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Old 01-23-2020, 02:07 PM   #1
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Looking for a book on history of building....


that i used to have, about 30 yrs ago. softcover, that focused on wood construction and how its changed over the years

two items that it spoke about in particular that i recall;

1. in the older times studs were 24 oc and moved to 16 oc because the wood being used was not as thick/solid as older times. (correct me if i'm wrong, i'm aware that 24 oc studs may still be used, but not the standard these days)

2. old wooden support columns on the inside of warehouses or maybe in big attics had the 4 corners shaved down to take the edge off to slow down fire - easier for it to catch a 90 degree edge as opposed to something a little softer. i saw some of these in a warehouse that had been converted to an inside mall, shops, food, etc, big old wooden plank foods and these massive columns with the edges shaved back.

thanks,

jim
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Old 01-23-2020, 07:02 PM   #2
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


24" oc is the standard for 2" x 6" wall studs.
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Old 01-23-2020, 07:04 PM   #3
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


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24" oc is the standard for 2" x 6" wall studs.
thanks, but still looking for the book.
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Old 01-23-2020, 11:04 PM   #4
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


Can you remember the title, maybe the author, maybe the group sponsoring the publication.

Really need more data to do a good search.


ED
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Old 01-23-2020, 11:59 PM   #5
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


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Originally Posted by de-nagorg View Post
Can you remember the title, maybe the author, maybe the group sponsoring the publication.

Really need more data to do a good search.


ED
i wish i could Ed, i know it's a long shot...but thanks in any event.
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:03 AM   #6
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


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i wish i could Ed, i know it's a long shot...but thanks in any event.
Can you describe the picture or on the front cover.
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:16 AM   #7
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


I took a college course on the history of construction methods. It was very interesting. There is also a seldom seen stud spacing of 19.2” centers. 16” centers has 5 studs between studs at 8’ centers, 24” centers has 3 studs and 19.2” centers has 4 studs.

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Old 01-24-2020, 12:23 AM   #8
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


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I took a college course on the history of construction methods. It was very interesting. There is also a seldom seen stud spacing of 19.2 inches. 16 centers has 5 studs between studs at 8 centers, 23 has 3 studs and 19.2 has 4 studs.
Then, it was a College Text Book?

There is a place to start, lookup the course SYLLABUS, they list the Text Books needed for the course.

I have all my old Text Books in the library room, along with many other books that I have acquired over the last 60 years.


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Old 01-24-2020, 12:51 AM   #9
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


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I took a college course on the history of construction methods. It was very interesting. There is also a seldom seen stud spacing of 19.2 centers. 16 centers has 5 studs between studs at 8 centers, 24 centers has 3 studs and 19.2 centers has 4 studs.
That is metric, a meter is 39.4" We often got TGI floor system and they went to 19" OC so 8 ft sheets still fit.
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Old 01-24-2020, 11:46 AM   #10
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


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Can you describe the picture or on the front cover.
i so remember that the illustrations were hand drawn in the book. Cover - too many years ago. I know it's not likely, was hoping that someone would remember the 2 examples - focusing on how they built in the older days and why.

thanks everyone for trying.

jim
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:05 PM   #11
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


Well in thinking about this further & with your questions etc I may have found what I'm looking for. I remembered there was another book about the same time with the same author about buildings falling down and from there a book about buildings not falling down.

I have read these books, whether they contain the 2 examples I started with or not - who knows. They were both reissued in 2002 so their first publication could be the ones I saw. Library doesn't have them but I've made a request for them to either borrow or buy them. Will let everyone know how it turns out! Thanks again for the interest.

Why Buildings Stand Up

https://www.amazon.com/Why-Buildings...s%2C228&sr=1-1

Why Buildings Fall Down

https://www.amazon.com/Why-Buildings...s%2C237&sr=1-1
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Old 01-24-2020, 12:59 PM   #12
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


Now that you know who the author is, do a GOOGLE, and search for their other books, you are sure to find out which book you seek.


ED
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:43 AM   #13
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Re: Looking for a book on history of building....


In the older times there was no plywood, walls were sheathed with random lengths of boards, and studs were used to infill the space between braced posts and beams.


I have seen many houses built between 1880 and 1920, when stud walls already doubled as shear walls with let-in braces, and they were all framed with studs at 16" o.c.
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