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Old 06-23-2015, 05:05 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 47_47 View Post
Anything is fixable, but by the time you patch the bottom, lock holes, striker, hinge mortises, re-hang the door... how much are you saving? Unless the door is a unique size, I'd get a new one.
The door is not a unique size, but a unique style and I have nothing invested at this point, beyond door hardware, which I would need for any door.
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Old 06-23-2015, 05:33 PM   #17
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Two pieces of plywood, glued and screwed together.
Then glued and pocket screwed ( both sides) to the door, puttied, sanded, painted......
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Old 06-24-2015, 10:31 AM   #18
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I agree that a new door would be far easier, but if you're still looking to tackle this as a refurb, best of luck to you. For fixing the hole left from the old knob, I would cut a piece of wood to a good fit, and use construction adhesive to glue it in (I'd avoid the wood glue here because it requires a well-fit joint, and that may be tough for this spot). Once that's in, fill any remaining spots with some bondo (it's not just for cars!), or wood filler and sand smooth. You won't even know there was a hole there. For hinge mortises, I would use a router (you could use a chisel if you don't have a router) to slightly enlarge the hinge mortise and get some fresh wood, and glue a patch in, then fill it, sand it.

Actually, I would do none of that. I'd buy a new door
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Old 06-24-2015, 11:04 AM   #19
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when I have a door with lockset on the wrong side, I flip the door. this will place the non weather proof side of the window trim to the exterior. if you have a storm door, no problem.

usually you have to open the hinge mortises for the hinge to reverse, and recut the bevel on the strike edge. if you don't have enough wood to do that, square the edge up and glue a strip on.
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Old 06-28-2015, 02:32 PM   #20
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More responses I missed. Thanks guys!

So door is mostly stripped now. Good news is, the rot is not NEARLY as bad as I expected. I need to take an inch off the height of the door which leaves about 3/4"
(give or take) that needs to be repaired on the rail portion of the bottom. The Stile, still needs about 2-1/2" of repair, however! It's only about 1/2" in to the outside of the door. The other side of the door has very little rot and is solid, so that changes the repair a bit.

Mortise slot for the lock set was already filled when I got it. they did a decent job. Only a hole for a modern lock set. Easy fill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
when I have a door with lockset on the wrong side, I flip the door. this will place the non weather proof side of the window trim to the exterior. if you have a storm door, no problem.

usually you have to open the hinge mortises for the hinge to reverse, and recut the bevel on the strike edge. if you don't have enough wood to do that, square the edge up and glue a strip on.
I need to take about 3/16" off each side, which will cover my hinge mortises and give me a nice clean cut on both sides.

In response to the window trim thing, I don't have a storm door, so I think I'm sunk on that concept. There isn't roof over this door either, like a stoop roof, however I'm thinking of adding one because this door is very exposed to the elements when it storms and also will be the main rear entry for the home. That being said, probably not a good idea to have the trim on the outside, right?

I know it's always easier to buy new, but a nice exterior solid core door is not exactly cheap. I'll have less than 100 in this door (not including lock set) and not to mention it's a great project!
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Old 06-28-2015, 07:49 PM   #21
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Not quite the same issue as you but a few years back I bought oak bi-fold doors that turned out to be a couple inches too short. I went out and bought some oak stock, cut it to the appropriate thickness on the table saw and then countersunk some holes on the bottom. Wood glue and screws to secure and then stain and poly. These were interior doors so not as much concern about weatherproofing, but if you cut the rot away and end up with a straight bottom the method is pretty much the same.
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Old 06-29-2015, 12:57 PM   #22
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Quote:
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Not quite the same issue as you but a few years back I bought oak bi-fold doors that turned out to be a couple inches too short. I went out and bought some oak stock, cut it to the appropriate thickness on the table saw and then countersunk some holes on the bottom. Wood glue and screws to secure and then stain and poly. These were interior doors so not as much concern about weatherproofing, but if you cut the rot away and end up with a straight bottom the method is pretty much the same.
Yep! Pretty much the simplest way, it appears. Thank you for sharing that!
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