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Old 08-15-2015, 09:07 PM   #1
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Old addition remodel


Hello, my name is Jason and i recently inherited the property i grew up on as a child, it used to have an older house on it with an addition that was built by my dad in the 80's. The old house eventually rotted and fell but the addition is still there. The addition has a concrete slab that is so close to the addition, that rain water bounced off the concrete and rotted the rim joist on 2 walls and bottom plate of one wall. The roof had a 24" roof over hang with very little support and over the years it is sagging. What i am wanting to do is remodel this addition into a cabin for vacation or permanent living.

The last picture shows the worst spot

Do i need to start on the roof or the rim joist/ wall plate first ??
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Old addition remodel-img_3774.jpg   Old addition remodel-img_3777.jpg   Old addition remodel-img_3776.jpg  
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Old 08-16-2015, 08:52 AM   #2
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Not trying to be rude just honest. I would start by tearing the whole mess down and starting over. That structure doesn't even have a proper foundation of any kind under it. You will spend way more time and money trying to fix that mess than it would take to just build something new. I don't see anything in those pictures that is worth salvaging except possibly some building materials. From what I can see in those pictures it wasn't built properly in the first place and you are seeing the results of that improper work.
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Old 08-16-2015, 09:08 AM   #3
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Agree with above, demo it.
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Old 08-16-2015, 10:49 AM   #4
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I did not ask if it was worth it or should i , i asked where to start.


Not everyone has the luxury or the money to just tear something down and start over. The foundation may not be proper in your part of the world but here it is VERY common on older houses. It may not be built proper for today's standards but being it has stood for 35 years and through every hurricane that hit us since 1980 i'm not ready to write it off yet. I said i grew up here so obviously it has sentimental value. i seriously doubt you could build a new version of this cheaper than you could fix it
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Old 08-16-2015, 11:16 AM   #5
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I would check with the local building permit people to insure the will give you a building permit for what you propose. Don't invest time and money only to find out you can not get an occupancy permit.

Many older properties had shallow wells that no longer meet code and the same for septic systems.
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Old 08-16-2015, 02:31 PM   #6
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I would start with a complete observation.
I wouldn't be concerned about the block, it can be reset or replaced with other material easily.
A total inspection of the floor joist is most important, would need pictures.
Then the walls. Pictures
Then the roof. Pictures

Keep in mind, there comes a time when no matter how much money you throw at something it can't be saved.
If this proves to be the case here, I would take pictures of everything and build a new one just like it. You can save what materials are good and use them in the new construction. This is done all the time for sentimental reason or to preserve a certain look or atmosphere and sometimes it's cheaper.

Just remember people here are willing to help.
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Old 08-16-2015, 02:53 PM   #7
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Where is this building located? I'm thinking, not in a state with very cold weather.
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Old 08-16-2015, 02:54 PM   #8
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I assume that there are no codes in your area, and no permit is required. Based on those assumptions, I would start by restoring the sills (you refer to them as rim joists, but presumably there are sills). If the foundation is out of level, you should start by adjusting the block to make the base level all the way around. After the foundation is set, you can work on the walls, replace rotten lumber as needed. Then you can work on the top plate of the walls, replace or strengthen as needed. Replace damaged or undersized joists on the first floor, and then replace as needed damaged attic joists. Then replace damaged rafters as needed, and at the same time you can replace the roof.

Other areas worth checking is the drainage for the house, electrical system, plumbing, septic system. They may be fine, they may need work.
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Old 08-16-2015, 09:37 PM   #9
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Thank you, it just gets aggravating when someone says just tear it down right off of the bat !! It is located close to the Alabama/Florida line northwest florida. I looked under it and the floor joists under the building are dry and in good shape, i peaked into the attic and the trusses look good but are weathered at the ends and the same with the plywood sheathing on top of the trusses good but starting to get weathered on the edges. When i do the roof i plan on cutting the shingles and plywood back even with the wall and letting my 2x4 that the tin will screw to hang over 16". I can get more pictures this coming weekend.The Thank you again
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Old 08-16-2015, 10:11 PM   #10
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I wouldn't use tin for the roof, unless your catching water. Tin gets very hot.

You must start with the foundation and floor/joist, or risk damaging what you do above when jacking and leveling. Do you have any trailer parks where you are, if so, they have someone very knowledgeable do their leveling. This is very dangerous work and can be life threatening when it comes to old structures.

You must inspect everything and take pictures to look over in case you have missed something. You cannot just peak or look at it from a distance and say it's okay.

If you are not willing to inspect and take safety precautions then I'm not willing to help.
YES, IT'S THAT IMPORTANT......
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