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Old 11-13-2013, 02:33 PM   #1
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Reach in closet


Hello,
In my 60's side-split I have a reach in closet with bi-fold doors in one of the bedrooms. The doors are about 1 foot shorter and 4 feet smaller than the closet itself. Has anyone here ever opened up the opening to the full size of the closet and installed sliding doors instead? How big of a job would it be?
Thanks,

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Old 11-13-2013, 02:39 PM   #2
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Got a picture?
Sliding doors is not the answer, do that and you'll cut down the opening size by 50%.
Why not reframe for larger bi-folds?
What size are the one's that are there now?
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Old 11-13-2013, 03:19 PM   #3
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Some pictures:







I agree is would give me less access one side at a time, but it should give me better access to half the closet at any time. Should it not also give me more space in the room?
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Old 11-13-2013, 03:29 PM   #4
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Close ups do no good.
Please back up and try and take a picture of that whole wall.
Still no idea how wide the inside the closet is and how wide the doors are.
Hate the look of flat panel doors of any type. A louvered door would look so much better.
Not sure what good more height is going to do you with a shelf that height.
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Old 11-13-2013, 11:15 PM   #5
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You could open it up a bit and change from bi-folds to sliders. As to how much work...I would remove the doors and the wall, reframe the opening to fit your new doors, patch and match your flooring, drywall, mud, prime, paint, finish work, prep, hang and finish your doors.
Is it a lot of work? That depends on you and your skill level.
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Old 11-17-2013, 12:59 PM   #6
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i agree with dave with one addition checking to see if it is load bearing for correct header
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Old 07-23-2014, 06:14 PM   #7
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Okay, sorry to revive a dead thread, but I am finally moving forward with this after putting several other things ahead of it. I confirmed that this wall is not load bearing. The roof girders run in the direction of wall.

I'm running into a bit of a hitch though. This is what it looks like when I pulled the jambs off:








The wall is thicker than I expected. It's a standard 2x4, but it's flanked by 3/4" wood. The drywall is flush with the wood on both sides. Does this mean I have 3/4" drywall all over? Why would this wood be there at all and not just drywall to the door jamb edge?

My next question, do you think it's possible to simply open the wall up to the width I want, and extend the jamb somehow? That way I only need to extend the jam, put new jack studs in, then cut away the old stuff? This could save me a bunch of drywall and framing work.
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:40 PM   #8
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That rough cut 3/4" is usually used as a plaster screed board---I think you have plaster walls---

Still--peal off the plaster and rebuild the wall the way you want it---and then use drywall---I don't see that as a big issue--
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:45 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
That rough cut 3/4" is usually used as a plaster screed board---I think you have plaster walls---

Still--peal off the plaster and rebuild the wall the way you want it---and then use drywall---I don't see that as a big issue--
Thanks Oh'Mike. My house seems to have a bunch of 'small' drywall panels. I can actually see this in the basement and i can see it because many of the joints have show valleys. Would I get 3/4" drywall to replace this so my wall is even?

What are your thoughts on the header? Can it be spliced?
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Old 07-24-2014, 01:15 PM   #10
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That small drywall is actually gypsum lath for plaster. As to the header--do not splice it--you want a single piece.

I would shim out the studs so the new drywall matches the old plaster.
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Old 07-24-2014, 02:06 PM   #11
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Thanks oh'mike. This now makes perfect sense to me. I'll open it up and build a proper header then tie back in.

Any recommendations for the following?

What's the best way to cut the drywall away form the ceiling as not to damage the ceiling?

What material is the easiest to get my hands on to shim out the studs? It seems like I will need 1/4" nominal thickness?

Regarding the floor: Because the floor will have a track, and it's a reach in closet I was thinking about just bridging the gap with a transition 5"+ wide transition along the full length. I would just leave the floor in place underneath and block up where I cut the wall away. Any ideas one the best way to make a transition? I was thinking I could get a 1/2" piece of oak and just router a nice edge on. I'm not sure where to get the material though.
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Old 07-24-2014, 02:30 PM   #12
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If you need exactly 1" on the wall face I would use a piece of 1/2" drywall with a piece of 1/2" over it.Cheaper and will give you your 1".Stagger the joints on the two layers.If you have a table saw you can get a oak board at the lumber yard or big box store and run it thru the saw on edge with the blade set at about 15 degrees.
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Old 07-24-2014, 05:43 PM   #13
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If you need 1/4"--look for wood plaster lath---they sell it at the Home Depot--or rip some strips of 1/4" plywood---I'll bet you can find a damaged sheet in the mark down rack---1/4" can be scored with a utility knife and snapped---so no table saw needed.

To cleanly remove the drywall---score the corners with a utility knife--deep--several passes---(I assume you have limited power tools)
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Old 07-24-2014, 10:12 PM   #14
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Great ideas Mike.

What power tool would be good for cutting the drywall?

I have many more tools than my amateur questions would have you believe.
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