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Old 09-04-2014, 09:05 AM   #1
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Tips For Installing Ceiling Mold


Since I hi jacked tjbingha thread, with his permission I have moved this to a thread of its own, if you have any tips for installing ceiling mold please tell us.

Sorry Dawg for posting on your post.
BigJim


I'm going to be trying the coping thing very soon. I'm close to doing the cove molding in the family room and I really like the idea

I really like the idea of being able to slap the molding up on the longest wall, wall to wall. The side walls are much shorter and it will be easy to manhandle the lengths.

But I think I'll try the angle grinder and table saw method.

To speed things up, I'll make a jig. 2 2x4's in an L shape with a piece of cove attached. I can the test for end fit at the saw without having to climb up the ladder.
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Old 09-04-2014, 10:09 AM   #2
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Dawg, way back when I ran ceiling mold by myself, I would drive an 8d nail or 10d, what ever I had, back a ways from the end of the room to rest the ceiling mold on so I didn't have to try to hold a long stick of it up with one hand and bed the mold in the corner. I made sure to drive the nail in above where the mold would bed so the nail hole didn't show.

When you get ready to do some coping, make the 45 degree cut, use your pencil and mark it down the edge of the cut of the profile right where you are going to cope, that way it makes it much easier to see what you are cutting to.

Hold the coping saw so when you cope you are taking the back out of the mold. For example, don't hold the coping saw at a 90 degree angle of the mold, hold the saw so you have a 45 degree or greater so it cuts a lot of the material out of the back, if not the cope will not lay in.

Give it a try, cope the mold holding your saw at a 90 degree of the molding, then try to bed it in to the other corner piece. See, the mold will have a good gap because the back of the mold hits.

Another tip, when I cut the ceiling mold, I would put the two short runs up first, then cope both ends of the long run and pop the long piece in. Cut the long run a good heavy 1/8 inch longer than what your measurement is. Don't add that much on a short piece like a closet, it will be too much.

Bed one end of the mold in letting the other end rest on the nail and bowing out away from the wall. Nail a couple two or three nails in the mold at the start end.

Now go to the other end, pull the ceiling mold out away from the wall with one hand and push the coped end in to bed it into the other piece. once it is bedded in just pop the mold in, once it is where you want it nail two or three nails in there.

If the mold isn't bedding right, you may have to roll both pieces of mold out at the top or out at the bottom to make the fit. If it is close, just take a block of wood and bump the joint in the direction you need to. When I say roll, I mean slide the mold up the wall or down the wall, either way you will have to roll the mold to make it work. You will see once you are there.

Now go back to the center, pull the nail that the mold was resting on, push the mold in tight. It will look like it grew there. I hope I didn't confuse you here. This is the way I found was the best way for me, it may not be for you.

Edit* Good grief, I have written a book here. I forgot, if your room is too long and you have to splice the mold, cut it on a 22 1/2 degree angle, when you crowd the mold it won't slide past the other piece as easy as if it were cut on a 45.
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Old 09-04-2014, 10:22 AM   #3
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Wow Jim, great write up....thank you.

And, yes, I understood it all. Had to read it twice to make sure I understood the steps....but it was clear.

And, yes, I understand what you mean by 'roll'. In fact, getting the 'roll' wrong is one of the common mistakes when cutting molding on a compound miter saw.

So...in my case, your suggesting I cope the long piece? Which actually might be better....it's going to be 2 pieces anyway. It's about an 18' run and the longest I can get cove is 16'. So...depending on how the other lengths come out...I'll have two pieces with each end coped and a 45 deg cut in the middle for the join.
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Old 09-04-2014, 04:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post
Wow Jim, great write up....thank you.

And, yes, I understood it all. Had to read it twice to make sure I understood the steps....but it was clear.

And, yes, I understand what you mean by 'roll'. In fact, getting the 'roll' wrong is one of the common mistakes when cutting molding on a compound miter saw.

So...in my case, your suggesting I cope the long piece? Which actually might be better....it's going to be 2 pieces anyway. It's about an 18' run and the longest I can get cove is 16'. So...depending on how the other lengths come out...I'll have two pieces with each end coped and a 45 deg cut in the middle for the join.
On the trim, are the short runs short enough to run wall to wall without splicing? If so, it would be best to run the long run with the splice first and not cope it, then cope both ends of the short run and pop the short run in like explained before. I don't splice on a 45 degree cut, I splice on a 22 1/2 degree cut, it is just easier when pressure is applied to that joint, a 45 degree cut will move where most times a 22 1/2 degree won't.

Another way to run the ceiling mold is first piece wall to wall square, next piece cope one end that beds into the first run, tack in place. If joint isn't tight enough, use your chisel or flat bar, force it in at the end of the mold that is not coped and pry outwards, it will put pressure on the joint and close the gap. It is best if you have two people doing it this way.
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Old 09-05-2014, 10:11 AM   #5
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Another tip y'all can try.

On large moldings, I've found that joining pieces for a long run using a biscuit joint will work better than a overlap joint.

FWIW: I also used the table saw for back cutting, and that seems to be a lot easier than coping, or my other method of using my Rotzip.
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