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Old 05-21-2013, 12:44 PM   #1
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DRICORE....good/bad?


Hello,

I am looking to refinish my little more then half my basement which is around 600 sqf. I do have a subpump that has never turn. The bucket where the subpump is alwas dry also(have had the house for 2 years). This doesn't mean i will not get water. So far i have waterproofed (so they say) with the walls with Ames Blue Max and going to put 2inch foam insulation against walls. I am very concerened aobut water even though i haven't got any in basement and have had estimates to but french drains along the inside of basement for over 5000. Lot of money for maybe will get water.

Thinking about using DriCore for subfloor and putting my 2x4 walls on the dricore just in case any water gets in basement it will flow under the subfloor to my subpump which is lowest point of basement. Good or bad idea ? thoughts on dricore subfloor?

have reviewed many reviews on this topic just can seem to get a right answer.

I am a newbie to this forum....Thanks in advance.

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Old 05-25-2013, 08:59 PM   #2
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600sqft of dricore is expensive. i'd look into putting platon down http://retail.armtec.com/en-ca/Produ...r-Options.aspx and you can put tongue and groove plywood on top making dricore for a fraction of the price and installing it in a fraction of the time. also i'd build your walls first and then butt your subfloor to the walls. as you know water in a basement is always a threat and its not if water will enter but when. So if water does get in and you have to pull up even a section of the subfloor it would be a huge pain trying to pull it out from under your walls.
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Old 05-25-2013, 09:31 PM   #3
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The purpose of Dricore is to allow moisture to find its way out but not to allow water to flow underneath.

Correct all wet basement problems before installing Dricore.

More than 3/16 inch of water on the floor underneath will find its way up and then under the plastic edges of the Dricore cleats and cause warping and mold.
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Old 05-25-2013, 09:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ
The purpose of Dricore is to allow moisture to find its way out but not to allow water to flow underneath.

Correct all wet basement problems before installing Dricore.

More than 3/16 inch of water on the floor underneath will find its way up and then under the plastic edges of the Dricore cleats and cause warping and mold.
Thank u for info
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Old 05-25-2013, 10:32 PM   #5
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Where are you located?

Gary
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Old 05-25-2013, 10:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary in WA
Where are you located?

Gary
Located in MA
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Old 05-28-2013, 12:14 AM   #7
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I agree with princelake, above, There are many other barriers that equalize the vapor pressure (and don't use OSB), Enkadrain, DeltaFL, etc., even foamboard; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

Figure 10*F warmer, 6' down; http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html

Moisture should not be allowed to find its way around the membrane/dricore (seal the edges), it should stop gas/air to equalize the vapor drive pressure, Fig.3; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ms?full_view=1

Do you need to insulate the slab? Is dricore enough? Page 58--- ;http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...sure-guideline

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Old 05-28-2013, 06:09 AM   #8
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only benefit to dricore being made out of osb is when you basement does fill with water the osb soaks up the water swells up and floats as one unit. i've been to basement floods where theres 5-6" of water under the dricore its floating and all the peoples contents are dry. but for minor leaks osb is bad and will soak it up and you wont even notice it rotting and molding under your feet until it gets bad and starts to smell. pay insurance and make sure you have a good plan and store things in rubber totes and other stuff up off the floor.
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Old 05-28-2013, 12:31 PM   #9
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If i am using dricore it would cost me 1.25 psf with coupon at lowes/homedepot and the DMX1 step would cost me 1.09 psf......

http://www.spycor.com/DMX_Subfloor_f...ete_p/dmx1.htm

Still trying to decide which one is better for me........ have looked at so many post gets me confused
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