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Old 02-22-2015, 01:25 PM   #1
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Closet Remodel - Remove Shelving


Hello. I'm going to be doing a closet remodel very soon. The current closet is a basic builders closet: plywood shelves on 2x4 supports, with a closet rod. While inspecting I cannot see any signs of where the 2x4 supports are actually attached to the wall/studs. Anybody have any experience with this? Do the builders countersink the screws then plaster/paint over them?
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Old 02-22-2015, 02:08 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by coreym95 View Post
Hello. I'm going to be doing a closet remodel very soon. The current closet is a basic builders closet: plywood shelves on 2x4 supports, with a closet rod. While inspecting I cannot see any signs of where the 2x4 supports are actually attached to the wall/studs. Anybody have any experience with this? Do the builders countersink the screws then plaster/paint over them?

Have no idea how it was done but the use of 2X4's would be unusual and even crude in some respects. I doubt that a builder using 2X4's in this application would then have the finesse to fill any nail or screw holes. Maybe the most efficient thing for you to do would be to start taking things apart as far as you can then apply some force to the rest. Repair whatever damage you cause and move on.
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Old 02-22-2015, 02:21 PM   #3
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Have no idea how it was done but the use of 2X4's would be unusual and even crude in some respects. I doubt that a builder using 2X4's in this application would then have the finesse to fill any nail or screw holes. Maybe the most efficient thing for you to do would be to start taking things apart as far as you can then apply some force to the rest. Repair whatever damage you cause and move on.
OK, they are actually 1x3's. This isn't unusual at all. I've seen this method in countless closets. Maybe I just didn't explain it correctly. I attached a pic found on the net of what it basically looks like. They must just be nailed in and painted over. Your advice of just taking things apart and using some brute force is probably my best bet.
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Closet Remodel - Remove Shelving-closet-2-shelves.jpg  
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Old 02-22-2015, 04:59 PM   #4
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Going to have to start sanding and figure out where the first screws are and then you can start measuring off every 16" and sanding it off to find the rest of the screws.
Once you find the screws your going to have to use a bit and a hammer to clean out the paint to get them out.
A simple cheap magnetic stud finder would find them faster.
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Old 02-22-2015, 09:21 PM   #5
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Going to have to start sanding and figure out where the first screws are and then you can start measuring off every 16" and sanding it off to find the rest of the screws.
Once you find the screws your going to have to use a bit and a hammer to clean out the paint to get them out.
A simple cheap magnetic stud finder would find them faster.
Use a stud finder on the drywall to locate the studs, the fasteners will be in that location in the cleat, or even an old fashion magnetic nail finder. Run it along the cleat and when you locate metal start digging to see if it is nailed or screwed. Should be screwed. Dig out the screw heads and dis-assemble.

The picture is very helpful. Those aren't 2X4's as stated and what was done is typical and in that case the fastener holes were filled. The shelving will be nailed or screwed from the top (of course) and those fasteners may be easier to see from above.

The closet rods will lift out on one end and expose the screws that hold the cups in place.
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Old 02-23-2015, 07:33 AM   #6
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Unless it is fairly new construction I'm betting on finish nails to hold that in place. There were much easier to sink and quick finish.

Find a stud and start gentle prying with a flat bar and small block of wood to distribute the pry damage.
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Old 02-23-2015, 07:51 AM   #7
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In similar situations, to protect the drywall, I've used a 4" putty knife to slip under the cleat then the wonder bar on top of it.
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Old 02-23-2015, 03:41 PM   #8
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I had similar shelves in a closet that I wanted to convert from single bar to a double bar. I used a rubber mallet to hit the underside of the shelf and it came right off. I then gently pried off the wood part around the closet holding the shelf up with the backside of a hammer, a strong putty knife, and elbow grease.

After that, I sanded, puttied, sanded, re-puttied, primed, sanded, and painted. Looking back, I probably should have not removed the wood around the closet that held up the shelf; it didn't take up very much space, my clothes would have blocked it anyway, and now it is much harder to convert back to a single closet rod with a shelf.
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