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Old 03-25-2014, 04:19 PM   #1
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Is this wall structural - plans included


My house is approx. 24ft x 32ft and consists of a basement, main floor and hip roof. Downstairs, there is a beam that runs directly down the middle of the house with 12ft floor joist spans on either side of it which overlap and rest on the beam.

On the main floor, there is a load bearing wall that runs directly on top of the beam below which supports the roof. The roof rafters appear to be the same as the floor joists - 12ft spans on either side which meet and overlap, resting on the supporting wall and transferring the roof weight on to the beam below.

The structural wall upstairs forms one side of a hallway. The hallway is approx. 3 feet wide. One of side of the wall is a living room - with all 12 feet open with no other support below. The other side consists of the kitchen which is 9 feet, then the roof rafters meet the other side of the hallway, followed by another 3 feet (hallway width) to make the 12 feet.

The only structural wall on the main floor should be the one that runs directly down the middle of the house, on top of the basement beam - is this correct?

My question evolves around confirming that the opposing side of the hallway is not load bearing. In the plans, the section highlighted in green is the wall in question. The main structural wall is having a section removed and an LVL beam will go in its place. Does the kitchen section need a beam, or can it just be opened up as the plans show?
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Is this wall structural - plans included-photo-2.jpg   Is this wall structural - plans included-photo-3.jpg  

Last edited by Zif0684; 03-25-2014 at 04:25 PM.
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Old 03-25-2014, 04:50 PM   #2
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If the ceiling joists (with attic above) meet on the center wall; you need a beam. If the rafters have purlins and struts bearing on that wall; you need a beam. If there is a dormer/knee wall up there and the studs bear on the ceiling joists on that wall; you need a beam. If there is an attic stair opening that bear on that wall; you need a beam.


From; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...9_8_par027.htm

R502.6.1 Floor systems. Joists framing from opposite sides over a bearing support shall lap a minimum of 3 inches (76 mm) and shall be nailed together with a minimum three 10d face nails. A wood or metal splice with strength equal to or greater than that provided by the nailed lap is permitted. From; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...9_5_par026.htmYou are now making a new load-bearing wall in the middle of span which joists below may not be designed for, check AHJ.
If the house is designed for a high-wind area and you add a beam, you may need to structurally shear (plywood) another connecting portion of same wall against lateral forces - shear ties/metal straps, etc. (consult a S.E. or local AHJ). IF not, the prescriptive codes may work, remember to carry the jack stud loads down to center beam through solid blocking in floor below; http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic...9_5_par024.htm

Gary
PS. All structural changes (as this one) require a permit...especially at selling time and satisfy your HO Insurance carrier if ever a claim.
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Last edited by Gary in WA; 03-25-2014 at 04:55 PM.
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Old 03-25-2014, 04:58 PM   #3
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Still looking for clarification if based on my drawings, the small section of the kitchen wall is bearing any weight. There are no struts or knee walls above it in the attic. The ceiling rafters overlap on the hallway wall that I have already identified as being load bearing and needing a beam.

Last edited by Zif0684; 03-25-2014 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 03-25-2014, 07:22 PM   #4
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is the roof stick framed or trusses
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:04 PM   #5
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Stick frame
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:13 PM   #6
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Then it needs a beam. It's load bearing as already mentioned several times.
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:24 PM   #7
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No Joe, the only person who has mentioned load bearing is me. Did anyone actually READ my post or look at the sketch? The main load barring wall in the house is across the hallway from the kitchen section in question. Why would one side (above living room) span 12 feet, and the other spans 9 before the roof rafters hit the kitchen partition? I assume it's 12 and 12, not 12 feet on one side and 9+3 on the other...
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:30 PM   #8
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There is no need to assume anything. You need to do a little invasive surgery to see if there are any joists above the wall that are being supported by the wall, or any other structural elements bearing on the wall. You may need to drill a few small holes in the ceiling and use a flexible camera to scope it out, or you may be able to see from above. No one on the internet can see this for you, and certainly you do not want to take a public opinion poll on whether you have a structural wall or not.
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Old 03-25-2014, 09:02 PM   #9
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Then what is the first photo that shows the wall at 12' noted as "2x4 wall to be removed" ?

OK, I think I see, you plan on removing part of both. The first photo is clear. The second is rather hard to read.

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Old 03-25-2014, 09:05 PM   #10
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That's the potion of the structural wall that is coming out and being replaced with an LVL beam. My question is about the wall on the opposing side of the hallway from that bearing wall, highlighted in green on the floor plan.
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Old 03-25-2014, 09:43 PM   #11
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If there is continuous ceiling joists over the wall and nothing in the attic connecting rafters to ceiling joists it is not load bearing.
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