruin fences,...

Cut 'em up into stove sized pieces, 'n use 'em to keep warm this winter, or for a campfire, 'n march mellows next summer,....
Yeah, they pose a threat, and I am worried about how to properly remove them. I am not sure if simply cutting them and leaving a stub would eliminate at least most of them.
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Old 12-16-2014, 02:59 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by LeakyHawaiiRoof View Post
I think cutting them down is a good idea. I would definitely use a reciprocating saw (sawzall) http://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Har...s/N-5yc1vZc2h7

I can't tell what type of trees those are, but you probably have to dig up some of the roots too if you want the lawn to be flat and soft. That's not much fun.

After cutting down the trees, raking the lawn, and reseeding the grass, I think your lawn will look amazing.
Yep, a reciprocating saw may do the trick for that growing through the fences. Thanks, I will reseeding them soon!
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Old 12-16-2014, 03:48 PM   #8
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Yeah, they pose a threat, and I am worried about how to properly remove them. I am not sure if simply cutting them and leaving a stub would eliminate at least most of them.
Ayuh,.... Cut 'em off, 'n spray the stubs with Round-up, or Diesel fuel, or Clorox,...
Clorox is probably the Best, 'n no doubt the cheapest,...

The Evergreen, looks to be an over-grown cedar hedge,....
If ya like the wind break, or privacy it provides, just trim it off, inside, just so's it ain't touchin' the buildin', when the wind blows,...
Otherwise, cut it down, if ya want,...

The wood will make for a Cheery fire, but it ain't big enough for an All night'er,...

Dono how big yer property is, but I agree, a Chainsaw beats a sawzall every day of the week,...
I've got 3 or 4 of 'em,...
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Old 01-04-2015, 04:06 PM   #9
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All in all the property has about 1 acre (.96 of an acre). Any chance one could reach heating fuel independence (with a wood furnace) with this size property?

Yep, you mean Clorox as in bleach (or concentrated bleach)? Maybe pouring concentrated bleach in the base of the tree/bush would kill it.

Last but not least, I was wondering if those should be candidates to destruction too:



thks!
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Old 01-04-2015, 05:05 PM   #10
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Last but not least those two would come out - lock stock and barrel - if they were at my house. How long since you heard that phrase. Another option is to cut back to dirt level each winter.
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Old 01-04-2015, 06:14 PM   #11
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Last but not least those two would come out - lock stock and barrel - if they were at my house. How long since you heard that phrase. Another option is to cut back to dirt level each winter.
"Lock, stock, and barrel", I have to look this one up! I just added it to my vocabulary repertoire. So, they must be obliterated too. Does it look like they were planted by humans, or were they another byproduct of bird pollination?
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Old 01-04-2015, 10:12 PM   #12
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Does it look like they were planted by humans, or were they another byproduct of bird pollination?
Could have been planted by either because there are plenty of humans that don't seem to know better than to plant that close to a structure.
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