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Bob... 09-25-2015 09:33 AM

Which router and bit?
 
1 Attachment(s)
I need a recommendation on what type of router and bit I need to create an edge matching the attached image. The cut is the same on top and bottom of the edge. I'm working with poplar. I normally buy the best tools available, but in this case I really just need it to do a couple of sills, so don't want to spend more than is necessary to do a good job on these few sills.

Also, the sills pictured have been sitting in an air-conditioned space for a few years. Before I paint, I guess I may need to sand. I have a palm sander, and a random orbital sander, but would hand sanding with a fine grain sand paper work best?

Thanks for any help,
Bob

Attachment 198657

TimPa 09-25-2015 10:01 AM

best tool for that job is a table mounted router, and guessing a 3/4" cove bit. that diameter appears greater than the 3/8" that it is cut in. router could be hand held if board is clamped securely.

palm sander with 150 will be fine.

Millertyme 09-25-2015 05:42 PM

Box core bit with bottom bearing

Canarywood1 09-25-2015 06:07 PM

A cove bit is what you need as 1st poster said, core box won't cut that profile, as to size pretty hard to say from looking at the pic, but use a 1/2 " shank bit for sure.

SeniorSitizen 09-25-2015 06:30 PM

Multiple passes with the cove bit.

ront02769 09-25-2015 08:59 PM

Obviously a cove bit, with multiple thin passes given that poplar sometimes chips and or aplinters...but that said, to the orig poster, next time you have a similar issue, Google "router bit profiles" and you will get charts with virtually every router bit in existence along with a profile of the cut that it makes. Ron

Bob... 09-26-2015 11:53 AM

Thank you for your responses (and thanks for the search term and multi-pass advice ront2769). TimPA mentions a table router, which sounds like the best way, but probably not cost efficient for what I want to do. Could something along the lines of a trim router handle this? If so, are there accessories that I should get (i.e., edge guide, etc.)? And, most importantly, is this a job that a novice should take on? I'm very mechanical and renovated my entire house mostly on my own with help from here and other sources, but am I taking on more trouble than necessary for just a sill or two?

Wild Willard 09-26-2015 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob... (Post 2518209)
Thank you for your responses (and thanks for the search term and multi-pass advice ront2769). TimPA mentions a table router, which sounds like the best way, but probably not cost efficient for what I want to do. Could something along the lines of a trim router handle this? If so, are there accessories that I should get (i.e., edge guide, etc.)? And, most importantly, is this a job that a novice should take on? I'm very mechanical and renovated my entire house mostly on my own with help from here and other sources, but am I taking on more trouble than necessary for just a sill or two?


Lowes has a skill 1.75hp router w/ 1/2" collet for under $70 that's ideal for a few sills. You need a larger base than a trim router has, ideally. The cove bit will have a rub bearing that guides-controls the line of the cut. Edge the bearing rides on needs to be straight and smooth. Small imperfections may "telegraph" into the cut profile.

Do a few practice passes on scrap, let the tool do the work and sand the mill marks from the cutter out of the profile. It'll turn out well.

Bob... 09-26-2015 12:21 PM

Thanks Wild Willard. And good timing...I had just decided that I might run to Home Depot or Lowes to see what their offerings were, and you've given me a bit more to go on.

oh'mike 09-26-2015 01:45 PM

All good advice---a 1/2" collet machine will also come with a 1/4" collet---allowing you to use whatever bit you can find---1/2" bits are very popular right now, and are on sale more often than the 1/4" bits.

A table can be made out of a scrap of 1/2" cabinet ply---hole for the bit--base screwed in from below---a straight board clamped for a fence---

Look at 'Woodworking Talk' for home made table plans.Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum

Bob... 09-26-2015 02:28 PM

Thanks for the confirmation and link. I already picked up the router and am looking at bits now. No 1/2" shank cove bits available at HD or Lowes, so I'm getting a 1/4 shank 1/4 cove bit for now. I won't be doing this til Monday, so I'll check supply distributors to see what's available and bring this back if need be. Again, thanks to all for all the help!

Canarywood1 09-26-2015 02:51 PM

If you decide to go with that 1/4" shank bit, be sure you take very light cuts, the last thing you want is for that bit to snap, and chase you around the shop, here's a link to bits and free shipping.

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...t=3+4+%22+cove

oh'mike 09-26-2015 03:17 PM

I've been doing router work since the 1960s---I've never snapped off a 1/4" bit--

I do prefer 1/2" bits--but I never had a real issue with a 1/4" one.

craig11152 09-26-2015 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 2518841)
http://www.easyfreesmileys.com/smile...mileys-267.gif I've been doing router work since the 1960s

http://www.easyfreesmileys.com/smile...mileys-609.gif

Bob... 09-26-2015 04:23 PM

I decided to wait on the bit until monday. The selections were too slim at the big box stores. The best I could find was a 1/4" shank 1/4" cove or a 1/2" shank 5/8 cove. One seemed to big, one (maybe) too small.
@Canarywood1 : Those are about 1/3 of the price of those I saw at HD. Are those decent bits?


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