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Old 05-26-2015, 01:04 PM   #1
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Sill plate overhangs foundation


Greetings, this is my first post, so I hope it is in the correct category and uses the proper etiquette. I have a 20 year, 2-story house with basement that has engineered floor joists. I recently tore out the front stoop because it was done poorly, and the rim joist was rotted out. The 'sill plate' is actually a piece of pressure treated 2x, then 2 more pieces of non-pressure treated 2x's, then a piece of plywood. It's not this way in the back of the house so I am assuming the poured foundation walls are not level from front to back. The non-pressure treated pieces of the sill plate complex also need to be replaced. What I noticed after removing the stoop is that the pressure treated portion of the sill plate that is not rotted goes from being flush with the exterior of the foundation wall to about 1.25 inches of overhang to the outside in about a 6 or 7 foot span. I'm not sure if it was always this way or if something (the wall, the sill plate or both) has moved over the years. Any advice or concerns? Also, the rim joist is plywood and over an inch thick - is that standard and where can I find plywood like that?
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Old 05-26-2015, 02:47 PM   #2
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Post some pictures.
Sounds like an engineered rim joist, any real lumber yard should have them.
Not a box store.
No water proofing on the wall before the stoop was done?
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Old 05-27-2015, 07:32 AM   #3
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Thanks Joe! I'll take some pictures tonight and post them. I have a couple of good lumber places nearby, so I'll check them for the engineered rim joist. And, no, it appears there was no waterproofing done prior to the stoop installation. When we purchased the house, there was a crack where the stoop meets the house the length of the stoop, and water had been getting in for who knows how long. I didn't discover it until we had been in the house for over a year. The rim joist is completely rotted away at one point - roughly a square foot of it. I want to do whatever is best practice to waterproof and prep the area before the stone guy comes and pours a new stoop for us. Furthermore, it appears the previous home owner did not pour a footer and put the concrete blocks directly on the ground. It created a weird bowl shape to the stoop from left to right and gave it the illusion that the stone was bent or warped.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:53 AM   #4
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The sill plate problem needs to be inspected. Go to your town building office and ask for local engineer or recommendations.
Sill plate is held down by bolts as well as by the joists and all I can think of is some serious problem for the plate to move. It is possible that foundation was poured out of square and the problem was covered over with the framing. This may involve removing some drywall. Everything must be looked at, including the foundation and to the rafters. Initially, it will be checking to see everything is straight.

If you're set on replacing the rim, find treated rim. Regular lumber can be trimmed for small lengths, which may be faster. Use dry lumber, if used. I wouldn't remove any section of the rim for 1 square foot hole. Above the rim should be another plate for the wall that can span one joist bay. Remove the rotted fibers, cover with sheetmetal, cover from inside with ply - if you want - and resume rebuilding. Use multiple layers of flashing and pans for doors, etc. Use flashing that will not corrode away. Galvy sheet metal will corrode quickly. Heavier duty aluminum sheets are better with masonary but not with treated lumber.
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