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Old 05-28-2014, 05:06 AM   #1
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Water damaged shower


Ok so the caulking around my tub has been cracked for about a year and a half, maybe longer... I started removing the caulking because I noticed there were a few tiles separating from the wall. The caulking is gone, and some tiles came off with it. On top of that, the thinset behind the fallen tiles is like sand... Do I just remove the old "thinset" and re tile those couple tiles? Any tricks of the trade I should know about? Thanks in advance.

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Old 05-28-2014, 08:08 AM   #2
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What is the tile laid on? Cement board, foam or drywall? If it's drywall then you're screwed. You'll have to re-tile. Lot of half-ass jobs get done by putting tile straight onto drywall and it never lasts.

That you left the caulking in bad shape for FAR TOO LONG didn't help matters.

If it's not drywall then how did water get behind there? Bottom caulk alone wouldn't necessarily explain the failure. Failed caulk above, around the other fixtures might have allowed more water to get down into wall from above where found the failed tiles.
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Old 05-28-2014, 01:56 PM   #3
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You have more extensive damage than you know. Answer the above queries and we can go from there.
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Old 05-29-2014, 07:59 PM   #4
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The tile WAS laid on some really old kind of cement board. It crumbled in my hands when I touched it. So I took a drywall taping knife and removed the section where the tiles fell off. Behind the old cement backer is cinderblock. I was wondering if I could just get a small piece of wonderboard and retile that section? Would I use liquid nails to attach the wonderboard to the cinderblock?

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Old 05-29-2014, 08:10 PM   #5
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The tile WAS laid on some really old kind of cement board. It crumbled in my hands when I touched it. So I took a drywall taping knife and removed the section where the tiles fell off. Behind the old cement backer is cinderblock. I was wondering if I could just get a small piece of wonderboard and retile that section? Would I use liquid nails to attach the wonderboard to the cinderblock?

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I suppose in a half-baked way you could do that. It is safe to assume that the same type of damage extends well beyond what you have exposed and propose to fix for now. That's your call. I suspect what you have crumbling out of there is probably an old stucco-base sheet product if it was grey and powdery. Sure you could cut a piece of cement board and re-fashion a repair. Attaching the cement board to the cinder block is going to be a questionable event with no guarantees of success.

Liquid Nails wouldn't be my product of choice. I think I would use retaining wall adhesive intended for use to stack concrete retaining wall blocks.

When this fails just remember: You have been warned.
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Old 05-29-2014, 09:39 PM   #6
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When this fails just remember: You have been warned.
What then would you suggest???

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Old 05-30-2014, 09:04 AM   #7
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Update your profile to indicate some sort of location. Because location will affect recommendations on how to deal with the wall.

Prepare yourself, there are potentially other issues looming behind that wall. As in, moisture from outside contributed to the failure of that board. And it's not just that one section.

That and if your house is one based on the plan as others in the neighborhood then consider talking to those homeowners about what issues they've dealt with regarding this bath setup. But if this was a job not done during the initial construction then all bets are off. Then it becomes a bug hunt trying to figure out what was done (and how well/poorly).

Short term a patch with similar thickness cement board and the wall adhesive would certainly be 'less worse' than doing nothing. But me, I'd really want to know what's going on. That might be opening a real rats nest of complications. How ready are you to replace that interior wall?
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Old 05-30-2014, 10:41 AM   #8
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I live in an apartment complex owned by my family in southeast Idaho. The shower is on an outside wall...

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Old 05-30-2014, 06:54 PM   #9
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picture will help us help you....but prepare to gut it out
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Old 05-30-2014, 10:01 PM   #10
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Before

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Old 05-30-2014, 10:02 PM   #11
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After I removed the backer

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Old 05-30-2014, 10:06 PM   #12
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You think that is concrete block there?
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Old 05-31-2014, 01:46 AM   #13
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You think that is concrete block there?
Not sure why you're berating the OP. It looks like concrete wall to me. Whether that be concrete block, cinder block, or a monolithic concrete wall doesn't really matter.
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Old 05-31-2014, 08:36 AM   #14
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I'm not berating anyone. I've just never seen concrete block overhanging a tub lip.

Tell us more about the place. Are the walls solid masonry, like a 8" concrete block wall with stucco on the outside or a brick veneer?

I'm not sure why anyone would put wall board on top of a concrete block wall and not just tile directly on the concrete block.
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Old 05-31-2014, 04:13 PM   #15
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I'm not berating anyone. I've just never seen concrete block overhanging a tub lip.

Tell us more about the place. Are the walls solid masonry, like a 8" concrete block wall with stucco on the outside or a brick veneer?

I'm not sure why anyone would put wall board on top of a concrete block wall and not just tile directly on the concrete block.
Wallboard is often fastened to a block wall so as to have a suitable plane for the tile installation. Otherwise the individual block faces are irregular no matter how flat the wall looks and tiling directly over a block substrate creates tile-lippage that no one wants to deal with. Done it many many times.
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