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Old 11-21-2010, 02:10 PM   #1
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Trimming Brickmold


Hi,

First-time poster here. I'm installing an exterior storm door. My door opening between brickmold pieces is about 35.5". The door I want comes in 36". Would it be feasible to cut a chunk of the brickmold off? I think there's enough room to make this work, though I'm a little intimidated either cutting sloppily or just being wrong about this idea.

Part two of my question is only applicable if you think this is a good idea. If so, what / how should I cut it? Could I chisel it away? Is there a better tool?

Let me know if you have questions as I may not be explaining properly!

Thanks!
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Old 11-21-2010, 04:52 PM   #2
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Yes you can do it.

Chisels and chunks aren’t the way to go though.

Your best bet would be to pull off the trim, run it through a table saw and reinstall.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:01 PM   #3
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These 36" doors will fit in a small range of openings. It should fit in the 35 1/2" opening you have without brick mold chopping.
It will state the range on the box.
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Old 11-21-2010, 06:04 PM   #4
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35 7/8" min. for a Larson.
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Old 11-21-2010, 07:29 PM   #5
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Thanks for the replies.

The door itself "fits" but not with the zbars on both sides installed in the proper position (so it doesn't really fit). The instructions state it can fit a minimum of 35 3/4" and it definitely is shy a good 1/4".

I think my options are:
  1. Chisel a piece off. Benefit is I can do it in place, without too much hassle, but it may come out weird. The cut will be partially visible (part of it will be visible in between the two doors).
  2. Take off trim and cut with table saw. Benefit is a better cut. Negative is taking it off, especially since it looks like it's a few pieces fit together (don't ask me why it's not a solid piece). Also, it's kind of a weird cut. I need it to be cut the long way so it's narrower. I guess I could use a plane too, but when discussing the chisel option I was thinking about taking a corner/edge off the length of the wood (if that makes sense).
  3. Build a new brickmold frame for the storm door dimensions.
  4. Return the door.

I'd prefer not to do the latter. I think I can make it fit using the existing brickmold if I trim it, though I'm not opposed to making a frame of sorts for the storm door.

Anyways, thanks for the replies. If you have any other thoughts, please share, else wish me luck!

Thanks!
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Old 11-21-2010, 08:25 PM   #6
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A router would cut off most of that--then a chisel--

I do think pulling off the molding and making a narrower on on a table saw will be faster and look better,
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Old 11-21-2010, 10:29 PM   #7
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Leave the chisel in the garage, The only way to do this decently is to remove and run the pieces through a table saw.

There are two potential problems to be aware of.

1. ripping the edge of the brickmold down the inside(short side of the miter edge) will leave a small triangle missing when the miter goes back together. I don't see this as a problem, as the flange on the storm door should be wide enough to hide it.

2. Depending on how the door jamb is fabricated, ripping 1/4" off the trim could leave a very minimal amount of the brickmold on the doorjamb, so you will need to be carefull when nailing it back onto the jamb. It would be a good idead to shim the jamb liberally, as the brickmold will most likely not do a very good job of holding the jambs in place nailed along the very edge of the jambs as they will be. If you have a "modern" rabitted factory door unit, this should not pose as much a problem, as the jambs will be 5/4 material, but if an older unit with only 3/4" jambs and applied stops, the above situation will come into play.

Last edited by troubleseeker; 11-21-2010 at 10:38 PM.
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Old 11-22-2010, 10:29 AM   #8
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As you reduce the inner flat part of the brick mold you might need to knock off part of the face profile so the storm door frame sits flat on the brick mold face.
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Old 11-23-2010, 09:59 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
As you reduce the inner flat part of the brick mold you might need to knock off part of the face profile so the storm door frame sits flat on the brick mold face.
Ron

Good catch Ron
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Old 11-26-2010, 06:40 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
35 7/8" min. for a Larson.
35 5/8 for an Emco!
Of course, if it's a wood door, then cut the door. Otherwise do as someone else said and remove both side mouldings and rip an equal amount off each
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Old 11-27-2010, 09:54 AM   #11
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Thanks!


Hi everyone,

I just wanted to thank you for the help. I was able to cut the wood brickmold trim slightly on one side giving me enough room to fit the door together. It was only very slightly too small, and now that it's all together, you can't even tell I had to cut it. Yay!

Thanks again!
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