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Old 06-03-2015, 10:56 PM   #1
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Remodeling but found mold.


Potentially buying a home and would remodel basement but could see mold visible on top of the carpet and drywall. This is in a basement bedroom (12x12) on top of concrete and I believe there is an under layment but can't be sure. Prior to putting an offset in, we are concerned about the air quality, the total area affected, and the cost of paying someone to inspect and correct. I will handle the demo and the build out once it is fixed. Is there any special way to get rid of infected debit? What are the costs of hiring someone? What could the reason be for the mold/water? Could someone advise please.
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Old 06-03-2015, 10:59 PM   #2
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Photo of situation. Is it worth purchasing home with this condition?
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Remodeling but found mold.-fullsizerender_1433390311308.jpg  
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Old 06-04-2015, 04:35 AM   #3
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I would expect to find a foundation crack when that is opened up---look at the outside of the house--see if there is a crack visable---

Cost will be hard to guess until the drywall is removed----
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:05 AM   #4
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Costs are always hard to tell without opening the walls to see what you find inside.Is the basement humid?Does the sump run all the time?Is water directed away from the footings?Of course you need to fix the water issue before I would do anything inside.With that said it depends on how much money and what kind of experience you have to fix the problem in my option.
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Old 06-04-2015, 12:10 PM   #5
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The issue is directly below a concrete pad next to the garage so there isn't necessarily a slope or visable defects but it has water falling close to this location from a gutter system. There are concerns about the foundation being cracked and I have not dealt with cracks previously so I am not sure how easy this would be to repair. I have previously excavated the earthwork next to a previous house and done a dimpled drainage system over a CMU wall.

If the foundation wall has a crack, what are options to fix it?

If the foundation is sinking causing the crack, what are the options to fix it?

I am going back into the house later today and will be inspecting more and will look at the sump pump and the humidity down in this room. Any advise is greatly appreciated.
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Old 06-04-2015, 01:36 PM   #6
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How bad is the crack, is the wall bowing in? Did it look like it was repaired in the past?What will it cost to make the repairs?Food for thought, if the home owner really wants to sell they may actually split the cost of the repairs.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:49 PM   #7
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There are crack injection companies--they will pump epoxy into the crack under high pressure--very good success rate---most will return if the injection fails---

(look under 'basement waterproofing')
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:55 PM   #8
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I've seen a few driveway slabs directing the water from a roof downspout back under the apron. This would saturate the inside garage slab or funnel water to the least compacted or most excavated (for column footing) soil, settling down along the concrete wall. Get some local estimates or pass on the sale if unsure. tap the floor with a hard object to check for bounce-back (underlayment) or not.

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Old 06-06-2015, 12:32 PM   #9
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Just saying most basement moisture problems are best fixed from the outside. Personally I would pass on this house if you want to finish the basement . Fixing the issue unless it simply redirecting the surface water is not likely a do it yourself project and may require excavation and considerable expense . If I were buying I would have the seller at least remediate the mold and remove the damage items as a condition of sale.
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Old 06-18-2015, 01:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
There are crack injection companies--they will pump epoxy into the crack under high pressure--very good success rate---most will return if the injection fails---

(look under 'basement waterproofing')
My inlaws had a crack fixed in this fashion and two years later it is all good still - no leaks. Couldn't tell you the cost but it couldn't have been much because it wasn't worth filing a claim with the insurance company, made more sense just to pay the "crack guy".

If this is a home you are purchasing, only you can decide if it still worth it. Is the rest of the home solid and how much do like it? If you can pinpoint how water is entering the home, and if you know what is needed to address the leak, then ripping out and replacing the drywall/carpet is relatively inexpensive especially if you can handle it yourself. You can always come up with a "worst case scenario" number for how much it might cost for the whole repair, and negotiate it into your offer.
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Old 06-30-2015, 11:31 PM   #11
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Put in an offer, go to lawyer review and an inspection. Negotiate for at least $5000. If the rest of the house is a good deal, you will have to put more money in for having a house. The photo shows a problem, but at least half the problem is from using wrong materials in the basement.
Your lawyer has his own inspector. Do not work with agent recommended inspector.
Be ready to walk away.
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:11 AM   #12
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I'll say this: expect the unexpected if you go through with the purchase. I was in the same boat just over a month ago. My first home purchase was a total nightmare from the very beginning to the day of the closing but that's another story.

We bought our house just over a month ago. Our inspector (agent recommended) was done in March and we didn't close till June (yeah...). This was a first mistake. I knew better but faulted. Told the wife I wasn't happy with the inspection (seemed to general, etc) as soon as the guy left. He told me everything I already knew about the place. I was going to call up my HUD inspector but decided against it- thinking all will be well.

My main concerns with any house we looked at were: structural, foundation damage, mold, etc. The big major wallet sucking issues- the very issues that would have me walk away.

The house we bought is a half raised ranch... 1800 sq ft, etc... the house wasn't remodeled to sell like some are to hide issues. In one corner of the basement, near a fake fireplace build (to hide the sum pump) were visible spots of mold. The PVC pipe coming out the house wasn't properly sealed and we figured that was most likely the case.

Once we got the place we began to remodel. When I started to tackle the 'little' mold problem i.e pulling away the trim- I noticed more mold behind the trim. Needles to say mold was pretty much through out the entire basement behind the trim. Now, I'm going from a finished basement to an a unfinished basement, some of the 2x4 have to be replaced as well. An entire redo.

We came to find out from our neighbor that this house had a foundation crack in the 80's which was fixed but wasn't in our disclosure. When I began sealing the gap between the patio and house and worked my way toward the driveway an entire new problem arose. I came to find out this driveway began to sink toward the house. In the very center it sunk 12" and this was hidden by laying down multiple layers of asphalt throughout the years. The only way to fix this issue is to excavate and redo the entire driveway....$$$$

Moral of the story: mold in one corner of the basement mostly likely but not always means mold elsewhere. You can have a nice finished basement with mold brewing behind the walls- but you never know until you look.

If you're not sure/uncertain pass it up if you don't mind putting in extra time/money into the place.

Last edited by RomeovilleDad; 07-29-2015 at 01:15 AM.
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Old 07-30-2015, 05:31 AM   #13
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Additionally, as it seems not many have addressed the aftermath of fixing the water leakage issue, mold remediation can be costly. My family has had it taken care of in a few different apartment buildings we have purchased and for the most part, it's been painless except for the cost. Because of the location and depending on how long the problem has persisted, you can expect that it could look small on the outside but blossom into a whole new level of frustration. Or it could just be that one small area. The photo you posted has the contrast really cranked up- it's hard to tell. Is that carpet? Or construction debris? It almost looks like the scrapings of the popcorn ceiling we are removing in an apartment unit right now...

Also- if there was this issue there, in the basement, I would be cautious if you continue through with the purchase in regards to the quality of build of the rest of the home. Check the job done on all the finish trim work, see if they skimped there and had major cracks that appear to be filled with caulking or other compounds. That could indicate they hired people who weren't as competent. Or it could just indicate that they didn't care. Check all the insides that you can. Usually- if you look at something and say, that kinda looks funny... There's a good reason (or a very bad reason) it might look that way..

Edit:
Also- Make sure when the leak is fixed and all is said and done to verify humidity levels and that there is good ventilation everywhere. If there isn't- then you're looking at additional costs to make it right.
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